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NEWS
September 5, 2008
First Friday CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- Music in several locations, activities for kids, and artists displaying and selling their work along Chambersburg's Main Street. 5 to 8 p.m. today. Downtown Chambersburg. Call Tina Flohr at 717-261-0072. Friday After 5 WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Music by Boro Boogie Pickers. Firetruck and child ID program, sidewalk sales and discounts, food, face painting and more. 5 to 8 p.m. today. Downtown Waynesboro. Wind Down Friday Night Flat Stanley performs.
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NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | June 26, 2008
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- Jazz artist Jimmy Cobb, the drummer from Miles Davis' masterpiece "Kind of Blue," will give a free concert Saturday in Harpers Ferry. Cobb and acclaimed bassist Jymie Merritt, who collaborated with Max Roach and Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers, are the recipients of this year's Don Redman Heritage Award, given to living jazz artists who, like the award's namesake, were innovators of jazz. The Howard Burns Quartet will open the outdoor concert and also perform with Cobb and Merritt.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | June 26, 2008
Legendary jazz bassist Jymie Merritt's performance at the Don Redman Heritage Awards & Concert in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., will be his first show away from Philadelphia in more than a decade. "I decided I would make this my premiere move," said Merritt, 82, of Philadelphia. Merritt will join Jimmy Cobb at Saturday's concert on the lawn behind the Stephen T. Mather Training Center (formerly the campus of Storer College) in Harpers Ferry. Merritt said it's been years since he's played with Cobb, who was Miles Davis' drummer during the 1950s and into the '60s.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | January 31, 2008
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - People know about the NAACP, they've probably heard of its founder, W.E.B. DuBois, but "you'd be hard-pressed to find anyone who's heard of Lafayette Hershaw," said Park Ranger Kim Biggs. Hershaw was among the early civil rights activists willing to put his life and livelihood on the line for a single belief - that all people were created equal. Harpers Ferry National Historical Park will pay tribute to Hershaw at a February exhibit at John Brown Museum, entitled "Pioneers for Freedom.
NEWS
October 9, 2007
Appalachian Trail hiker and artist Lou Murray was the guide for a historical walk along the trail through Harpers Ferry, W.Va., on Sept. 30. The hikers visited and took photos of such sites as Jefferson Rock, Storer College and John Brown's Fort. On Oct. 14, Murray will lead a four-mile, three-hour walk on the Appalachian Trail in Maryland with stops for shooting photos. Participants will meet at 12:30 p.m. at Martin's Food Market on Dual Highway in Hagerstown. The cost is $25 per person or $40 per couple.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | June 28, 2007
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -Jazz veterans Curtis Fuller and John Handy will be the honorees at the sixth annual Don Redman Awards and Concert on Saturday in Harpers Ferry. Fuller, a 73-year-old trombonist, and Handy, a 74-year-old alto sax player, will perform with accompaniment by the Howard Burns Quartet, a local jazz act. The free, outdoor concert will be on the lawn of the Mather Training Center, off Filmore Street. The award recognizes artists who have strongly influenced jazz and have shared their love of music with others.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | February 5, 2007
HARPERS FERRY, W.VA. - Each year during its African American History Month celebration, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park shines the spotlight on someone who made significant contributions to black history in the area and the nation. Some of those individuals were associated with Storer College, a local college that was started after the Civil War to give blacks and others a place to obtain higher education. Those recognized over the years have included J.R. Clifford, who helped found West Virginia's first black newspaper and became the state's first black attorney, and David Henry Cole, a Jefferson County native who broke racial barriers in 1954 by becoming an accountant for Washington, D.C.'s tax and finance office.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | September 3, 2006
"What's the punch line?" I asked a man who walked past my friends and me as we picnicked at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park a couple of Saturday evenings ago. I could read the large letters on his T-shirt - "Lies My Teacher Told Me" - but I couldn't quite make out the finer print underneath. That first part is the title of a book he wrote. Published in 1995, subtitled "Everything Your American History Loewen's two years of research surveying 12 high school American history textbooks, according to information on his home page at the University of Vermont Web site at www.uvm.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | August 21, 2006
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - History buffs and others continued to enjoy the 100th anniversary of the Niagara Movement on Sunday, including about 300 people who traced the steps of an inspirational walk to pay tribute to abolitionist John Brown. The Niagara Movement involved a 1906 meeting in Harpers Ferry of black leaders and others who were working for freedom and equality for blacks. The movement became the foundation for the formation of the NAACP. At the 1906 meeting, Niagara Movement members honored the memory of abolitionist John Brown by walking to the fort where he was captured in Harpers Ferry at the start of the Civil War. Brown had a plan to start a war against slavery, but he was captured in a fire engine house after he and others raided Harpers Ferry.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | August 20, 2006
HARPERS FERRY, W.VA. - This is what Anissa Chams-Eddine wrote on her quilt square Saturday during the Centennial Commemoration of the Niagara Movement in Harpers Ferry: "I know why I'm here, but why are you?" It's a deep thought for a 10-year-old girl to have, and she expressed others when asked about the Niagara Movement, the precursor to the NAACP. "I want to learn more about this," she said, saying she learned about the Civil War and Reconstruction in school, but not the Niagara Movement.
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