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Test Scores

NEWS
December 3, 2004
When the Washington County School Board gave Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan a 10 percent raise, we knew there would be some in the community who would say that it wasn't justified, that the money could be better spent elsewhere. We strongly disagree. Anyone who takes an objective look at what the system has achieved since Morgan's arrival must conclude that much progress has been made under her leadership. Since her arrival, there has been quantifiable improvement. Perhaps as important, she's evangelical in promoting the importance of public education and the critical role a quality public school system has in a prosperous, confident community.
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NEWS
June 24, 1997
Want to find out how your school system's per-pupil spending compares with other districts across the state? Or would you rather compare achievement test scores? If you live in Pennsylvania you can do both, via the Internet. It's a development that citizens interested in education and the maximum return on their tax dollars should applaud. In announcing the new system on Monday, Pennsylvania Education Secretary Eugene Hickok said that before the state set up the home page, citizens seeking local statistics - items ranging from district finances to test scores - had to first petition the local district.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | September 3, 2009
McCONNELLSBURG, Pa. -- Two Fulton County school districts made such strong improvements on their standardized test scores that they received recognition from Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell in August. Southern Fulton and Central Fulton school districts sent students and staff members to the state capitol, where they stood behind Rendell and comedian/actor Bill Cosby during a press conference. Southern Fulton ranked third and Central Fulton ranked 15th for the progress they made between 2002 and 2009.
NEWS
November 15, 2000
Jefferson rejects skipping exams By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson High School's practice of allowing students to skip semester exams in exchange for good attendance records has been voted down by the Jefferson County Board of Education. For at least two years, Jefferson High students who missed four days or fewer of school and who maintained an 80 percent average in a course were allowed to skip the final semester exam in the class, said Jefferson County Board of Education spokeswoman Liz Thompson.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | October 7, 2002
pepperb@herald-mail.com Hancock Elementary School received a $149,935 state grant for a literacy program beginning this school year. Achievement First, a Maryland Department of Education standardized reading and writing program, aims to bring students' test scores up to grade performance levels within a three-year period. Test scores improved last year, but Hancock Principal Donna Newcomer-Coble said she thinks with the new program they will get even better. Hancock and Fountaindale elementary schools, both Title I schools which get more state and federal funding due to poverty levels based on free and reduced meals, are working under the same type of state grant, said JoEtta Palcovitz-Brown, schools executive director of elementary education.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | October 25, 2009
WAYNESBORO, Pa.-- Candidates running for Waynesboro Area School Board will be facing a tight budget and underwhelming high school test scores if elected Nov. 3. The school board dipped into cash reserves to balance its 2009-10 budget and now faces a $250,000 shortfall because of state contributions not coming in as high as projected. Waynesboro Area Senior High School has been placed on a Pennsylvania Department of Education "warning" list for failing to meet benchmarks on standardized reading and math tests.
NEWS
December 4, 2004
Can't math be integrated into other subjects? To the editor: A recent story said that one Washington school had cut back on science and social studies instruction due to their students having low math test scores. They feel that if they drill math into students' heads then that will improve scores and everyone will be happy. Because we all know that better test scores mean better students. Wrong. In no way is this an attack on the school or the hard-working teachers.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | February 11, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com Changes and progress at Eastern Elementary School, in the wake of state attention on its low student test scores, were the focus of a presentation and tour of the school Tuesday. Principal Kathy Stiles saved until the end of a presentation her best news: While the school used to score regularly at or near the bottom when periodically compared to other county schools' scores, it recently scored above average in reading and math. The scores are from tests taken in late 2003, she said.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | July 2, 2003
pepperb@herald-mail.com New standards for county students will be set when the first round of state assessment results roll into the school system's computers next month, a heavy data load Robert Brown hopes to lighten for teachers and administrators. Brown, coordinator of testing and accountability for Washington County Public Schools, said school officials have been preparing for the release of the Maryland School Assessment proficiency standard by giving teachers easier access to the school system's updated data-tracking computer system, Abacus, and by training a group of specialized teachers to interpret the information the system tracks.
NEWS
January 10, 2002
Hardin opposes panel idea By TARA REILLY tarar@herald-mail.com Washington County School Board member J. Herbert Hardin said he opposes a community redistricting panel's recommendation that would send wealthier students from Potomac Heights and Paramount elementary schools to Fountaindale Elementary School in an attempt to balance the percentage of poor students at Fountaindale. He said the potential move is unfair, would have a negative effect on the youngsters from both schools and that the Potomac Heights and Paramount students would be used as a "tool" to boost test scores at Fountaindale.
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