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Spence

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NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE/Staff Correspondent | September 5, 2010
Tire choice is so important at Hagerstown Speedway, especially if you want to be fast. With that said, nobody could catch J.T. Spence on Saturday night. Spence grabbed the lead from Tyler Armstrong on the fourth lap before fighting off Gary Stuhler's late charges to earn the win in the 44-lap 25th Annual McBee/Hays Championship, his first Late Model since 2008 at Hagerstown. "Whenever that guy (Stuhler) is behind you, the only thing you don't want to do is make a mistake," said Spence of Hagerstown's winningest driver.
SPORTS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | May 2, 2011
Behind the wheel of another Doug Timmons-owned machine, J.T. Spence made it look easy again in a Steel Block Bandits Late Model Series race on Saturday night at Hagerstown Speedway. Spence, piloting the No. 16T late model sportsman, dominated his heat race, ran away with the $200 six-lap dash for cash and was untouchable during the 30-lap Greg Kerr Memorial to net a cool $4,300 pay day in the first-ever series race at the track. The Winchester, Va., driver led every lap of the feature and it was his second consecutive win driving a Timmons car in a Steel Block Bandit race.
NEWS
August 28, 2005
RUNNING WILLIAMSPORT - Former Olympian Steve Spence came from behind in the final mile to overtake Micheal Wardian to win his third consecutive title at the 24th annual Gary Brown Memorial C&O Canal 5-Mile Run on Saturday. Spence, the 43-year-old head track coach at Shippensburg University, won the overall and men's masters title with a time of 25:20, 13 seconds better than Wardian, the defending Frederick Marathon medalist. North Hagerstown senior Hemu Arumugam finished sixth overall in 28:59 to win his third straight high school title.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | January 20, 2000
Washington County District Court Judge Noel Spence refused to grant probation before judgment Thursday to a man who assaulted an animal control officer who removed his dog from a 100-degree vehicle last summer. Eric R. Younker, 27, of 15435 Dellinger Road, Williamsport, was found guilty of second-degree assault and fined $100. The animal control officer "was clearly doing her duty," Spence said of C. Keller Haden's actions on July 17. "Younker deserves the conviction because of his behavior and his history.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | September 3, 1998
A Waynesboro, Pa., man was sentenced to one year in jail Wednesday for possession of child pornography he had kept for 15 years, stashed in a Hagerstown self-storage bin. James Vincent Hughes Jr., 50, of 7659 Mentzer Gap Road, pleaded guilty to that charge in June before Washington County District Judge Noel Spence, who on Wednesday imposed the maximum one-year sentence. Defense attorney Steve Kessell told Spence that Hughes had kept the 134 Polaroid pictures he took of the victim all these years because he didn't know how to get rid of them.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | January 21, 2000
Washington County District Court Judge Noel Spence refused to grant probation before judgment Thursday to a man who assaulted an animal control officer who removed his dog from a 100-degree vehicle last summer. Eric R. Younker, 27, of 15435 Dellinger Road, Williamsport, was found guilty of second-degree assault and fined $100. The animal control officer "was clearly doing her duty," Spence said of C. Keller Haden's actions on July 17. "Younker deserves the conviction because of his behavior and his history.
NEWS
May 23, 1997
By MARLO BARNHART Staff Writer Two Ohio doctors - convicted in January of carrying 100-plus doses of morphine in their family van - were granted probation before judgment Thursday in Washington County District Court. But Judge R. Noel Spence stopped short of letting Drs. Arlene Marie Basedow and William Kent Basedow off lightly. "For people who are highly educated and respected by your peers and your patients, you have exhibited extremely foolish, thoughtless and ignorant behavior," Spence said.
NEWS
January 11, 2007
MEN'S BASKETBALL Prince George's 90, HCC 82 HAGERSTOWN (2-11, 0-5) Spence 5 0-0 12, Henry 1 0-0 2, Waters 8 0-0 20, Cox 3 0-0 6, Long 6 2-5 14, Nelson 14 0-1 28. Totals 37 2-6 82. PRINCE GEORGE'S (8-4, 4-2) Sweet 6 3-4 16, Willis 2 2-3 6, Spencer 7 3-6 19, Colvin 4 1-1 9, Jones 4 1-2 9, Myers 5 2-7 16, Giddings 0 1-2 1, Hickson 6 2-4 14. Totals 34 16-24 90. Halftime - Prince George's 45-40. 3-point goals - HCC 6 (Spence 2, Waters 4). Prince George's 6 (Sweet, Spencer 2, Myers, Hickson 2)
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | September 11, 2013
The sale of The Washington Post by its longtime owning family, the Grahams, and the death of Eugene Patterson, Pulitzer-winning editor of no less than three of American's great newspapers, marked an end to an important half century of journalism in the country. From the early 1950s to just after 2000, the press, first in the states of the former Confederacy and then over the entire nation, became a force for social, political and economic change in a way that had not been seen since the Progression era in the early years of the last century.
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OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | August 21, 2013
One ridge to the west of us, where U.S. 30 and Pa. 655 intersect, is the village of Harrisonville, Pa. Once it was a busy place. Stores bought local produce and sold the necessities. There were small sawmills. There was a school and there were several churches. The local post office moved the mail.  Licking Creek runs through the village on its way to the Potomac River. It powered the mills and offered fishing and swimming. Harrisonville came into being in the early 19th century.
OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | July 24, 2013
When most of us think of discrimination, we think of “other” people. If you are a WASP, you often view your efforts to abate discriminatory practices as a form of mission work - an altruistic gift for the good of others. But the best reason for actively opposing discrimination lies in the protection of one's own self-interest. If it can happen to one, it can happen to anyone. This came home to me in the fall of 1965. I was a third-year student at Duke Law School. I had spent the last three or four months reporting on another “Civil Rights” summer.
OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | May 29, 2013
Arkansas is a state for which Mississippi is grateful, for as long as it exists unchanged, Mississippi has a cushion between itself and last place in most national indicators of social and economic well-being. This is true despite the fact that it can be argued that Bentonville, in the hills of Arkansas' northwest corner, is the point of origin of much of the economic life of our increasingly marketized economy. This small, isolated city is home to Tyson Foods, J.B. Hunt Transport and Walmart.
OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | May 1, 2013
This has been an active winter for downtown Hagers-town. A stadium proposal came and went. The school board, on hearing the siren call of City Center, fled for the burbs. The march of small business bankruptcies continued, often leaving unpaid lessors and development loans in their wake. The downtown souffle rose and then fell. The net result is not positive. Perhaps part of the difficulty that Hagerstonians have with downtown recovery lies in a failure of analysis. Look at the news stories, the comments at public meetings, the views expressed in private conversations and you will see that downtown's demise seems to be regarded as an act of fate - rather like an earthquake, hurricane or plague.
OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | April 15, 2013
Spring is the time of the thick envelope if you are lucky, the thin envelope if you are not. April 14 used to be the day that top-tier colleges let the humble petitioners know their fate - in or out. Now, the information dribbles out from early March to May. It was a cool spring afternoon as I walked home from the bus. (Few, if any students had cars in 1959). I followed the winding brick walk to the front porch, and there in the basket my mother had bought on a North Carolina vacation was the mail.
OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | March 6, 2013
The Bard recommended that all lawyers should be killed. Many Americans share that sentiment, at least to some extent. While the mass extermination suggested by Shakespeare is not going to happen, there is hope for those who feel overlawyered: Fewer lawyers are being made. Law school enrollment is falling and has been for several years. The Law School Admission Council reports that applications have fallen from about 100,000 in 2004 to about 50,000 in the current year. Enrollment has fallen from about 50,000 students to fewer than 40,000, about where it was 30 years ago. The result: Law schools are cutting faculty, extending tuition discounts and a few schools might be threatened with closure or merger.
OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | February 7, 2013
Sometimes, communities go in search of salvation. They sense the future is slipping away and they take desperate steps in an attempt to avoid irrelevance. Sometimes, salvation is a new facility; sometimes, a new industry or community redesign. Here, in the Cumberland Valley, we are not strangers to this form of enthusiasm. These periodic enthusiasms are fine as long as a broad perspective is maintained. Here is a cautionary tale from almost 100 years ago. Some 40 men look out of the grainy black-and-white photograph with an earnest hunger.
OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | January 9, 2013
The legislative machine in Washington crept back into motion early this month, and there were indications amidst the screeching and growling that it might be good to go long enough to get the country out of its self-inflicted economic ditch. The holiday shopping season was modest, but it was more energetic this year than it has been for almost half a decade. The local sense of family and community seems rejuvenated, and the “good will to all men” part of the carol seems more credible.
OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | December 5, 2012
Now that the election and Thanksgiving are past, perhaps it would be useful but not necessarily fun to reflect a bit on partisanship, the institution that has done much to put us where we are. The Founders, by and large, envisioned the United States as a kind of nonpartisan assembly of a country. Most of the “framers” hated the idea of party, associating it with the interminable conflicts of European public life, endless corruption and subversion of the public purpose. Franklin and Washington and many of their colleagues detested partisanship (although bowing to emerging realties Washington did become a marginal Federalist)
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