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OBITUARIES
December 13, 2012
Jennifer Jean Strack, 45, died Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2012, due to complications from spina bifida. A private family memorial service will be arranged. Arrangements are by Brown Funeral Home, Martinsburg, W.Va.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | January 9, 2006
kristinw@herald-mail.com Jill Parker considers herself lucky. She is as independent as she wants to be, she has a full life that she shares with family and friends and just like many other 22-year-old women, she's starting a career in her chosen field. But when Parker was born in 1983 with a portion of her spine exposed, the picture for her future didn't look so rosy. Parker is one of thousands of people living with spina bifida - a birth defect that leaves the spinal cord exposed.
NEWS
August 9, 1997
Teen hopes other wheelchair users will compete By TERRY TALBERT Staff Writer You can call Aaron Hendrickson disabled. You can also call him champion. Despite the fact that he can't walk, the 17-year-old Clear Spring youth recently set two national junior weightlifting records. At 123 pounds, Hendrickson bench pressed 210 pounds and powerlifted 190 pounds. He also won three other first-place medals - in the discus and javelin throws and the shotput. "I was excited," Hendrickson said of the competition.
NEWS
January 22, 1997
Nearly 3,000 American babies are born each year with defects of the brain or spinal cord. It is estimated that up to half of these neural tube defects could be prevented if women consumed 0.4 milligrams of folic acid each day for at least a month prior to conception and during the first few months thereafter. Sounds simple. Timing is crucial. Neural tube defects occur before most women even know they are pregnant, and about 50 percent of pregnancies are unplanned. Therefore, women between the ages of 15 and 45 should consume adequate amounts of folic acid in their diets every single day beginning in early adolescence.
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | July 21, 2003
shappell@herald-mail.com Shannon Monninger could move into her brand new home on Liberty Street by Christmas thanks to a joint venture between a church and several local service organizations. However, the house is no holiday gift for Monninger, who will be working both to earn the right to live there and to pay for it. Habitat for Humanity of Washington County, St. John's Episcopal Church, MIHI (Many Individuals Helping Individuals) and the Washington County Region of Episcopal Churches took part in a groundbreaking ceremony for a new "universal-designed" home in the 400 block of Liberty Street.
NEWS
by LISA TEDRICK PREJEAN | December 13, 2002
I've often wished while working with toddlers that I knew exactly what 1- to 2-year-olds want. A little finger points and I think it's aimed at a toy. But when the toy is placed beside the child, the finger remains in the air, and the pleading gets a little more urgent. Cracker? Water? Blanket? I'll eventually guess correctly, but the child's frustration mounts as the scene continues. It must be disgruntling to be dependent on someone to meet your needs and be unable to communicate what those needs are. How can we parents and care-givers help children communicate their needs more easily?
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | December 14, 2004
andrear@herald-mail.com Sure, the snow-tubing trips and other activities rock. But Carrissa Kesler said the best part of participating in the Best Buddies program at South Hagerstown High School was sitting across the table from her in Terri Younker's special education classroom. His name is Robert Linton. "I thought it would be fun to get to know everybody," said sophomore Carrissa, 15, of Hagerstown, who signed up for the Best Buddies program during her freshman year at South High.
NEWS
by ALICIA NOTARIANNI | May 12, 2006
Judy Titchnell said she had considerable obstacles to finding a job. "I needed something I could do sitting down," Titchnell said. "I don't have a lot of education and my qualifications were kind of limited. " Titchnell was born with spina bifida and uses a wheelchair. She said it wasn't necessary for her to work until about three years ago, when her husband retired and her medical insurance coverage ended. Titchnell, 57, of Front Royal, Va., turned to Horizon Goodwill Industries for help.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | January 20, 2006
kristinw@herald-mail.com Dr. David Baltierra slowly and deliberately moved his ultrasound probe across Jackie Darlington's bulging abdomen. "OK, Jackie," Baltierra said in a soft voice. "There is your baby's brain. We're going to take some measurements. The parts of the brain look normal. " And with those few words, a mother's nerves were calmed. Ultrasound technology has long allowed expectant parents to get a glimpse of their baby growing in the uterus. The sound-wave device allows doctors to see whether everything appears normal and can reassure parents-to-be that their baby will be born with functioning organs and all 10 fingers and toes.
NEWS
By KRISTIN WILSON | February 12, 2006
kristinw@herald-mail.com As Valentine's Day approaches, images of happy couples, love and romance can remind one of the promise of finding that special someone and living a happily-ever-after life. Little boys and little girls are raised on fairy tales that Prince Charming finds his Cinderella, Snow White or Sleeping Beauty, all they have to do is say, "I do," and walk down the aisle together. The real story about love and marriage takes many a twist and turn on the road to happiness and marital bliss.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OBITUARIES
December 13, 2012
Jennifer Jean Strack, 45, died Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2012, due to complications from spina bifida. A private family memorial service will be arranged. Arrangements are by Brown Funeral Home, Martinsburg, W.Va.
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NEWS
by ALICIA NOTARIANNI | May 12, 2006
Judy Titchnell said she had considerable obstacles to finding a job. "I needed something I could do sitting down," Titchnell said. "I don't have a lot of education and my qualifications were kind of limited. " Titchnell was born with spina bifida and uses a wheelchair. She said it wasn't necessary for her to work until about three years ago, when her husband retired and her medical insurance coverage ended. Titchnell, 57, of Front Royal, Va., turned to Horizon Goodwill Industries for help.
NEWS
By KRISTIN WILSON | February 12, 2006
kristinw@herald-mail.com As Valentine's Day approaches, images of happy couples, love and romance can remind one of the promise of finding that special someone and living a happily-ever-after life. Little boys and little girls are raised on fairy tales that Prince Charming finds his Cinderella, Snow White or Sleeping Beauty, all they have to do is say, "I do," and walk down the aisle together. The real story about love and marriage takes many a twist and turn on the road to happiness and marital bliss.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | January 20, 2006
kristinw@herald-mail.com Dr. David Baltierra slowly and deliberately moved his ultrasound probe across Jackie Darlington's bulging abdomen. "OK, Jackie," Baltierra said in a soft voice. "There is your baby's brain. We're going to take some measurements. The parts of the brain look normal. " And with those few words, a mother's nerves were calmed. Ultrasound technology has long allowed expectant parents to get a glimpse of their baby growing in the uterus. The sound-wave device allows doctors to see whether everything appears normal and can reassure parents-to-be that their baby will be born with functioning organs and all 10 fingers and toes.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | January 9, 2006
kristinw@herald-mail.com Jill Parker considers herself lucky. She is as independent as she wants to be, she has a full life that she shares with family and friends and just like many other 22-year-old women, she's starting a career in her chosen field. But when Parker was born in 1983 with a portion of her spine exposed, the picture for her future didn't look so rosy. Parker is one of thousands of people living with spina bifida - a birth defect that leaves the spinal cord exposed.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | December 14, 2004
andrear@herald-mail.com Sure, the snow-tubing trips and other activities rock. But Carrissa Kesler said the best part of participating in the Best Buddies program at South Hagerstown High School was sitting across the table from her in Terri Younker's special education classroom. His name is Robert Linton. "I thought it would be fun to get to know everybody," said sophomore Carrissa, 15, of Hagerstown, who signed up for the Best Buddies program during her freshman year at South High.
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | July 21, 2003
shappell@herald-mail.com Shannon Monninger could move into her brand new home on Liberty Street by Christmas thanks to a joint venture between a church and several local service organizations. However, the house is no holiday gift for Monninger, who will be working both to earn the right to live there and to pay for it. Habitat for Humanity of Washington County, St. John's Episcopal Church, MIHI (Many Individuals Helping Individuals) and the Washington County Region of Episcopal Churches took part in a groundbreaking ceremony for a new "universal-designed" home in the 400 block of Liberty Street.
NEWS
by LISA TEDRICK PREJEAN | December 13, 2002
I've often wished while working with toddlers that I knew exactly what 1- to 2-year-olds want. A little finger points and I think it's aimed at a toy. But when the toy is placed beside the child, the finger remains in the air, and the pleading gets a little more urgent. Cracker? Water? Blanket? I'll eventually guess correctly, but the child's frustration mounts as the scene continues. It must be disgruntling to be dependent on someone to meet your needs and be unable to communicate what those needs are. How can we parents and care-givers help children communicate their needs more easily?
NEWS
August 9, 1997
Teen hopes other wheelchair users will compete By TERRY TALBERT Staff Writer You can call Aaron Hendrickson disabled. You can also call him champion. Despite the fact that he can't walk, the 17-year-old Clear Spring youth recently set two national junior weightlifting records. At 123 pounds, Hendrickson bench pressed 210 pounds and powerlifted 190 pounds. He also won three other first-place medals - in the discus and javelin throws and the shotput. "I was excited," Hendrickson said of the competition.
NEWS
January 22, 1997
Nearly 3,000 American babies are born each year with defects of the brain or spinal cord. It is estimated that up to half of these neural tube defects could be prevented if women consumed 0.4 milligrams of folic acid each day for at least a month prior to conception and during the first few months thereafter. Sounds simple. Timing is crucial. Neural tube defects occur before most women even know they are pregnant, and about 50 percent of pregnancies are unplanned. Therefore, women between the ages of 15 and 45 should consume adequate amounts of folic acid in their diets every single day beginning in early adolescence.
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