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Speed Cameras

NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | April 9, 2009
ANNAPOLIS -- An effort by state lawmakers to exclude Washington County from a law allowing speed cameras to ticket drivers has failed, but they are expected to try again today. Washington County's delegation announced Wednesday they hoped to exclude the county from the bill. Del. Andrew A. Serafini, R-Washington, offered an amendment to the bill in committee that would have excluded Washington County, but that amendment failed. A similar amendment to the bill, drafted by Del. LeRoy E. Myers Jr., R-Allegany/Washington, likely will be offered on the House floor today.
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OPINION
July 11, 2013
Prejudice of the few should not penalize pursuits of others To the editor: More than 40 years after having explosively fought its way to the forefront of American consciousness with the Stonewall Riots, the war for equality and acceptance of the LGBTQ community is still being waged. So many of the great minds and important voices of our time have been shut down and silenced due to their “abnormality.” Lives have been shattered, like glass houses into which stones from the hands of sinners have been cast.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | April 21, 2013
People in Washington County should concern themselves with the following passage from the Chicago Tribune, which appeared two days after Christmas: “In an annual ritual that has become as predictable if not as joyous as a New Year's Eve countdown to midnight, Chicago drivers again will have to dig a little deeper to pay to park at meters in 2013. “Loop rates will go up 75 cents to $6.50 an hour as part of scheduled fee increases included in Mayor Richard Daley's much-criticized 2008 lease of the city's meters to Chicago Parking Meters LLC.” Chicago Parking Meters LLC?
OPINION
By ART CALLAHAM | August 18, 2013
I was sure the “speed camera” issue was going to get the usual number of “pooh hoohs” from the usual suspects who are against anything and everything. A good friend of mine told me that “if you have six loud people against anything here in Washington County, you have a majority.” It took me a moment to process that truism; but, I only had to remember the new medical facility issue, some truck stop proposals, and almost anything dealing with land use to see the truth in my friend's statement.
NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | September 30, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Two new Maryland laws taking effect Thursday target driving safety. One makes writing or sending a text message while driving a misdemeanor. The other allows speed cameras in school zones and within some work zones on highways. "It's going to be just like any other violation," Maryland State Police 1st Sgt. Kevin Lewis said Wednesday of the text message law. "Troopers, when they're out there, will be alert for people who are violating this particular law. " He acknowledged it will be a difficult law to enforce.
OPINION
February 9, 2012
“I'm calling to comment on the county's policy on the recycling program, which is going to begin soon, and us seniors, it's going to cost us more money, we're going to have to pay to recycle, and I think my solution is going to be I'm just going to put everything in the trash again. For many years, I've recycled and saved glass and plastic and such, and now they're going to charging me a lot more to dispose of it. And I'm already paying a trash bill, which is not going to be anything different.
NEWS
January 26, 2006
Washington County Delegation Chairman Christopher Shank this week said he and his colleagues faced a "moral quandary" when a Montgomery County lawmaker asked for their help in overriding one of the governor's vetoes. Fortunately, the quandary sparked an epiphany, a moment of insight during which local lawmakers realized that it's sometimes better to do some horse-trading than it is to make enemies. It didn't hurt that the issue wasn't one of statewide importance, nor did it have any moral or religious overtones.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | April 28, 2009
MAUGANSVILLE -- A month before Memorial Day, labor leaders gathered Tuesday to remember workers who died on the job. Last year, about 6,000 people were killed while working, said Fred D. Mason Jr., president of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations in Maryland and Washington, D.C. Labor unions need to stand up for employees and pledge "that you deserve to work in a safe workplace," Mason said during a...
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