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Tears

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SPORTS
By MARK KELLER | September 7, 2011
One of the most immortal quotes about America's grand old game came from a totally fictional movie character. “There's no crying in baseball.” That line, spoken by Tom Hanks (as Jimmy Dugan) in “A League Of Their Own,” became the most memorable in the film and is now trotted out at the first sign of tears at a ball diamond. But if you've ever watched Little League Baseball, you know that statement isn't accurate at all. There is crying in baseball, particularly at the Little League level.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | June 10, 2009
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- The Waynesboro Area Senior High School graduation ceremony had just begun when Stephanie Scott's right foot began to bounce anxiously. Her eyes quickly welled up with tears. Stephanie, 17, had predicted it would happen. "I'm crazy nervous because I'm going to cry," she said before entering the gymnasium Wednesday. Family and friends filled the gym and watched a video feed in the auditorium for the school's 127th commencement, in which 264 students participated.
NEWS
By JONATHAN R. BURRS | January 21, 2008
It is a sad day for American politics when a candidate for president can generate enough "sympathy support" to win a state primary race simply by manufacturing a few tears. This was the case in the New Hampshire 2008 Democratic primary race on Jan. 8. Hillary Clinton broke down in tears, while responding to a reporter's question, after losing the Iowa Caucuses and going into the New Hampshire primaries as a double-digit underdog behind Sen. Barack Obama. Although some American voters are highly sophisticated, many American voters want to believe in the inherent good of their candidates and do not realize that they, the voters, are being swayed by strategies designed for politicians by "spin doctors," with the focus of gaining support for their campaigns, not proposing solutions to the many urgent issues requiring America's immediate attention in the political world today.
NEWS
January 29, 2007
Accusation of this youngster was far too harsh To the editor: A friend sent me a clipping from your morning paper, "School accuses 5-year-old of sex harassment" by Erin Cunningham. I question the quality of education your young people are getting if this is an example. The principal or mentor or teacher or whoever witnessed the "pinch" could simply have told the child not to do that. The school board should never have condoned the accusation. Surely a little common sense would have made someone realize that they were dealing with a 5-year-old.
LIFESTYLE
By Zoe Decker | Teen division winner | October 27, 2011
I wake up in the dead of night. There is sweat beaded along my forehead, my heart feels as if it will burst from my chest. My breathing is quick and heavy. I think about my dream, or as I should put it, my nightmare. I remember his cries for help, his face twisted in pain and terror. I realize I have to go to him, to go where I never wanted to ever go again. To his prison. The prison is dark and cold. Even from the outside I could hear his twisted cries and screams of agony. As I walk down the halls, his screams filling the vacant void, filling me with pain too. I finally reach the center where he is held.
NEWS
Bill Kohler | September 12, 2012
There's no crying in baseball? It was one of those moments when something just happens without any warning or buildup. It was hard to explain why it happened and what sparked it. I shed tears of joy. Yes, is this what I've come to in my mid-40s? Writing my first column in a couple of months about how I've become a bawling, babbling buffoon in middle age? No, this is not what this column is about. It's about baseball, of course. The tears - well at least the lump in my throat, the moistness of my eyes and the sogginess of the sleeve of my T-shirt - arrived last Friday morning as I sat in this very seat at home watching highlights on my laptop of the Orioles beating the Yankees on the night they unveiled the Cal Ripken Jr. statue at Camden Yards.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | June 6, 2008
MERCERSBURG, PA. -- They once dreamed of being actors, doctors, lawyers, stuntmen and cheerleaders, and Friday, the James Buchanan High School class of 2008 stepped into the "real world" where, as each commencement speaker reminded them, anything, especially their dream, is possible. After 18 years of waiting for the day their names would be announced as graduates, the class of 2008 could not hold out until the end of the ceremony to celebrate. Each speech offered to the group only prompted more beach balls and strings of sticky foam to soar across the caps of fellow graduates seated in neat rows on the field at Rocket Stadium.
NEWS
By JONATHAN R. BURRS | March 8, 2008
Did someone say challenge? There is nothing that captures my attention better than hearing two words: Smorgasbord and challenge. I accept the friendly challenge presented to me in Sharon Womack's letter to the editor, "Hillary wept? So did Jesus. " I appreciate all the feedback from those who read my columns. However, Womack's letter particularly resonates with me primarily because I agree with most of her points, with one particular exception. As I explained in the original column, voters want to believe in the inherent good of their candidates and often do not recognize it when the "spin doctors" are at work.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | August 13, 2003
marlob@herald-mail.com Two months ago, 87 of the 88 members of the Clear Spring High School Class of 2003 graduated. Tuesday night, the final diploma was awarded to Karen Ann Worthington, who fought hard to finally cross that stage. More than 200 friends mingled with family and nearly half of her fellow graduates to celebrate her life after a near-fatal auto accident on June 10. "I never expected this," Worthington said, choking back tears. "All of you seem like family to me now. Thanks for making my life great.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | December 29, 2006
MONT ALTO, PA. - Edward L. Shaffer read over a note from his grandson's comrades through tears Thursday morning as he spoke of U.S. Army Sgt. Edward W. "Eddie" Shaffer's death Wednesday at a Texas military hospital. Eddie Shaffer, 23, of Mont Alto, succumbed to his injuries Wednesday at Brooke Army Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas, where he was being treated for critical burns sustained in a Nov. 13 roadside bomb blast in Ramadi, Iraq. In a phone interview Thursday morning, Edward L. Shaffer read over a card he received from members of Eddie Shaffer's platoon still stationed in Iraq.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 10, 2013
'Bucky' remembered with memorial at ballpark To the editor: On Sunday, June 30, a memorial service was held at the Sharpsburg ballpark for our beloved “Bucky,” the Sharpsburg-area deer who died so tragically, with 83 people attending. A monument was put in place honoring “Bucky” and 30 trees were planted along a dangerous fence row. The ballpark was one of the places that “Bucky” visited quite often to see the kids and enjoy the treats that were offered.
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NEWS
April 24, 2013
The Hagerstown City Council on Tuesday approved the allocation of more than $72,000 for the demolition of the section of the former Holiday Motel on North Prospect Street. The city approved the purchase of properties at 170 W. Washington St. and 12 N. Prospect St. at a cost of $27,500 in February. Only the vacant three-story brick section, formerly the motel's restaurant and a portion of the motel, along Prospect Street will be demolished, according to city documents. The white brick building along West Washington Street will remain intact.
SPORTS
January 20, 2013
It used to be so easy. Back when I was a kid, all you did was flick on the TV and sit and watch sports. You were moved, inspired and driven to be just like those guys, those athletes who dazzled you with their brilliance. They were role models - or so we thought - because all those athletes were great talents, engaging with their followers and giving an image of being the perfect person. Back then. This is probably the point where I sound like I'm slipping back to that forbidden land.
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | January 2, 2013
The owner of the former Municipal Electric Light Plant wants to tear down the blighted building in Hagerstown's East End just as badly as city officials do, he said last week. David Harshman, the property's owner since 1996, said on Dec. 26 that he and his demolition contractor, Bud Williams of Lycoming Supply based in Williamsport, Pa., have put in “hundreds of hours” in the past few years trying to make the project work. “We're not here to make controversy at all,” Williams said.
NEWS
Bill Kohler | September 12, 2012
There's no crying in baseball? It was one of those moments when something just happens without any warning or buildup. It was hard to explain why it happened and what sparked it. I shed tears of joy. Yes, is this what I've come to in my mid-40s? Writing my first column in a couple of months about how I've become a bawling, babbling buffoon in middle age? No, this is not what this column is about. It's about baseball, of course. The tears - well at least the lump in my throat, the moistness of my eyes and the sogginess of the sleeve of my T-shirt - arrived last Friday morning as I sat in this very seat at home watching highlights on my laptop of the Orioles beating the Yankees on the night they unveiled the Cal Ripken Jr. statue at Camden Yards.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | April 22, 2012
“The Holocaust wasn't something far away. The lives of many people in our own community have been and continue to be affected by what happened to them,” said Rabbi Jill Hackell of Congregation Sons of Israel Synagogue in Chambersburg. She led Sunday's 34th annual Holocaust Memorial Service, sponsored by the United Churches of the Chambersburg Area. “From the generation who were themselves witnesses and from the next generation - the children of survivors. It's through our stories that we and future generations will learn to say, 'never again,'” Hackell said.
LIFESTYLE
By Zoe Decker | Teen division winner | October 27, 2011
I wake up in the dead of night. There is sweat beaded along my forehead, my heart feels as if it will burst from my chest. My breathing is quick and heavy. I think about my dream, or as I should put it, my nightmare. I remember his cries for help, his face twisted in pain and terror. I realize I have to go to him, to go where I never wanted to ever go again. To his prison. The prison is dark and cold. Even from the outside I could hear his twisted cries and screams of agony. As I walk down the halls, his screams filling the vacant void, filling me with pain too. I finally reach the center where he is held.
SPORTS
By MARK KELLER | September 7, 2011
One of the most immortal quotes about America's grand old game came from a totally fictional movie character. “There's no crying in baseball.” That line, spoken by Tom Hanks (as Jimmy Dugan) in “A League Of Their Own,” became the most memorable in the film and is now trotted out at the first sign of tears at a ball diamond. But if you've ever watched Little League Baseball, you know that statement isn't accurate at all. There is crying in baseball, particularly at the Little League level.
LIFESTYLE
By TAYLOR ECKEL | taylor.eckel@herald-mail.com | August 15, 2011
Sterling Christy's varsity basketball debut ended with eight seconds left in the game. His team, Williamsport High School, was winning when he tangled with a Brunswick player. "He grabbed me by my shoulders and twisted me down," Sterling said. "My leg got caught in his, and I felt it pop. " The "pop" Sterling felt is the hallmark of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, an injury that is far too familiar to many high school coaches and athletes. ACL injuries can be caused by contact with an opponent or when an athlete lands from a jump, stops or changes direction with bad form.
SPORTS
By KYLE RAIOS | Staff Correspondent | July 7, 2011
Hot on the heels of Wednesday’s scoring bonanza, the Conococheague 11-12 All-Stars stayed hot through the rain to emerge victorious over Hancock 10-0 on Thursday in the Maryland District 1 Tournament. Conococheague — which defeated South Mountain 30-2 in the first round Wednesday — played visitor in its own park Thursday after the coin toss, and jumped ahead early with the clouds looming over. Levi Taylor homered for a 1-0 lead in the top of the first. Jake Arnone, who had four homers Wednesday, kept his bat glowing hot, ripping a single to left before scoring on Gage Kyler’s deep shot to left, which made it 3-0 Conococheague.
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