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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | September 5, 2012
State achievement test scores sent home with Berkeley County students last week show across-the-board improvement, but officials readily admit more gains are needed. “We increased in 84 percent of the areas that are measured,” Assistant Superintendent for Instruction Margaret Kursey said in a recent interview. More than 11,000 Berkeley County students in grades three through 11 took the West Virginia Educational Standards Test 2, or WESTEST 2 this spring, according to Kursey.
OPINION
August 11, 2010
Coming off a string of impressive testing results, the Washington County Board of Education received a jolt recently when six schools failed to meet state proficiency standards as defined by test scores. Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan and Michael Markoe, assistant superintendent for staff and student support, both said the school system would not make excuses for the low scores and rededicate efforts to the task at hand. Still, excuses were in the air at the Central Office.
OPINION
July 18, 2011
Everyone familiar with No Child Left Behind knew this day would come - the day that a sizable number of local schools would fail to achieve the ever-higher standards prescribed by the decade-old federal law. Results released in late June for Washington County showed that 17 schools failed to achieve proficiency among at least one faction of third- through eighth-graders. That's up from six schools a year ago. School critics will be quick to pounce on the results, without mentioning that the standards for passing are higher than they were a year ago - and they will be higher again next year until, supposedly, 100 percent of our students will be proficient.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | September 15, 2004
tammyb@herald-mail.com Students in Washington County Public Schools showed a marked improvement this year in High School Assessment test scores over the previous year. According to numbers released Tuesday by the county school system, students raised their pass rates in all four subjects tested: English, biology, algebra and government. The most dramatic change came in English assessments, in which students posted a 10.6 percent increase from 2003 scores. State Superintendent of Schools Nancy Grasmick announced last week that test scores rose statewide; according to numbers released Tuesday, county students surpassed the state averages in three of the four categories, but lagged in English even with the higher numbers.
NEWS
By BRUCE HAMILTON | December 1, 1999
State test results indicate Washington County schools improved overall for the sixth straight year, jumping up in rank from 13th to eighth among Maryland's 24 school systems. cont. from front page Of the county students who took MSPAP exams in May, 51 percent scored at or above the state's satisfactory level. The composite score has risen each year since testing began in 1993, a total increase of 19 points. In an afternoon press conference, Schools Superintendent Herman G. Bartlett Jr. said the county has reached a tremendous milestone.
NEWS
October 1, 1997
By DAVE McMILLION Staff Writer Two years of improvement in assessment test scores at Northern Middle School landed the school a new $55,000 computer lab. The Maryland School Performance Assessment Program is an annual test given to students across the state to determine how well they are progressing. Last year, Gov. Parris Glendening decided that schools that show improvement in the tests two years in a row should be eligible for grants as a reward for their hard work, officials said.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | December 5, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County Schools officials have implemented a plan to help improve achievement test scores at Charles Town Middle School after more than 15 percent of the school's students performed below state standards on the test two years in a row, the superintendent said. The State Department of Education requires a school to have no more than 15 percent of its students testing in the lower quartile of the Stanford 9 achievement test, Superintendent of Schools R. Steven Nichols said.
NEWS
June 17, 2004
An increase in standardized test scores is always welcome, but Washington County's results also told a special success story about Eastern Elementary School. Eastern, with a large number of students from lower-income families who move in and out of the district each year, has had its share of problems in the recent past. In February 2002, the School Board rejected a redistricting committee's proposal to send 118 Eastern students elsewhere to ease overcrowding, opting to shift only 76. In May 2001, parents of Eastern students were given the option of transferring their children elsewhere under a new federal rule because state test scores had gone down there for the past two years.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | June 24, 2003
pepperb@herald-mail.com Eastern Elementary School could be required to take expensive steps when classes resume in the fall unless student test scores to be released in August show improvement, Washington County Public Schools Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan said Monday. She said those steps could be avoided by convincing the state that the school system is working to improve performance at Eastern and that test scores are on their way up. "We asked (the state) to consider us as a school improving rather than a school in 'improvement,'" Morgan said.
NEWS
By BRENDAN KIRBY | December 23, 1998
In past years, Donna Gelwicks spent hours typing information about her children's school and other schools throughout the state into her computer. When data from the Maryland School Performance Program Report was entered, she could print out graphs comparing Pangborn Elementary School with other schools in the county. There was no easy way to do this by flipping through the pages, Gelwicks said. On Tuesday that changed. Now, parents who are interested in their children's schools will not have to do nearly as much work.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
By LLOYD WATERS | September 23, 2012
I remember one time when I was in sixth grade at the old Dargan School, I had a major role in a school program. I decided to play hooky on that day because I had not remembered my lines, so I told my grandmother I was sick.  She told me to stay in bed. It wasn't too long after our conversation that there was a knock at the door. Principal Middlecamp had come down to my house to tell my grandmother that I had a major part in the school program and I was needed at school. The rest of the story is history.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | September 5, 2012
State achievement test scores sent home with Berkeley County students last week show across-the-board improvement, but officials readily admit more gains are needed. “We increased in 84 percent of the areas that are measured,” Assistant Superintendent for Instruction Margaret Kursey said in a recent interview. More than 11,000 Berkeley County students in grades three through 11 took the West Virginia Educational Standards Test 2, or WESTEST 2 this spring, according to Kursey.
OPINION
July 18, 2011
Everyone familiar with No Child Left Behind knew this day would come - the day that a sizable number of local schools would fail to achieve the ever-higher standards prescribed by the decade-old federal law. Results released in late June for Washington County showed that 17 schools failed to achieve proficiency among at least one faction of third- through eighth-graders. That's up from six schools a year ago. School critics will be quick to pounce on the results, without mentioning that the standards for passing are higher than they were a year ago - and they will be higher again next year until, supposedly, 100 percent of our students will be proficient.
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | December 30, 2010
As the New Year relentlessly presses its way into our consciousness each year, there is a predictable rash of articles with lists of wishes for the upcoming year. Some are humorous and are intended to evoke a chuckle, while others represent the vision of the writer for the future. The following are a few wishes I am hoping for.    First is a plea for less panic-filled articles about "The Failure of Our Public Schools. " Usually, these articles support their claims by comparing the test scores of European students with American students.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | September 25, 2010
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- A year after dropping 53 points, the average SAT score at Hancock Middle-Senior High School rose 85 points last school year, the largest gain within Washington County Public Schools. Three other high schools -- Smithsburg, Washington County Technical and South Hagerstown -- had gains of about 50 points. School system officials distributed school-by-school averages last week as they discussed newly released SAT results. Overall, Washington County's average SAT score rose 26 points last year, from 1,480 to 1,506.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | September 13, 2010
A year after Washington County Public Schools officials expressed concern about a drop in the average SAT score, the school system's average SAT score improved 26 points. The average SAT score last school year was 1,506, compared with 1,480 during the 2008-09 school year, and with 1,508 during the 2007-08 school year, according to Jeremy Jakoby, the school system's supervisor of testing and accountability. "While we are very aware that one year does not constitute a trend, we are optimistic about these results," Schools Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan said in a prepared statement.
OPINION
August 11, 2010
Coming off a string of impressive testing results, the Washington County Board of Education received a jolt recently when six schools failed to meet state proficiency standards as defined by test scores. Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan and Michael Markoe, assistant superintendent for staff and student support, both said the school system would not make excuses for the low scores and rededicate efforts to the task at hand. Still, excuses were in the air at the Central Office.
NEWS
August 9, 2010
The time has come for charity to begin at home To the editor: This letter is in reference to The Herald-Mail article on Aug. 3, "BOE, administrators try to find cause of disappointing MSA results. " Several weeks ago, Washington County Public Schools Superintendent Betty Morgan voiced her support for tying teacher pay to performance. She stated in The Herald-Mail article that once the teachers understood, they would jump on board. Yet, poor teacher performance was not given as a reason for the drop in MSA results.
NEWS
May 15, 2010
The question posted Wednesday on The Herald-Mail's website was: Do you approve of a new Maryland law that bars public high schools in the state from automatically sending student scores on a widely used military aptitude test to recruiters? "Unless the parent signs a release or the student is 18, the test scores should not be automatically sent to recruiters. I agree with the new law. " "They won't automatically send your SATs anywhere without your authorization, so if you take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)
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