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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | July 3, 2013
Offered as is: 16,400-square-foot building previously used by troops preparing to defend the country. This property features a big yard, a long driveway and a great location near the community pool. Waynesboro's former armory off Pa. 316/Grant Street is one of 11 Pennsylvania National Guard buildings being put up for sale under legislation awaiting Gov. Tom Corbett's signature. His spokeswoman indicated he will sign the bill. The 10-acre site in Waynesboro was vacated in 2010 when guardsmen moved into a new readiness center in South Mountain, Pa. The armory, which was built in 1936, remains on the National Register of Historic Places.
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NEWS
by DON AINES | December 23, 2006
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - A Waynesboro man has been indicted by a grand jury on charges of distributing approximately 10 ounces of methamphetamine he obtained in Hagerstown in 2005, according to the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office. Carlos Justin Mills, 27, of 2954 Oak Hill Road, was arraigned Thursday before Magisterial District Judge Larry Pentz in Waynesboro on charges of delivery of a controlled substance and criminal conspiracy, according to Pentz's office. He was released on $25,000 bail, a member of Pentz's staff said.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 12, 2012
Shippensburg (Pa.) University, which is facing hefty state funding cuts, hosted a tour Thursday for a legislator who praised its innovation. University President William Ruud showed off the college's new dormitory, renovated student union, rented textbooks, solar panel and energy-savings system. “This is good research for me as I go back to (the capital in) Harrisburg and advocate,” said state Rep. Rob Kauffman, R-Franklin/Cumberland. Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett has suggested cutting funding to the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, which includes Shippensburg University, by 30 percent for 2012-13.
OPINION
April 15, 2013
Pa. lawmakers do not support our local schools To the editor: If Franklin County residents like paying higher property taxes so that our communities' children can go to school in crowded classrooms with fewer and fewer educational opportunities, they have elected the perfect governor and state lawmakers. If Franklin County residents want their school tax dollars to be spent on expensive advertising, political lobbying, seven-figure CEO salaries and shareholder profits for cyber charter school management companies instead of being used to educate children, they have elected the perfect governor and state lawmakers.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | March 11, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Richard Alloway II exited stage left and affixed his eyes squarely on Robert "Bob" Curley on Monday evening. Alloway had spoken for three minutes as the first Pennsylvania Senate candidate given the opportunity to do so at the annual Franklin County GOP Lincoln Day Dinner. The 33rd District candidate was noticeably riled up. Curley, one of Alloway's three opponents, had spoken out over the weekend about what Curley maintains are omissions about Alloway's work history.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 25, 2011
The Waynesboro Area School Board is expected to continue hammering out its 2011-12 budget and possible program cuts at a meeting scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday. The board is looking at areas of its curriculum not mandated by the state to be taught. On its list are some foreign language, technology education, and family and consumer sciences classes, according to Superintendent James Robertson. “We’re just looking at ways to close the gap,” Robertson said Monday. The board is grappling with an anticipated $1.9 million deficit, which is after two support staff positions and six teacher positions are cut. Contributing to the deficit is a plan from Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett to return K-12 public education funding to 2008-09 levels.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | December 15, 2010
Municipal and county leaders from Franklin County, Pa., called on state representatives Wednesday to address a half-dozen priorities in 2011. The Franklin County Council of Governments (COG) provided five legislators with information about transportation funding, prevailing wage, bid limits, electronic advertising, police radar and storm water management. COG members also shared a few of their other concerns during a relaxed conversation with state Reps. Dan Moul, Rob Kauffman, Mark Keller and Todd Rock and state Sen. Richard Alloway.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | November 4, 2012
The Obama and Romney campaigns turned their attention to Pennsylvania and its 20 electoral votes this weekend as polls showed the president holding only a slight lead in the state coming into Tuesday's election. In Franklin County, Pa., registered Republican voters outnumber Democrats nearly 2-to-1. Still, county political watchers say turnout will be key when polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Voter turnout was 72 percent in Franklin County in November 2008, according to published reports.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 13, 2011
Negotiating teams for the Waynesboro Area School Board and the district's teachers union met Wednesday for a bargaining session that both sides described as unproductive. The meeting involved "heated exchanges" and "disagreement," according to Richard Galtman, a lawyer serving as lead negotiator for the school board. "I think the frustration level on both sides is palpable. ... We disconnect on what is and what is not a fair proposal," Galtman said. "It has definitely turned to hostile discussion, majorly hostile discussion of the financial status of the board.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | November 10, 2011
DRV NOW ... TXT L8R for nontexters means drive now, text later, and it's a warning that could save your life. Pennsylvania Wednesday became the 35th state to ban texting while driving when Gov. Tom Corbett signed a bill into law prohibiting it. The law, which goes into effect in March, will make texting a primary offense, meaning police can pull over drivers they see violating the law. It carries a potential $50 fine. There were 13,790 crashes and 66 fatalities in Pennsylvania in 2010 caused by distracted driving, according to Corbett.
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