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Surveillance

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OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | July 14, 2013
“If I'm not doing anything wrong, why should I care about surveillance?” To quote the late David Foster Wallace, this argument is so stupid it practically drools. So allow me to count the ways: 1. Just because you have nothing to hide today doesn't mean you will have nothing to hide tomorrow. Legislatures are always passing new laws against what was heretofore rather normal behavior. One community tried to pass an ordinance requiring its citizens to carry a gun. See any problem there, especially if you don't care to pack heat?
NEWS
March 27, 2009
ANNAPOLIS (AP) -- Maryland lawmakers have approved legislation designed to prevent authorities from violating First Amendment rights with covert police surveillance. The House of Delegates and Senate approved similar bills on Friday. Delegate Sandy Rosenberg, D-Baltimore, says the minor differences between the measures should be easily resolvable. The legislation was put forward in response to Maryland State Police surveillance that resulted in dozens of people wrongly being described as terrorists in a police database.
NEWS
August 26, 2008
BALTIMORE (AP) -- The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland claims in a court filing that Maryland State Police officials have not released all documents related to the 14-month infiltration or monitoring of anti-death penalty and peace activist groups. The ACLU filed a Public Information Act lawsuit against the state police in June that first detailed the surveillance operation. The state police's attorney, Sharon Benzil, says the suit is moot because all documents have been released and the plaintiffs waited too long to sue. However, ACLU attorney David Rocah says only summaries of the surveillance logs were released, not actual reports.
NEWS
July 24, 2008
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The congressman who heads the committee overseeing the Department of Homeland Security is asking for a review of the agency's involvement in Maryland State Police surveillance of anti-war and death penalty opposition groups. "The politically motivated surveillance of dissident domestic groups that have neither a link to terrorism nor promote violence is ... a deplorable use of taxpayer funds," Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Mississippi, wrote in a letter to Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff.
NEWS
July 31, 2008
ANNAPOLIS (AP) -- A group headed by a former Maryland attorney general will examine state trooper surveillance of anti-war and death-penalty opposition groups to try to prevent such actions in the future, the governor said Thursday. Gov. Martin O'Malley called for the review, naming former Maryland Attorney General Stephen Sachs to lead it. It will take 30 to 60 days and will examine state police practices over 14 months in 2005 and 2006, before O'Malley was governor. Sachs, who served as attorney general in the late 1970s and the 1980s, said the purpose of the review is "to discover the unvarnished truth about what happened and what didn't happen.
NEWS
September 30, 2008
BALTIMORE (AP) -- The Maryland chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union says it will file public information requests to determine if state police surveilled activist groups other than those it has already admitted to tracking. ACLU attorney David Rocah said Tuesday that the requests cover groups that advocate for a variety of issues, including two that have learned that they were under police surveillance. Rocah says the other groups may have been surveilled based on the reasons state police gave for the surveillance of the anti-war and death penalty opposition groups.
NEWS
August 4, 2008
Last week's question: An American Civil Liberties Union lawsuit revealed that a unit of the Maryland State Police spent 14 months in 2005 and 2006 doing surveillance on people who opposed the death penalty and the Iraq war. Is there any good reason for this? o People who get passionate about causes sometimes get violent. - 7 votes (6 percent) o You never know who's doing something wrong unless you watch them for a while. - 9 votes (8 percent) o No, it violates the U.S. Constitution's guarantee that the people may peacefully protest government activities.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | July 11, 2008
GREENCASTLE, Pa. -The Borough of Greencastle will soon have a few eyes in the sky. In a unanimous vote Monday, the Borough Council accepted a bid to purchase a $5,742 video surveillance system from Bowers Home Security in Greencastle to monitor activity at Borough Hall, the police station and, perhaps in the future, the streets of the borough. Purchasing an expandable system large enough to support additional cameras was important to members of council. Councilman Craig Myers said the council would pay for the convenience of an expandable system, but that the initial expense could save the borough money down the road.
NEWS
by STACEY DANZUSO | October 30, 2002
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Franklin County will use $25,000 in grant money to upgrade surveillance and radio equipment for the county Drug Task Force. This is the first time the county has requested a share of the Local Law Enforcement Block Grant money that Chambersburg receives annually from the state, said Kelly Livermore, assistant county administrator. The county will use $4,000 for a repeater with a rechargeable batter and an antenna to enhance existing equipment the task force detectives use to conduct surveillance during investigations into illegal drug activity, said Assistant District Attorney Angela Krom, whose office oversees the task force.
NEWS
July 23, 1997
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY Staff Writer Brian Hamberger already had a surveillance system in his Potomac Avenue 7-Eleven store when The Southland Corporation installed a new high-tech system about two years ago. Instead of scrapping his cruder black-and-white system, Hamberger said he decided to use it to expand video coverage to other areas of his store. It has helped him catch a few shoplifters, he said. But that's just a bonus on top of the deterrent and security benefits provided by the newer surveillance and alarm system, which gives employees a one-touch link to police agencies and provides a record of activity in the store, Hamberger said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | July 14, 2013
“If I'm not doing anything wrong, why should I care about surveillance?” To quote the late David Foster Wallace, this argument is so stupid it practically drools. So allow me to count the ways: 1. Just because you have nothing to hide today doesn't mean you will have nothing to hide tomorrow. Legislatures are always passing new laws against what was heretofore rather normal behavior. One community tried to pass an ordinance requiring its citizens to carry a gun. See any problem there, especially if you don't care to pack heat?
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OPINION
By GEORGE MICHAEL | June 13, 2013
There is a deep and pervasive disease in the current presidential administration. Hope and Change has turned into Hype and Chance. In last Saturday's Herald-Mail, an AP article recounted the president's defense of our government's massive sweep of phone calls and Internet information. The article even took pains to refer to Obama as “a constitutional lawyer.” And I thought he was only a community organizer. It turns out that not only is he the president, but “a constitutional lawyer” to boot.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | May 22, 2013
A surveillance system operated by the Hagerstown Police Department will have “smart-camera” technology featuring motion-activated capabilities and will allow officers to view the department's more than 100 cameras on laptop computers in their cruisers, Hagerstown Police Chief Mark Holtzman said Tuesday. The enhancements were made possible after Hagerstown City Council members Tuesday night approved a $162,043 expenditure for the new system. The money comes from a $900,000 COPS Tech grant that previously was awarded to the police department.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | December 3, 2012
A Sharpsburg man charged last week with illegal possession of firearms is a "doomsday prepper" who told an undercover Maryland State Police trooper about an underground bunker and surveillance cameras on his property, according to a charging document filed in Washington County District Court. Terry Allen Porter, 46, of 4433 Mills Road, Sharpsburg, was charged Friday with seven counts each of being a convicted felon in possession of a rifle or shotgun and possession of firearms after being convicted of a disqualifying offense, court records said.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | November 29, 2012
A coalition says it has gathered a wealth of helpful information about Washington County health-care needs. The Health Improvement Coalition's work hopefully will lead to positive changes, said co-chair Allen Twigg, the director of behavioral sciences for Meritus Health. The group capped a yearlong period of research by releasing a report on its findings on Thursday at Robinwood Professional Center. In January, the coalition - which includes representatives from several local health and social-service organizations - held a community health summit.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | October 24, 2012
A Washington County Circuit judge this week granted a preliminary injunction to Wells House against the City of Hagerstown and the police department regarding a search of the drug treatment facility in an assault case. “The net of protection cast over an entity such as Wells House is quite broad,” Judge John H. McDowell said during Tuesday's hearing. Federal and state laws provide for the confidentiality of patient information in such facilities, he said. “My interpretation is that the judge's order simply refers to the records and tangible property taken with the search warrant,” City Attorney Bill Nairn said Wednesday.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | January 10, 2012
A surveillance photo published in The Herald-Mail resulted in the arrest of a man suspected in an armed robbery and an attempted armed robbery, according to charging documents filed in Washington County District Court. Sean Eric Scott, 41, of no fixed address was charged with the robbery Saturday at the Motel 6 on Massey Boulevard and an attempted holdup on Friday at the 7-Eleven on Salem Ave., court records said. Scott also is charged with a Dec. 27 theft, court records said. Scott was being held Tuesday in the Washington County Detention Center on $1,007,500 bond on the three cases, the records said.
NEWS
September 2, 2011
Martinsburg police say they have video-surveillance photographs of a man they believe is responsible for stealing copper tubing from several air-conditioning units. The thefts were reported Thursday at Oatsdale Little League Park, a business on Williamsport Pike and the Ebenezer Baptist Church at 615 W. Main St., according to a Martinsburg Police Department news release. The damage to the air-conditioning unit at the Williamsport Pike business was estimated at more than $2,500, police said.
NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | September 21, 2010
Gov. Manchin tours new Morgan County Courthouse 5 Eastern Panhandle residents inducted into Order of the 35th Star BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. -- A hazardous-duty robot worth about $150,000 was donated Tuesday to the West Virginia State Police by Berkeley Springs Instruments (BSI) for use in the Eastern Panhandle. The owner of the robot, Berkeley Springs Instruments, was one of 10 businesses in Morgan County that received recognition Tuesday from West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III. A ceremony was held on the front steps of Citizens National Bank, but a robot demonstration for Manchin had to be canceled because of a mechanical problem with the robot's arms.
NEWS
August 19, 2010
Hagerstown police have released video surveillance photos taken during an armed robbery Aug. 11 at the 7-Eleven convenience store at 802 Salem Ave. The robbery was reported at about 3:25 a.m., police said in a news release. A man entered the store, produced a handgun and took an undisclosed amount of money from the cash register before fleeing the scene, police said. The man was about 20 to 25 years old and was wearing a black shirt and blue pants, according to the release.
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