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Time Management

NEWS
December 19, 2002
Sasse: Teachers need more planning time The Washington County Teachers Association President Claude Sasse presented the Washington County Board of Education Tuesday with concerns he has about time management in the classroom. Sasse said teachers don't have enough planning and staff development time, but admitted that rescheduling times to accomodate teachers would be a burden on administrators. He suggested teachers and administrators work together to acknowledge time constraints in the classroom and teachers be allowed more flexibility in directing learning time.
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NEWS
by DON AINES | February 20, 2007
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Promising to be an "all-day, every-day" commissioner, retired federal analyst Carl Barton has become the latest entrant in the race for the Franklin County Board of Commissioners. In his announcement, Barton, a Republican, said he will give up the difference between a commissioner's salary and the annual pay of his last full-time job and donate it to county children and youth programs. Commissioners are paid $63,458 this year, according to county figures, and the difference is approximately $20,000, Barton said.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | February 15, 2009
McCONNELLSBURG, Pa. - During Sherie Lake's exit interview from an established insurance firm 14 years ago, she was asked if she was afraid. Afraid because Lake was leaving to run her own insurance agency. Back then Lake says her answer was probably, "Yes. " But during the last 10 years, she concluded that people who work for others are probably the ones who should be afraid. "I control my own destiny," says Lake, who last year published her first writing - a chapter on time management in "A Business Success Journal," published by Lowry Marketing Group.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | February 5, 2005
tarar@herald-mail.com GREENCASTLE, PA. - The Antrim Township (Pa.) Supervisors have agreed to spend $1 million for land on South Antrim Way to build a municipal government center. The new center would house administrative, planning, zoning, road, sewer and water offices; a larger public meeting area; District Justice offices and hearing room; and the township Tax Collector's office, according to a written statement. With a 25 percent population increase over the last 10 years in the township, the supervisors wanted a larger facility with enough room for future expansion, according to the statement.
NEWS
by DON AINES | November 27, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -A consortium of Franklin County businesses is offering to teach job seekers the "soft skills" needed to get and keep jobs through a new program, Basic Employment and Skills Training (BEST). "This program is not going to teach anybody to be a welder or a nurse," Franklin County Area Development Corp. President L. Michael Ross said Wednesday of the BEST program. Instead, employees of participating companies will instruct people in the basics of business communication, teamwork, personal development, health and safety and customer service.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | March 8, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - An estimated 14 million children across the country are latchkey children, meaning when they return home from school no parent or guardian is there to look after them. In Berkeley County, school officials are trying to obtain a grant to change that. If approved, the county would receive $448,000 a year for three years to implement an after-school program. A reduced amount of funding, to be offset by community partnerships, would follow for the next two years, said Wendy Bird, a second-grade teacher at Tuscarora Elementary School.
NEWS
By DON AINES | February 19, 2007
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. Promising to be an "all-day, every-day" commissioner, retired federal analyst Carl Barton has become the latest entrant in the race for the Franklin County Board of Commissioners. In his announcement, Barton, a Republican, said he will give up the difference between a commissioner's salary and the annual pay of his last full-time job and donate it to county children and youth programs. Commissioners are paid $63,458 this year, according to county figures, and the difference is approximately $20,000, Barton said.
NEWS
February 28, 2008
If Washington County's John Barr were a player in the National Football League, the sportscasters would be saying he'd just had a "career year. " His achievements, in 2007 and throughout his public life, earned him the honor of being named the Hagerstown-Washington County Business Person of the Year last night. His accomplishments are legion. Along with co-chair Tom Newcomer, Barr helped the United Way of Washington County reach its highest-ever goal of $1.9 million. To put the fundraising effort over the top, Barr, Howard and Ann Kaylor and the Community Foundation of Washington County pledged to donate $50,000, if the community would match it. Not long before, Barr and his company, Ellsworth Electric Inc., donated $200,000 to convert the old Broadway School on Hagerstown's Locust Street into a trade school that is being run by Associated Builders and Contractors.
NEWS
August 30, 2010
KINGWOOD, W.Va. - The West Virginia Wing of the Civil Air Patrol recently completed its annual cadet summer encampment at Camp Dawson, an Army National Guard training facility in Kingwood. The weeklong event is held each year in order to give the CAP cadets a greater understanding of CAP and its Air Force missions and capabilities, develop the cadets' leadership skills, enhance their interpersonal and time management skills and instill a sense of pride and discipline in them. A total of 104 cadets from around the state attended this year's encampment, including 13 cadets and three officers from the Martinsburg (W.Va.
EDUCATION
April 14, 2013
Since Hagerstown Community College received a $1.25 million U.S. Department of Education grant to start an Upward Bound program in fall 2012, 48 local high school students have been recruited to participate. The free program is designed to increase the high school graduation and college completion rates of low-income or first-generation college students. HCC is working in partnership with Washington County Public Schools to enhance evolving curricular changes that are designed to result in higher college attendance rates.
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