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NEWS
March 6, 1997
By TERI JOHNSON Staff Writer Container gardening doesn't have to be expensive, and it is limited only by your imagination. Anything that will hold dirt and water can be used, says Father George Limmer of St. Mary's Catholic Church in Hagerstown, who has been gardening in containers for years. Limmer offers the following advice: Containers You can buy large flowerpots to use, or you can get containers for free. Businesses often recycle or throw away large plastic containers that are perfect for gardening, so don't be afraid to ask, Limmer says.
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NEWS
November 20, 2006
Samantha Spencer, a member of the Boonsboro FFA chapter, competed in the National FFA Agriscience Fair in October during the 79th National FFA Convention in Indianapolis. Her project, "The Dirt on Soil," was on display at the convention.
NEWS
By JEFF RUGG / Creators Syndicate | August 14, 2009
Q: We have a few trees in what we laughingly call our park. Some of the tree roots are sticking above the ground and I am afraid that someone might trip or the roots might be damaged by the maintenance of the grass with lawnmowers and Weedwackers, etc. I researched this somewhat and am now confused. Some say you can cover them with soil and mulch. Some say that would suffocate them and that putting some soil between the roots and then a light layer of mulch over the area might be OK. What's your opinion?
NEWS
By ANNETTE IPSAN | November 20, 2007
What's the upside of raking all those fall leaves? Compost, gardener's gold. Dark, crumbly compost enriches the soil and grows healthier plants. Made from decayed leaves, grass clippings, kitchen scraps and more, compost is simply natural materials broken down into amazing soil food. Sure, Mother Nature breaks down natural stuff like leaves and twigs. But, she takes a long time. Composting speeds up the process to create a nutritious soil amendment in as little as two months.
NEWS
March 2, 2013
The Washington County Master Gardeners will hold a workshop on starter vegetable gardens Saturday, April 20, from 9:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. at Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7303 Sharpsburg Pike in Boonsboro.   Participants will learn how to grow vegetables in small spaces including containers, raised beds, lasagna gardens and bags of soil. The workshop will cover soil testing, site evaluation and timing for best results.   The cost for the hands-on class is $10, which includes take-home seeds and a plant.  To request a registration form, call Diane at 301-791-1304 or send an email to dwoodrin@umd.edu .
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | March 29, 2005
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - A berm made of contaminated soil from an old orchard and standing 23 feet high will be used to separate the 3,200-home Huntfield development from the historic Claymont mansion, officials said at a Charles Town Planning Commission meeting Monday night. A Huntfield official said using the contaminated soil to build the berm does not pose any public health risk and said the berm will be constructed in accordance with state regulations.
NEWS
By JEFF RUGG / Creators Syndicate | April 4, 2009
Q: A local store is selling strawberry pots already filled with strawberry plants, and I was wondering how to take care of them and if this is a good way to grow plants. How long will I get strawberries? A: Strawberry pots can be a great way to grow strawberries, herbs and small annual flowering plants. A strawberry pot is a flower pot, usually less than 2 feet tall, that has a series of holes around the sides where additional plants are planted. They can be made from clay or ceramic pottery, plastic and even wood.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | December 21, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. -Along with some "goodies," Lance and Pam Swartwood of Martinsburg have sent a small tin of dirt from their backyard to three GIs with Berkeley County ties who have done tours of duty in Iraq. "My husband just thinks of things like that," Swartwood said after the couple were thanked Thursday morning by their most recent "adopted" soldier, U.S. Marine Corps Master Sgt. Philip Gardner, who is the son-in-law of Berkeley County Commissioner Ronald K. Collins. Introduced by Collins at the commission's regular meeting, Gardner presented the Swartwoods with an American flag in a wood and glass display case.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | September 4, 2006
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. - A Jefferson County zoning board has scaled back the number of homes to be allowed in a controversial housing subdivision that a local attorney claimed was to be built where there were high levels of DDT, arsenic and diesel fuel. The Paynes Ford Station subdivision was slated to have 201 houses, but the Jefferson County Board of Zoning of Appeals ruled on Aug. 10 that the subdivision will be limited to 37 homes, said Shepherdstown attorney Andy Arnold, who represented adjacent property owners.
NEWS
February 12, 2012
The problem: “Someone should research the reason behind the horrific smell around Antietam Battlefield,” Kendra Harmon wrote in an email. “The smell on most days in Sharpsburg and behind the battlefield on Old Keedysville road is unbearable!” Harmon said she heard the smell was coming from rotting vegetables and wondered why they were left to rot instead of being harvested. Who could fix it: National Park Service What they say: The smell is coming from white radishes that were planted as a winter cover crop for soil- conservation purposes, said Ed Wenschhof, chief ranger at Antietam National Battlefield.
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