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NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | January 14, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Broadening the park's scope beyond John Brown and Lower Town to opening the visitors' parking lot during the off-season to commuters who ride the MARC train were just two ideas voiced Tuesday night during a meeting about the future of Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. National Park Service officials are working on a new General Management Plan for the park to guide the park through the next 20 years. The current plan has not been updated for a quarter of a century.
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NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | June 26, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com Harpers Ferry, W.Va., the place where the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers meet, also is the site of many significant moments in American history. On Saturday, June 28, the area's rich past will be stirred up with re-enacted history and some jazz from accomplished musicians who have not played together before. The cultural heritage program They Passed This Way: A Celebration of Cultural Heritage will begin at 11 a.m. Dick Cheatham will present "Meriwether Lewis Returns to Harpers Ferry," focusing on the 200th anniversary of the explorer's 1803 visit to the town where he was equipped and outfitted for his historic cross-continent expedition with William Clark and the Corps of Discovery.
NEWS
June 24, 2003
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Harpers Ferry National Historical Park will host "They Passed This Way," a celebration of cultural heritage, Saturday, June 28, from 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. The event will include living history displays and demonstrations. Presentations by Colonial Williamsburg actor Bill Barker as Thomas Jefferson and Dick Cheatham as Meriwether Lewis will focus on the 200th anniversary of Meriwether Lewis' visit to Harpers Ferry in preparation for the Lewis and Clark Expedition.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | February 3, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Nnamdi Azikiwe had many distinguishing qualities, not the least of which was being Nigeria's first democratically-elected president. Azikiwe was also a writer and newspaper editor, a career he used to promote pride and nationalism in Nigerians. A talented athlete with impressive physical features, Azikiwe excelled in soccer and high jumping, and his strong voice made him an effective public speaker, friends said Sunday at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | June 27, 2002
katec@herald-mail.com American history is a work in progress. Harpers Ferry's part in that history in the years beyond 1776 are explored by "Freedom's Birth, an American Experience. " For the first time, the annual celebration will feature jazz - sometimes called America's only original art form. "What we've tried to do is to include elements of music that have had significance to Harpers Ferry history," says Todd Bolton, branch chief of visitor services at the park. That takes event planners directly to Storer College graduate Don Redman, known as the first great arranger in jazz history.
NEWS
By CLYDE FORD | March 24, 1998
Principal remembered fondly CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Irma Mosell Patrick, 94, the first black woman to serve as a principal at a Jefferson County public school, died Friday in Cleveland. Former students and teachers remembered Patrick, an educator for 44 years, as a dedicated professional who expected the best from her students. Patrick was principal of Eagle Avenue Elementary from 1950 to 1966. "She was very disciplined and loving at the same time," said James Tolbert, president of the Jefferson County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, who was a second-grade student of hers.
NEWS
February 22, 1997
By DAVE McMILLION Staff Writer, Martinsburg MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - J.R. Clifford is not well-known here, but residents this week will have a chance to learn more about the attorney who fought for equal rights for black students in the late 1800s. It wasn't until 1954 that the Supreme Court struck down segregated schools in its landmark Brown vs. Board of Education decision, but Clifford tackled the issue in 1896. Berkeley County Circuit Court Judge David Sanders and others have scheduled a free historical presentation on Clifford's life for Friday.
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