Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsSpecial Treatment
IN THE NEWS

Special Treatment

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
by DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | February 22, 2006
daniels@herald-mail.com A month removed from the event that sparked their comments, members of Hagerstown City Council decided gaps in the city's ethics and procedural documents are not so wide as they first perceived them to be. During a work session Tuesday, council members said they do not feel they need to make changes to either the city's code of ethics or its rules of procedure, but they do need to make sure members of the council...
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | August 23, 2002
marlob@herald-mail.com A routine barking dog complaint heard Thursday night at a Washington County Animal Control Authority hearing led to allegations that the dogs' owner was getting special treatment because she is the executive director of the local humane society. Two neighbors testified that they made approximately 18 calls in the past year to either the Humane Society of Washington County or to the Washington County Sheriff's Department complaining about Maria Procopio's dogs barking in her yard at 17623 Stone Valley Drive.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | March 10, 1998
Mennonites did not ask for farm runoff exception Mennonite farmers in Washington County don't think they should get special treatment when the General Assembly considers state regulations on the use of fertilizer. "It would be unfair competition," said the Rev. Maurice Martin of Hagerstown Mennonite Fellowship at Huyett's Crossroads. "If it was a Bible principle, we would appreciate an exception. But this is not the case. " Maryland's House of Delegates and Senate last week approved separate bills designed to limit runoff of nutrients blamed for outbreaks of the fish-killing Pfiesteria microbe on the Eastern Shore last summer.
NEWS
by DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | January 25, 2006
daniels@herald-mail.com Hagerstown City Councilwoman Alesia D. Parson-McBean on Tuesday delivered a backhanded compliment to The Herald-Mail for its coverage of events surrounding the ride she was given last week by a Hagerstown Police Department lieutenant to the Motor Vehicle Administration. During closing comments of the mayor and council work session, Parson-McBean said she felt the news coverage might have helped the newspaper sell copies, while her picture on the front page Saturday and Tuesday helped to humanize her. "I'd like to thank The Herald-Mail for pointing out that I am human, and I do forget," she said.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | July 25, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- The Washington County Ethics Commission did not reach a decision when it met Thursday in connection with a complaint about the way a Hagerstown city councilwoman is alleged to have conducted herself when she was stopped for speeding in May. Washington County Assistant Attorney Kirk Downey said he did not know when the commission would reach a decision regarding Councilwoman Kelly S. Cromer, who, among other things, is alleged to...
NEWS
May 20, 2003
Congress gets no special treatment To the editor: I appreciate the opportunity to respond to Ms. Kissinger's letter to the editor of May 7. There is no question that the United States has the finest health care in the world, but there are severe problems with access and cost. I was flattered but had nothing to do with an independent group, United Seniors Association, featuring me in their recent ads highlighting the positive steps being taken by Congress to improve the health care system for seniors.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | January 14, 2000
ANNAPOLIS - A local Mennonite group has asked to be exempted from Maryland workers' compensation laws because it's against their religion to collect a claim. One lawmaker said he might take up their cause. Sen. Alex X. Mooney, R-Frederick/Washington, has done some research on the issue and has drafted a bill. He is trying to find out if there would be support in the Maryland General Assembly before deciding whether to pursue the legislation. The Washington County and Franklin County, Pa., Mennonite Conference has asked for the state relief.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | April 23, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Family members of Delbert Rodgers said Friday that they have no doubt the man they looked to for wisdom would be celebrating his 96th birthday today had he not been murdered more than two years ago. Three of Rodgers' family members spoke in Circuit Judge Christopher Wilkes' courtroom Friday morning before Wilkes formally sentenced one of the men charged in Rodgers' death. Adhering to the terms of a plea bargain, Wilkes sentenced John Michael Dignazio, 31, to serve life in prison.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | January 26, 2006
So, another nice, quiet weekend for our City Council members, I assume? Nothing out of the ordinary to report. I'll just leaf back through the weekend papers to make sure, and - oh dear. This group still has another, what, 3 1/2 years left in its term, so I'm going to be an optimist and predict that sometime between now and 2009, all members of this board will be able to make it through one complete month without doing something that makes the rest of us want to avert our eyes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By TIM KOELBLE | March 29, 2009
Isaac Thornton's first and last games as a Martinsburg Bulldog had one thing in common. He was a winner. Martinsburg coach Dave Rogers knew he had a jewel in Thornton's first start on Dec. 6, 2006, against Clarke County (Va.). Thornton scored 20 points in the 67-51 victory. It was the first step en route to his career total of 1,302 points. "I remember the game. I just knew I had to go out and hustle," said Thornton. "I hit everything that game. " In the final game of his prep career, Thornton sank two free throws with five seconds remaining on March 21 to lift the Bulldogs to a 53-52 victory over South Charleston in the West Virginia Class AAA state championship game.
Advertisement
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | July 25, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- The Washington County Ethics Commission did not reach a decision when it met Thursday in connection with a complaint about the way a Hagerstown city councilwoman is alleged to have conducted herself when she was stopped for speeding in May. Washington County Assistant Attorney Kirk Downey said he did not know when the commission would reach a decision regarding Councilwoman Kelly S. Cromer, who, among other things, is alleged to...
NEWS
by DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | February 22, 2006
daniels@herald-mail.com A month removed from the event that sparked their comments, members of Hagerstown City Council decided gaps in the city's ethics and procedural documents are not so wide as they first perceived them to be. During a work session Tuesday, council members said they do not feel they need to make changes to either the city's code of ethics or its rules of procedure, but they do need to make sure members of the council...
NEWS
January 28, 2006
Why did McBean get special treatment? To the editor: Well, well, well, Councilwoman Alesia Parson-McBean appears to have no respect for the laws of the land or the Motor Vehicle Administration. Why should the police department cut her any slack just because she is on the council? She should be setting the example; she should admit her violation, pay the fine and be quiet. If the police department is in fact her private taxi they should be strongly admonished by the mayor and council and ordered to stop.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | January 26, 2006
So, another nice, quiet weekend for our City Council members, I assume? Nothing out of the ordinary to report. I'll just leaf back through the weekend papers to make sure, and - oh dear. This group still has another, what, 3 1/2 years left in its term, so I'm going to be an optimist and predict that sometime between now and 2009, all members of this board will be able to make it through one complete month without doing something that makes the rest of us want to avert our eyes.
NEWS
by DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | January 25, 2006
daniels@herald-mail.com Hagerstown City Councilwoman Alesia D. Parson-McBean on Tuesday delivered a backhanded compliment to The Herald-Mail for its coverage of events surrounding the ride she was given last week by a Hagerstown Police Department lieutenant to the Motor Vehicle Administration. During closing comments of the mayor and council work session, Parson-McBean said she felt the news coverage might have helped the newspaper sell copies, while her picture on the front page Saturday and Tuesday helped to humanize her. "I'd like to thank The Herald-Mail for pointing out that I am human, and I do forget," she said.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | April 23, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Family members of Delbert Rodgers said Friday that they have no doubt the man they looked to for wisdom would be celebrating his 96th birthday today had he not been murdered more than two years ago. Three of Rodgers' family members spoke in Circuit Judge Christopher Wilkes' courtroom Friday morning before Wilkes formally sentenced one of the men charged in Rodgers' death. Adhering to the terms of a plea bargain, Wilkes sentenced John Michael Dignazio, 31, to serve life in prison.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | August 23, 2002
marlob@herald-mail.com A routine barking dog complaint heard Thursday night at a Washington County Animal Control Authority hearing led to allegations that the dogs' owner was getting special treatment because she is the executive director of the local humane society. Two neighbors testified that they made approximately 18 calls in the past year to either the Humane Society of Washington County or to the Washington County Sheriff's Department complaining about Maria Procopio's dogs barking in her yard at 17623 Stone Valley Drive.
NEWS
by CAILIN MCGOUGH | July 11, 2002
cailinm@herald-mail.com When Gary Owen arrived at the Ranger Foundation last September, he had earned his retirement. For years, the horse played polo and was paraded at Valley Forge Military Academy in Wayne, Pa. But at more than 30 years of age and blind in one eye, Gary Owen was no longer suitable for sport and show. For the Ranger Foundation, however, he was perfect. The non-profit organization located on Greenbrier Farm in Keedysville is home to 10 retired service horses.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|