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by DAVE McMILLION | October 14, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.VA. - Growing up in a poor family in the "hills and hollows" of Bedford, Ind., astronaut Charles D. Walker remembered eating ketchup sandwiches and bean soup at his boyhood home. But it didn't affect his desire to dream big. Walker remembered watching Walt Disney television shows about space exploration and from that point on, he knew that is what he wanted to do with his life. Walker credited part of his success in space exploration with public school teachers who supported him in his interest in space.
NEWS
April 15, 1997
By LISA GRAYBEAL Staff Writer, Waynesboro MERCERSBURG, Pa. - NASA Astronaut Thomas Jones told Mercersburg Academy students Monday night that they're part of a generation whose members will likely have to commute over thousands of miles aboard a rocket to get to their jobs in space. Jones, 42, who's wife, Elizabeth, graduated from Mercersburg Academy in 1974, spoke to a packed crowd in Boone Hall about his aeronautics career and his most recent mission aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia in November 1996.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | October 22, 2006
For older generations, he is remembered in a black-and-white staticky TV image as one of the first two men to step foot on the moon. For younger generations, he is a heroic figure they've read about in textbooks and an image they often saw on TV - in the shape of the MTV logo of a moon man or the MTV Video Music Award, aka the Buzzy. Buzz Aldrin, 76, a member of the famous July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 landing on the moon, will speak at Shippensburg University's H. Ric Luhrs Performing Arts Center at 8 p.m. Thursday as part of the President's Lecture Series.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | July 10, 1999
Man's first walk on the moon 30 years ago was one of those pivotal moments in history when many people still remember exactly what they were doing when it happened. "The whole family sat around when it was happening," said Waynesboro resident Joe Bowling, recounting the moment he watched it on television. "It was neat. But it seems a waste now," said Bowling. "There are other things to worry about. " The idea of a lunar walk was so unusual that some people didn't believe it was happening, area residents said.
NEWS
September 14, 2007
Think science classes are dull? One trip to Discovery Station could change all that. From dinosaurs to space exploration, Discovery Station's informal hands-on programs and exhibits are designed to make learning an up-close and personal experience. An interactive museum geared toward children and families, Discovery Station opened in 2005 in the former Nicodemus bank building. Since then, the museum has welcomed visitors from 19 different states, and has become a destination for school trips from systems in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, said B. Marie Byers, president of the museum's board.
NEWS
January 12, 2001
Martin Luther King Jr. To those who lived through it, it hardly seems possible that more than 30 years have passed since the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968. For many adults and schoolchildren, today is a holiday from work, but just as Memorial Day obliges citizens to remember those who've diied in service to their country, part of today should, at least part of King's birthday should be spent reflecting on his life and how he changed America. Confronted by a national government that was looking toward space exploration even as it ignored injustice on the ground, King did not take up arms.
NEWS
by KATE S. ALEXANDER | October 27, 2006
SHIPPENSBURG, PA. - Legendary astronaut Buzz Aldrin visited Shippensburg University on Thursday and spoke casually of the past, the present and, as he said, "most importantly" the future. "We need to get back into exploration," the 76-year-old said to the audience of about 1,000 people, reassuring them that if America did, "we will get to Mars. " Since his landmark flight in 1969, Aldrin has spent his life working in space exploration. The founder of the Share Space Foundation, Aldrin said one of his foundation's goals is to encourage students so that future generations can experience what space is like.
NEWS
By LISA PREJEAN | July 17, 2009
One of my earliest memories was watching coverage of Apollo 11 landing on the moon. Even though, at age 3, I didn't realize the magnitude of the event, that historic moment was captured in my mind. I sensed several things. This had not been done before. Space exploration was exciting. There was a "What's next?" expectation from the adults who were watching. I was told I would remember that historic moment the rest of my life, and it is interesting to look back.
NEWS
February 6, 2004
This 'solution' needs some work To the editor: This letter is in response to the Mr. Kauffman who wants to outlaw the veterinarian's and pet owner's only answer to humanely ending their pet's life. This person's idea was that we should immediately outlaw the drugs used to euthanize pets because it causes suffering to the animal we are attempting to kill. And then make a law requiring all citizens to spay and neuter their pets. What in the world is this person thinking?
NEWS
April 18, 1999
By BRUCE HAMILTON / Staff Writer photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer A mission to Mars marks the reopening of the renovated Washington County Planetarium on Tuesday. Its first public show this year will be "Destination Mars," a combination of slides and video describing a planned NASA journey to the red planet in 2018. [cont. from front page ] The planetarium at the Washington County Board of Education's Central Office on Commonwealth Avenue closed for repairs in August.
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NEWS
By LISA PREJEAN | July 17, 2009
One of my earliest memories was watching coverage of Apollo 11 landing on the moon. Even though, at age 3, I didn't realize the magnitude of the event, that historic moment was captured in my mind. I sensed several things. This had not been done before. Space exploration was exciting. There was a "What's next?" expectation from the adults who were watching. I was told I would remember that historic moment the rest of my life, and it is interesting to look back.
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NEWS
May 17, 2009
Editor's note: Each week, The Herald-Mail invites readers to answer poll questions on its Web site, www.herald-mail.com. Readers also may submit comments about the poll question when voting. Each Sunday, a sampling of edited reader comments will run in The Herald-Mail. Last week there were three poll questions. The first question was: Should NASA pursue plans to resume sending astronauts to the moon? "We should go to the moon as practice for the mission to Mars. We need to keep pushing our missions of exploration.
NEWS
September 14, 2007
Think science classes are dull? One trip to Discovery Station could change all that. From dinosaurs to space exploration, Discovery Station's informal hands-on programs and exhibits are designed to make learning an up-close and personal experience. An interactive museum geared toward children and families, Discovery Station opened in 2005 in the former Nicodemus bank building. Since then, the museum has welcomed visitors from 19 different states, and has become a destination for school trips from systems in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, said B. Marie Byers, president of the museum's board.
NEWS
by KATE S. ALEXANDER | October 27, 2006
SHIPPENSBURG, PA. - Legendary astronaut Buzz Aldrin visited Shippensburg University on Thursday and spoke casually of the past, the present and, as he said, "most importantly" the future. "We need to get back into exploration," the 76-year-old said to the audience of about 1,000 people, reassuring them that if America did, "we will get to Mars. " Since his landmark flight in 1969, Aldrin has spent his life working in space exploration. The founder of the Share Space Foundation, Aldrin said one of his foundation's goals is to encourage students so that future generations can experience what space is like.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | October 22, 2006
For older generations, he is remembered in a black-and-white staticky TV image as one of the first two men to step foot on the moon. For younger generations, he is a heroic figure they've read about in textbooks and an image they often saw on TV - in the shape of the MTV logo of a moon man or the MTV Video Music Award, aka the Buzzy. Buzz Aldrin, 76, a member of the famous July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 landing on the moon, will speak at Shippensburg University's H. Ric Luhrs Performing Arts Center at 8 p.m. Thursday as part of the President's Lecture Series.
NEWS
February 6, 2004
This 'solution' needs some work To the editor: This letter is in response to the Mr. Kauffman who wants to outlaw the veterinarian's and pet owner's only answer to humanely ending their pet's life. This person's idea was that we should immediately outlaw the drugs used to euthanize pets because it causes suffering to the animal we are attempting to kill. And then make a law requiring all citizens to spay and neuter their pets. What in the world is this person thinking?
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | October 14, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.VA. - Growing up in a poor family in the "hills and hollows" of Bedford, Ind., astronaut Charles D. Walker remembered eating ketchup sandwiches and bean soup at his boyhood home. But it didn't affect his desire to dream big. Walker remembered watching Walt Disney television shows about space exploration and from that point on, he knew that is what he wanted to do with his life. Walker credited part of his success in space exploration with public school teachers who supported him in his interest in space.
NEWS
January 12, 2001
Martin Luther King Jr. To those who lived through it, it hardly seems possible that more than 30 years have passed since the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968. For many adults and schoolchildren, today is a holiday from work, but just as Memorial Day obliges citizens to remember those who've diied in service to their country, part of today should, at least part of King's birthday should be spent reflecting on his life and how he changed America. Confronted by a national government that was looking toward space exploration even as it ignored injustice on the ground, King did not take up arms.
NEWS
By DON AINES | April 3, 2000
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Getting 400 people into a school on a weekend without a basketball game or a dance takes the kind of draw the Franklin County Science & Technology Fair 2000 had Sunday: Space shuttle astronaut Jim Pawelczyk. cont. from news page Pawelczyk, 39, described the sensation of liftoff on his 1998 mission aboard the shuttle Columbia. The doctorate-holding Penn State University physiologist rode along with six other astronauts, 170 rats and about 2,000 fish on the 16-day mission.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | July 10, 1999
Man's first walk on the moon 30 years ago was one of those pivotal moments in history when many people still remember exactly what they were doing when it happened. "The whole family sat around when it was happening," said Waynesboro resident Joe Bowling, recounting the moment he watched it on television. "It was neat. But it seems a waste now," said Bowling. "There are other things to worry about. " The idea of a lunar walk was so unusual that some people didn't believe it was happening, area residents said.
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