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NEWS
By ROBERT SNYDER | May 10, 2006
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. ? In a decision that could serve as a precursor to the outcome of next year's expected zoning referendum, Berkeley County Republicans voted to reject the candidacy of former West Virginia lawmaker Larry Faircloth, and opted instead to select county Public Service Water District Chairman Bill Stubblefield as the party's nominee to replace departing Berkeley County Commissioner Howard Strauss on the three-member County Commission....
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | December 20, 2012
Berkeley County Council President William L. “Bill” Stubblefield said at what was his last county council meeting Thursday that his six years in the elected office were “a good ride.” Stubblefield, 72, said he plans to remain involved in the community, but indicated he has no intention to run for another elected office. “I'll take a couple months to rewind,” Stubblefield said after being lauded for his leadership and service at the end of Thursday's regular meeting.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | March 11, 2008
GERRARDSTOWN, W.Va. - There is no peace around Mt. Olive Church in Gerrardstown. A brick manufacturer's proposed quarrying operation envisioned near the historic house of worship has been anything but a calming development in the last several months for this southern Berkeley County community. Rumors late last year of plans by Continental Brick Co. in Martinsburg, W.Va., to establish a more than 200-acre quarry site near the town off W.Va. 51 and Dominion Road have since been validated, alarming residents who are banding together to fight the project.
NEWS
April 15, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - The Berkeley County Commission has not set aside money for potential lawsuits stemming from the possible adoption of zoning, but Commissioner William L. "Bill" Stubblefield said Monday that enforcing the new land-use regulations "should be self-sustaining" and not result in a tax increase. Stubblefield said a schedule of fees for zoning applications and other land-use permits has been proposed by the county's planning department director as a means to cover costs of employing people to handle zoning matters.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | August 23, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A federal retiree has volunteered to help the Berkeley County Commission with grant programs. The commission on Thursday appeared to be inclined to accept the offer by Niles Bernick, 69, of Falling Waters, W.Va., pending approval of a formal agreement. Commissioner William L. "Bill" Stubblefield said Bernick approached him at the Berkeley County Youth Fair about helping county officials with grant writing. The formal agreement will establish a "legal vehicle" to compensate Bernick for travel and other miscellaneous expenses, but not for salary or benefits, Stubblefield said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | June 13, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - The Berkeley County Commission replaced a Berkeley County lawmaker on the Eastern Panhandle Regional Planning and Development Council (Region 9) on Thursday. Del. Jonathan Miller, R-Berkeley, indicated in writing that he wished to be re-appointed, but County Commissioner William L. "Bill" Stubblefield made the motion to replace him with Elizabeth Layne Diehl, provost of the Martinsburg campus of Mountain State University. Diehl's appointment to Miller's seat on the Eastern Panhandle board on Thursday was unanimously approved by the Commission.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | August 20, 2010
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- Berkeley County's administrative office building in Martinsburg was evacuated Friday morning after an employee discovered white powder, later determined to be a sweetener, in an envelope, according to police and county officials. Berkeley County Fire Board office administrator Donna Cross said she told the staff member who opened the envelope in the office at 400 W. Stephen St. to lay it on the desk and go wash her hands. "It was a little scary this morning," Cross said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | March 12, 2012
Berkeley County's preliminary spending plan for the next fiscal year includes funding set aside to hire two additional paid firefighters full time. The firefighters would be based at Baker Heights Volunteer Fire Department, which requested the county's help after demonstrating “a real need” for manpower, particularly on weekdays, according to Berkeley Council President William L. “Bill” Stubblefield. The additional firefighters would leave only Hedgesville and Back Creek volunteer fire departments without paid staff.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | December 20, 2012
Berkeley County Council President William L. “Bill” Stubblefield said at what was his last county council meeting Thursday that his six years in the elected office were “a good ride.” Stubblefield, 72, said he plans to remain involved in the community, but indicated he has no intention to run for another elected office. “I'll take a couple months to rewind,” Stubblefield said after being lauded for his leadership and service at the end of Thursday's regular meeting.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | September 20, 2012
A Berkeley County employee's position was eliminated Thursday due to a lack of work for the individual, county officials said. The Berkeley County Council voted 5-0 to eliminate a geographic information system technician position, effective Oct. 5. Berkeley County Administrator Deborah Hammond declined to immediately identify the employee because she said the individual was unaware that the reduction in force had been made. “It has been evaluated and studied for a while,” Hammond said of the decision, which came after the council held an executive session on personnel at the end of Thursday's regular meeting.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | June 29, 2012
Two Berkeley County employees could lose their jobs because federal funding for a program that the Berkeley County Council used to hire them has been cut, officials said Thursday. Less than three weeks ago, the council voted 3-1 to hire an assistant for Litter Control/Code Enforcement Officer Donna Seiler through the Employment Subsidy Program administered by WorkForce West Virginia. The county had agreed to pay $13,443 in benefits to the employee and was to be reimbursed for the employee's salary of $26,063, officials have said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | March 12, 2012
Berkeley County's preliminary spending plan for the next fiscal year includes funding set aside to hire two additional paid firefighters full time. The firefighters would be based at Baker Heights Volunteer Fire Department, which requested the county's help after demonstrating “a real need” for manpower, particularly on weekdays, according to Berkeley Council President William L. “Bill” Stubblefield. The additional firefighters would leave only Hedgesville and Back Creek volunteer fire departments without paid staff.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | June 17, 2011
The director of the county farmland board updated the Berkeley County Council Thursday on the status of the sprawling Boydville estate. The Berkeley County Farmland Protection Board acquired Boydville in 2005 for $2.25 million. The purchase, undertaken to stop proposed residential development on the leafy 13-acre property at 601 S. Queen St., was made with the assistance of $750,000 from the city of Martinsburg. Since then, the farmland board has been unsuccessful in finding a new use for the estate, which includes a circa-1812 mansion that was spared by direct order of President Abraham Lincoln in the Civil War. Robert "Bob" White, executive director of the board, told council members that the board had spent a "substantial amount" of money on maintaining the grounds of the estate and the mansion, but could not provide a more precise figure when council President William L. "Bill" Stubblefield asked for it. Stubblefield applauded the board's efforts regarding Boydville, but encouraged the board to "aggressively" work to determine the estate's future for the long term.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | June 16, 2011
The director of the county farmland board updated the Berkeley County Council Thursday on the status of the sprawling Boydville estate. The Berkeley County Farmland Protection Board acquired Boydville in 2005 for $2.25 million. The purchase, undertaken to stop proposed residential development on the leafy 13-acre property at 601 S. Queen St., was made with the assistance of $750,000 from the city of Martinsburg. Since then, the farmland board has been unsuccessful in finding a new use for the estate, which includes a circa-1812 mansion that was spared by direct order of President Abraham Lincoln in the Civil War. Robert "Bob" White, farmland protection board director, told council members that the board had spent a “substantial amount” of money on maintaining the grounds of the estate and the mansion, but could not provide a more precise figure when council President William L. “Bill” Stubblefield asked for it. Stubblefield applauded the board’s efforts regarding Boydville, but encouraged the board to “aggressively” work to determine the estate’s future for the long term.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | December 16, 2010
Macy's Inc. stands to receive a tax break worth between $10 million and $11 million if the department store giant follows through with its plan to build a $150 million distribution center in Berkeley County, officials said Thursday. The Berkeley County Commission Thursday approved an agreement that delays Macy's obligation to pay taxes in full until after a Payment In Lieu of Taxes agreement - worth $11.25 million to the county - expires in 2028. Macy's said it needs the distribution center to meet growing Internet sales in the eastern United States.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | September 24, 2010
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. --The Berkeley County Commission on Thursday tentatively agreed to host a town hall-like meeting in the northern end of the county the evening of Oct. 7 as part of one commissioner's community outreach initiative. "If we get five people, we get five people, at least we're out there," said Commissioner Anthony J. "Tony" Petrucci, who campaigned on the issue two years ago when he was elected to a six-year term. The location for the informational session has not been set, but Petrucci expects a few issues pertinent to north end communities, including Spring Mills, Bedington, Falling Waters and Marlowe, will be part of an agenda that includes an opportunity for residents to comment and give feedback.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | August 20, 2010
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- Berkeley County's administrative office building in Martinsburg was evacuated Friday morning after an employee discovered white powder, later determined to be a sweetener, in an envelope, according to police and county officials. Berkeley County Fire Board office administrator Donna Cross said she told the staff member who opened the envelope in the office at 400 W. Stephen St. to lay it on the desk and go wash her hands. "It was a little scary this morning," Cross said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | April 10, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- The Berkeley County Commission voted 2-1 on Thursday to reclassify the jobs of two employees, a decision that added more than $10,000 to the commission's budget for payroll. Commissioner Anthony J. "Tony" Petrucci voted against the measure, saying he had reservations about approving what amounted to $4,550 and $6,270 pay raises during an ongoing budget crunch and added that a lot of other employees are deserving of a raise. Even after the reclassification, facilities department worker Lewis B. Palmer and code enforcement inspector Donna L. Seiler will still earn less than $30,000 annually, according to the requests filed by their respective department supervisors.
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