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NEWS
July 31, 2007
It will be tough to sell West Virginia's state lawmakers on the idea of "locality pay" for teachers if the groups representing educators oppose the idea. State Sen. John Yoder says that while Eastern Panhandle lawmakers back the idea, the West Virginia Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers oppose it. Yoder said he believes that the opposition comes because those groups feel that if there is money for raises, it should be spread among all teachers in the state.
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NEWS
March 1, 2007
"I wonder if anyone else feels as demeaned as I do by this incessant natter over the paucity of the teachers' proposed 8.5 percent salary increase. It's obvious that the 'new Sunday op-ed columnist' has moved the educated noneducators of Washington County to the rear of the bus. It appears that we are, as the Catskills comedians used to say, 'chopped liver.' Well, at least we still have the privilege of paying taxes, and taxes and more taxes. You may sign me, voting with my feet, out of Washington County.
NEWS
May 11, 2006
The three members of Washington County's Maryland General Assembly delegation who attended Wednesday's post-session breakfast took a stab at answering the question we posed earlier this week: If things in the state capital remain as they are now - a governor who is a Republican and a legislature dominated by Democrats - how can the partisanship that marred the 2006 session be prevented in 2007? State Sen. Don Munson, R-Washington, Del. Chris Shank, R-Washington and Del. Bob McKee, R-Washington, all agreed that the partisanship got out of hand in 2006 because this is an election year.
NEWS
December 2, 2005
There's no nice way to say this, so let's just say it straight out: The proposal by Del. Sheila Hixson to have the state regulate tip jar gambling here is no better than a playground bully's attempt to steal a smaller child's lunch money. Gambling has been tightly regulated here for 10 years by local people. It not only returns a larger percentage of the money wagered to its players than the state lottery, it also provides millions for charitable causes. Every dollar that goes to unneeded state regulation is money that will be lost to nonprofits that do everything from mold young people's character to providing medical care to the indigent.
NEWS
November 10, 2005
Not long ago there was a television commercial for a hair-coloring product that ended with a well-coiffed model addressing the camera with this boastful comment: "And I'm worth it. " Some members of the Pennsylvania Legislature may feel they're worth the raise they gave themselves when no one was looking this past summer. But unlike models, lawmakers have to convince the public that the elected officials who meet in Harrisburg are worth the money they get. The raise itself might have passed under the public's radar, but some lawmakers - 158 to be exact - decided to take their raises before the next term began by filing for something called "unvouchered expenses.
NEWS
July 8, 2005
Time to earn that pay raise Perhaps in an effort to reward themselves for passing the state's budget only a week late this year, Pennsylvania lawmakers gave themselves a pay raise Thursday. Pennsylvania's lawmakers will now be paid more than $81,000. Taxpayers should demand that they earn every penny. The Associated Press reported that the pay increase passed without debate, by a margin of 119-79 in the House and in the Senate by 27-23. The increase, the first raise in base pay in 10 years, is a 16 percent pay boost and means that Pennsylvania's state lawmakers will earn the fourth-highest salaries in the 50 states.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | February 11, 2005
tammyb@herald-mail.com ANNAPOLIS - Doug Wright traveled to the state capital Thursday seeking a solution for Holly Place and Holly Place North, assisted living facilities that serve low-income senior citizens with medical issues. But he heard little in the way of a long-term answer for the homes' financial difficulties, and was advised to reconsider their mission. Wright, president of Senior Living Alternatives Inc., which runs Holly Place, told a group of state officials that the agency had followed the state's advice several years ago to seek aid through the Medicaid Waiver for Older Adults program, a state-administered program that provides subsidies for seniors who qualify to live in community housing rather than going to nursing homes.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | August 21, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com Standing on the steps of the Berkeley County Courthouse Friday afternoon, Republican gubernatorial candidate Monty Warner said that if he is elected, he will eliminate the "corruption and cronyism" prevalent throughout the state. Warner said he will use investigative powers to look into alleged misuses of state money and will even declare such actions illegal if need be. Warner, who will face Democrat Joe Manchin in the general election in November, said he plans to spend more time "per capita" campaigning in the Eastern Panhandle than anywhere else in the state.
NEWS
May 14, 2004
Pennsylvania legislators returned to the state capital this week after their primary election break to work on a state budget bill. The Republican majority and Democratic Gov. Ed Rendell are about $20 million apart on the $22.7 billion spending plan. They should do their best to compromise on this last piece of the puzzle, to avoid a repeat of last year's standoff, which went on for months. The deadline for approving a budget is June 30, so that the cash for the state's school districts will begin going out as the fiscal year begins on July 1. It didn't happen that way last year, when a dispute over education policy delayed the delivery of state aid for months.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | April 7, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - When the state Legislature holds its interim meetings in Shepherdstown, W.Va., in October, lawmakers from other parts of the state will be able to see firsthand exactly what kind of problems are present here, two local legislators said Tuesday. The meetings will be held from Oct. 10 to Oct.12, with most meetings likely to be held at the Clarion Hotel & Conference Center. Others could be held on the Shepherd College campus or at the National Conservation Training Center outside of town, said Sen. John Unger, D-Berkeley.
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