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Tobacco Companies

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NEWS
by Ron Frew | September 30, 2006
Sometimes when it appears you have won, you really have lost. Such is the case with the recent federal judicial decision concerning the government's case against the top cigarette makers that were charged with deception concerning their product and its health effects, mislabeling of their product and violations of the RICO laws. In her ruling in the long-running case, Judge Gladys Kessler said, "Over the course of more than 50 years, defendants lied, misrepresented and deceived the American public, including smokers and the young people they avidly sought as 'replacement smokers,' about the devastating health effects of smoking and environmental tobacco smoke (second hand smoke)
NEWS
January 26, 1999
Christmas usually comes in December, but for this year's Pennsylvania legislature, the big gift may be delivered in March, when the state receives the first hunk of a $11.3 billion settlement with the tobacco industry. We agree with Jeff Weisberg, head of Pennsylvania's chapter of the American Heart Association, that it would be unfortunate if the cash were diverted away from health-related matters. We take that stand because even though it sounds like a lot of money, there are already a lot of programs vying for a share of it, and once it's gone, it's gone.
NEWS
May 22, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- A federal appeals court on Friday agreed with the major elements of a 2006 landmark ruling that found the nation's top tobacco companies guilty of racketeering and fraud for deceiving the public about the dangers of smoking. The U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington upheld requirements that manufacturers change the way they market cigarettes. The requirements, which have been on hold pending appeal, would ban labels such as "low tar," "light," "ultra light" or "mild," since such cigarettes have been found to be no safer than others because of how people smoke them.
NEWS
by Jessica Hanlin | September 10, 2002
Every school has the notorious 'smoker's bathroom' - the bathroom that people duck into during lunch and between classes to get a quick smoke. Pass by, and the billowing smoke can often be seen into the hallway. It seems everyone's smoking. In 1998, 46 states were paid a $246 billion settlement by tobacco companies. States' attorneys general said smokers were getting sick from smoking cigarettes, that tobacco companies knew cigarettes contained addictive and harmful substances, and the states were having to pick up the health care tab. So this money was to go for health care and, mainly, smoking prevention.
NEWS
June 24, 1997
Boy, all those 30-odd (hack hack) years of Chesterfields are really taking their toll. I new it was a (cough cough) nasty habit when I got into it, but I was young and (wheeze wheeze) impressionable and I bought in to all that slick "Chesters beat the Resters" advertising (gasp gasp) campaign and before you knew it I, through no fault of my own, became addicted to the corporation's carefully manipulated nicotine levels and I was hooked. So. Where does the line start for those big tobacco bucks?
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | April 18, 2013
After throat cancer took his voice box, it took David Briles three years to learn how to speak a complete sentence by burping continuously. The 59-year-old Charleston, W.Va., native never regained much of his ability to laugh again, but was determined not to use a device known as an electrolarynx in order to talk. “I didn't want to sound like a robot,” Briles said Thursday after speaking to Martinsburg High School students about the dangers of tobacco use and how it changed his life.
NEWS
June 22, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama cited his own long struggle to quit the cigarettes he got hooked on as a teenager as he signed the nation's strongest-ever anti-smoking bill Monday and praised it for providing critically needed protections for kids. "The decades-long effort to protect our children from the harmful effects of tobacco has emerged victorious," Obama said at a signing ceremony in the White House Rose Garden. The bill marks the latest legislative victory for Obama's first five months.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | May 18, 2004
marlob@herald-mail.com It took more than Victor DeNoble's scientific brain Monday to convince Washington County's fifth-graders not to smoke cigarettes. It also took the brain of Sarah the monkey and the human brain of an unidentified cancer victim that DeNoble brought along to help prove his point. A key witness in governmental hearings 10 years ago, DeNoble helped blow the whistle on the tobacco industry's practices, which led to the $710 billion settlement over the addictive properties of nicotine.
NEWS
July 12, 1999
Close the health-care gap To the editor: Surplus taxes should be used to reimburse those folks who got caught up in something called the "Gap" years because they got cheated out of some of their benefits, and to this day I do not understand why this happened in the first place. I just know one person who got "Trapped In The Gap. " Since the doctors need protection from people practicing medicine without a license, what do they think the rest of us should do with no protection from either?
NEWS
July 20, 1998
"Doesn't anything that a U.S. Congressman, two U.S. Senators, a state senator and the mayor, doesn't anything that they say mean anything anymore? When you've got that kind of support for something like this Roundhouse project and the City Council ignores it, I just don't understand it. They seem not to be able to recognize a gift horse. I just hope that the County Commissioners have more wisdom and will act accordingly because I think it's a really, really good thing for the Hagerstown area.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | April 18, 2013
After throat cancer took his voice box, it took David Briles three years to learn how to speak a complete sentence by burping continuously. The 59-year-old Charleston, W.Va., native never regained much of his ability to laugh again, but was determined not to use a device known as an electrolarynx in order to talk. “I didn't want to sound like a robot,” Briles said Thursday after speaking to Martinsburg High School students about the dangers of tobacco use and how it changed his life.
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NEWS
June 22, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama cited his own long struggle to quit the cigarettes he got hooked on as a teenager as he signed the nation's strongest-ever anti-smoking bill Monday and praised it for providing critically needed protections for kids. "The decades-long effort to protect our children from the harmful effects of tobacco has emerged victorious," Obama said at a signing ceremony in the White House Rose Garden. The bill marks the latest legislative victory for Obama's first five months.
NEWS
May 22, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- A federal appeals court on Friday agreed with the major elements of a 2006 landmark ruling that found the nation's top tobacco companies guilty of racketeering and fraud for deceiving the public about the dangers of smoking. The U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington upheld requirements that manufacturers change the way they market cigarettes. The requirements, which have been on hold pending appeal, would ban labels such as "low tar," "light," "ultra light" or "mild," since such cigarettes have been found to be no safer than others because of how people smoke them.
NEWS
by Ron Frew | September 30, 2006
Sometimes when it appears you have won, you really have lost. Such is the case with the recent federal judicial decision concerning the government's case against the top cigarette makers that were charged with deception concerning their product and its health effects, mislabeling of their product and violations of the RICO laws. In her ruling in the long-running case, Judge Gladys Kessler said, "Over the course of more than 50 years, defendants lied, misrepresented and deceived the American public, including smokers and the young people they avidly sought as 'replacement smokers,' about the devastating health effects of smoking and environmental tobacco smoke (second hand smoke)
NEWS
September 6, 2006
"Are you in danger from a terrorist attack? Yes, but if you read the local paper and think about it, I believe you will conclude that you are more likely to encounter a local mugging, robbery or shooting. Our concerns should be about what is being done locally to stop the violence. Terrorism is getting the press coverage, but I think it is more likely we will be harmed by local thugs. " - Waynesboro, Pa. "I think this is a perfect example of the government/big business connection.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | May 18, 2004
marlob@herald-mail.com It took more than Victor DeNoble's scientific brain Monday to convince Washington County's fifth-graders not to smoke cigarettes. It also took the brain of Sarah the monkey and the human brain of an unidentified cancer victim that DeNoble brought along to help prove his point. A key witness in governmental hearings 10 years ago, DeNoble helped blow the whistle on the tobacco industry's practices, which led to the $710 billion settlement over the addictive properties of nicotine.
NEWS
by Jessica Hanlin | September 10, 2002
Every school has the notorious 'smoker's bathroom' - the bathroom that people duck into during lunch and between classes to get a quick smoke. Pass by, and the billowing smoke can often be seen into the hallway. It seems everyone's smoking. In 1998, 46 states were paid a $246 billion settlement by tobacco companies. States' attorneys general said smokers were getting sick from smoking cigarettes, that tobacco companies knew cigarettes contained addictive and harmful substances, and the states were having to pick up the health care tab. So this money was to go for health care and, mainly, smoking prevention.
NEWS
July 12, 1999
Close the health-care gap To the editor: Surplus taxes should be used to reimburse those folks who got caught up in something called the "Gap" years because they got cheated out of some of their benefits, and to this day I do not understand why this happened in the first place. I just know one person who got "Trapped In The Gap. " Since the doctors need protection from people practicing medicine without a license, what do they think the rest of us should do with no protection from either?
NEWS
January 26, 1999
Christmas usually comes in December, but for this year's Pennsylvania legislature, the big gift may be delivered in March, when the state receives the first hunk of a $11.3 billion settlement with the tobacco industry. We agree with Jeff Weisberg, head of Pennsylvania's chapter of the American Heart Association, that it would be unfortunate if the cash were diverted away from health-related matters. We take that stand because even though it sounds like a lot of money, there are already a lot of programs vying for a share of it, and once it's gone, it's gone.
NEWS
July 20, 1998
"Doesn't anything that a U.S. Congressman, two U.S. Senators, a state senator and the mayor, doesn't anything that they say mean anything anymore? When you've got that kind of support for something like this Roundhouse project and the City Council ignores it, I just don't understand it. They seem not to be able to recognize a gift horse. I just hope that the County Commissioners have more wisdom and will act accordingly because I think it's a really, really good thing for the Hagerstown area.
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