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NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | April 11, 2007
Washington County Public Schools are doing "very well" and taking visible steps toward becoming a world class school system, Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan said during this morning's State of Education address in Hagerstown. The annual event is hosted by the Hagerstown-Washington County Chamber of Commerce. "I think we have some lofty goals," she said. "Are we (a world class school system) yet? No. Are we making progress? Absolutely. " School system staff gave the presentation on the state of education in Washington County before a group of about 50 at the Four Points Sheraton on Dual Highway.
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NEWS
May 15, 2010
The question posted Wednesday on The Herald-Mail's website was: Do you approve of a new Maryland law that bars public high schools in the state from automatically sending student scores on a widely used military aptitude test to recruiters? "Unless the parent signs a release or the student is 18, the test scores should not be automatically sent to recruiters. I agree with the new law. " "They won't automatically send your SATs anywhere without your authorization, so if you take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)
NEWS
By SHEILA HOTCHKIN | August 23, 1998
Admissions officers at four-year colleges throughout the Tri-State area say this year's freshmen have higher test scores and grade-point averages than those in previous years. They attribute the gains to improved programs and facilities, heightened reputations and individual recruiting efforts. "We're getting applicants from a market section we weren't getting before," said Joseph Cretella, dean of admissions at Shippensburg (Pa.) University. --cont. from news page -- U.S. News & World Report magazine named the school a 1998 best value, which Cretella said attracts stronger students from across the country.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | December 15, 2003
One student who left Eastern Elementary School last school year during the Maryland School Assessments indirectly has helped overturn a state decision that has held the Hagerstown school to a threatening standard this year. The Maryland State Department of Education told Washington County Public Schools officials in November that the 560-student school will not have to provide costly tutoring services for its students this year. Schools Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan has said it would cost the school system $1,100 per student to send them to be tutored by any of the 12 state-approved learning services.
NEWS
July 31, 2005
On the front page of today's newspaper are two stories about Bester Elementary School. They are the first of what will be many stories in a year-long series The Herald-Mail will produce about the school. For the next year, we will follow closely attempts by school administrators, teachers and parents to improve academic achievement at the school. Bester, at the intersection of South Potomac Street and Memorial Boulevard, holds title to some of the worst statistics in Washington County.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | June 2, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson High School students who boosted their test scores and attendance rates, leading the school out of a "seriously impaired status" last year, bid farewell to the institution Sunday. During their graduation ceremonies at Shepherd College, members of the class of 2003 were praised for their academic success. Principal Susan Wall said she felt a "touch of sadness" watching the estimated 394 graduates leave. She told students to never give up in their quest for excellence.
NEWS
July 13, 2000
Student achievement scores show improvement By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Fluctuating student populations in the Eastern Panhandle have kept teachers scurrying, but recent Sanford Achievement Test results in Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan counties show students are holding their own when it comes to matching up with their peers statewide in West Virginia and across the nation. The SAT measures a student's ability in the basic skills of reading, mathematics and language.
NEWS
June 6, 2010
Teachers should be a significant part of the discussion when it comes to improve public education To the editor: This is in response to the two-part series on Race to the Top and to Tim Rowland's recent column on merit pay for teachers. First, let's get this straight: teachers' unions are teachers. They are not some vague, self-interested, third-party. Teachers unions are composed of and led by teachers; their members are teachers. So, why don't teachers support merit pay or evaluations by students' test scores, which are what Race to the Top and Maryland's recently passed legislation promote?
NEWS
December 3, 2004
When the Washington County School Board gave Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan a 10 percent raise, we knew there would be some in the community who would say that it wasn't justified, that the money could be better spent elsewhere. We strongly disagree. Anyone who takes an objective look at what the system has achieved since Morgan's arrival must conclude that much progress has been made under her leadership. Since her arrival, there has been quantifiable improvement. Perhaps as important, she's evangelical in promoting the importance of public education and the critical role a quality public school system has in a prosperous, confident community.
NEWS
November 15, 2000
Jefferson rejects skipping exams By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson High School's practice of allowing students to skip semester exams in exchange for good attendance records has been voted down by the Jefferson County Board of Education. For at least two years, Jefferson High students who missed four days or fewer of school and who maintained an 80 percent average in a course were allowed to skip the final semester exam in the class, said Jefferson County Board of Education spokeswoman Liz Thompson.
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