Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsSoftware
IN THE NEWS

Software

FEATURED ARTICLES
LIFESTYLE
Kate Coleman | February 28, 2013
“Hello darkness, my old friend.” That's the first line of Paul Simon's 1964 hit, “The Sound of Silence.” Recently, the phrase “Dear Emptiness” appeared on my computer screen as I tried to compose a message to a friend. No, I wasn't trying to add a new verse to the iconic song. The young man's name is Antonis - not emptiness. I was trying to thank him, my computer scientist adviser, for recommending that I upgrade my laptop's operating system so that I would have access to built-in voice recognition.
NEWS
August 12, 2013
The Washington County Board of Education unanimously approved changes to a contract for staff development software and training that will save the school system $4,405, according to a board presentation document. The board approved the original 20-month deal with Teachscape, of San Francisco, last October for $395,861. Changes include a $2,805 reduction to waive the setup fee. The contract also was reduced by $1,600 because the number of users was reduced from 1,700 to 1,500 for this fiscal year, while the number of webinar training sessions was increased from two to four, the document said.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | April 27, 1999
Three Washington County Commissioners on Tuesday expressed frustration about not being told a $2.8 million software package they approved last week was almost $1 million more than another proposal. [cont. from front page ] At an April 20 meeting, Commissioner John L. Schnebly voted against a $2.8 million contract for a package to bring the county's payroll and other financial systems into Year 2000 compliance. He said at the time that he wanted the cost estimates of the six other proposals.
NEWS
by Liz Boch | August 8, 2002
lizb@herald-mail.com In keeping with a continuing effort to help children acquire reading skills, the Greencastle-Antrim School District will begin using new language-processing software in September, according to Superintendent P. Duff Rearick. Called Fast ForWord, the CD-ROM application identifies children in need of reading assistance, Rearick said. Second-graders at Greencastle-Antrim Primary School will pilot the program. "If a kid can read by third grade, you're in business," Rearick said.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | March 5, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- The Hagerstown City Council is to vote March 25 whether to approve spending about $900,000 to replace the city's software system. On Tuesday, Information Technology Manager Scott Nicewarner told the council that the MUNIS software package offered the best option from a short list of three other systems, which ranged in price from $800,000 to $1 million. The new system would replace an outdated one the city has used since the early 1980s, he said. Nicewarner said with the new software, residents would be able to accomplish several tasks, including applying for permits and paying bills.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | March 6, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - The Hagerstown City Council is to vote March 25 on whether to approve spending about $900,000 to replace the city's software system. On Tuesday, Information Technology Manager Scott Nicewarner told the council that the MUNIS software package was the best option from a short list of three other systems, which ranged in price from $800,000 to $1 million. The new system would replace an outdated one the city has used since the early 1980s, he said. Nicewarner said with the new software, residents would be able to do tasks, such as applying for permits and paying bills.
NEWS
May 1, 2007
ANNAPOLIS - The Maryland Department of Agriculture and University of Maryland College of Agriculture and Natural Resources) have announced the release of a new software program that is designed to make annual nutrient management implementation reporting easier for farmers and farm operators. Nutrient Management Reporter for Maryland (NuMan Reporter) is a Windows-based software program that ties in closely with the reporting requirements of the Maryland Nutrient Management Program.
NEWS
September 1, 2008
Washington County Hospital has received an award for saving $1 million in transcription costs. The Million Dollar Savings Award is from eScription Inc. The eScription software used at Washington County Hospital sets up a unique profile for each physician by the type of report he or she is dictating and the vocabulary used in that report. After the initial training period, the software can understand the physician's dictation and will create a complete typed document. The hospital's 16 medical transcriptionists then use the software to edit the document using shortcuts and command keys.
NEWS
March 25, 1997
The $2.1 million would buy: $338,000 - 73 computers and software for classrooms and computer lab at Smithsburg Elementary School. $405,000 - 101 computers and software for classrooms and computer lab, Lincolnshire Elementary School. $490,000 - 175 computers and software to update the seven high school business labs. $336,000 - 120 computers and software to update the computer labs at Hancock, Clear Spring, Williamsport and Boonsboro high schools. $55,000 - 30 computers and software to update the computer lab at Smithsburg High School.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | April 20, 1999
The Washington County Commissioners agreed to spend $2.8 million Tuesday to make the county's payroll and other financial systems Y2K compliant. [cont. from front page ] The contract for software, hardware and training went to Carrera Consulting Group of Sacramento, Calif., and PeopleSoft USA of Atlanta. The vote was 4-1, with Commissioner John L. Schnebly voting no. He said he wanted to see cost estimates from other proposals first. Seven proposals were reviewed by a committee, which made the final recommendation to the commissioners.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 12, 2013
The Washington County Board of Education unanimously approved changes to a contract for staff development software and training that will save the school system $4,405, according to a board presentation document. The board approved the original 20-month deal with Teachscape, of San Francisco, last October for $395,861. Changes include a $2,805 reduction to waive the setup fee. The contract also was reduced by $1,600 because the number of users was reduced from 1,700 to 1,500 for this fiscal year, while the number of webinar training sessions was increased from two to four, the document said.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 24, 2013
Some Sprint customers in areas of Maryland, central Pennsylvania and Virginia were without cellphone service for about an hour and a half  Wednesday  afternoon, according to a company official.  Communications Manager Crystal Davis said a “software issue” caused the service outage at  noon  in areas of the three states. The issue was resolved and service was being restored by about  1:35 p.m. , Davis said.  Officials with the company had not confirmed wireless outages in Maryland as of  1:40 p.m.   Several Sprint customers in Hagerstown reported a loss of cell phone service to The Herald-Mail.  Davis did not know how many customers were affected or the exact areas of each state affected. 
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | April 30, 2013
Brian Ansel and Kris Pearl thought they were going to spend Tuesday morning observing and helping another teacher work with her students at Bester Elementary School, but the pair was surprised when a group of people walked into the classroom with balloons. Schools Superintendent Clayton Wilcox and officials from the Washington County Public Schools Education Foundation then presented Ansel and Pearl with a large ceremonial check for $1,000. “I was amazed. I was astonished. I was overwhelmed.
LIFESTYLE
Kate Coleman | February 28, 2013
“Hello darkness, my old friend.” That's the first line of Paul Simon's 1964 hit, “The Sound of Silence.” Recently, the phrase “Dear Emptiness” appeared on my computer screen as I tried to compose a message to a friend. No, I wasn't trying to add a new verse to the iconic song. The young man's name is Antonis - not emptiness. I was trying to thank him, my computer scientist adviser, for recommending that I upgrade my laptop's operating system so that I would have access to built-in voice recognition.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | February 4, 2013
Washington County Public Schools Superintendent Clayton Wilcox's proposed $254.4 million budget includes 10 contingency teaching positions, a lead teacher for a virtual high school project, and $828,000 in additional teacher pension costs as the state continues to pass along teacher pension costs to local governments, according to the proposed budget and school system spokesman Richard Wright. The proposed budget also includes $1.5 million toward new business software and calls for eliminating several Central Office positions due to reorganization and vacancies, according to the proposal and Wright.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | February 2, 2013
Starting next fall, parents of Washington County Public Schools students will be able to get timely e-alerts with information about their child's grades and notifying them if their child didn't show up for school, according to the school system's director of information management and instructional technology. Parents can access their children's past report cards and school system benchmark assessment results online through a laptop or desktop computer now, Arnold Hammann said. Once the new, almost $1.2 million student information software is installed, parents can choose to be alerted instantly about grades - as soon as a teacher enters them in an electronic gradebook - and school absences with attendance information entered electronically, he said.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 27, 2012
Hours of testimony were offered Wednesday during a public hearing about a recycling center proposed at 206 Madison Ave. in the Borough of Waynesboro. Redemption Recycling, which would be part of the Kaimon Group, would offer recycling of nonferrous materials like aluminum, brass and copper. The recycling center also is asking permission to handle appliances. Classified as a junkyard under local ordinance, the recycling center would be a “conditional use” on the industrially zoned land that used to be The Lumber Yard.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | April 13, 2012
It was the late 1970s. People listened to music on vinyl records, cassette tapes or eight-track cartridges. “Space Invaders” was in the arcades, but hadn't yet hit the home video-game market. And Apple Inc. was still producing text command-based computers. It also was a time when Washington County Public Schools installed Pearson's CIMS software to handle student information, business, accounting and purchasing. Although technological and software advances have led to downloadable music files, video games with realistic graphic detail and hand-held computers, the school system is still using an updated version of CIMS software, said Arnold Hammann, the school system's director of information management and instructional technology.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | October 30, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- A "potentially devastating situation" unfolded Wednesday when the Jefferson County Clerk's Office realized that a new online records search program begun last Friday gave Internet access to individuals' Social Security numbers and other personal information, Jefferson County Clerk Jennifer Maghan said. Maghan said Wednesday afternoon she did not know how many Social Security numbers were accessible online, but she said a software program was being run to redact, or remove, Social Security numbers and that it would take about a month for the software to scan "millions of documents.
NEWS
September 1, 2008
Washington County Hospital has received an award for saving $1 million in transcription costs. The Million Dollar Savings Award is from eScription Inc. The eScription software used at Washington County Hospital sets up a unique profile for each physician by the type of report he or she is dictating and the vocabulary used in that report. After the initial training period, the software can understand the physician's dictation and will create a complete typed document. The hospital's 16 medical transcriptionists then use the software to edit the document using shortcuts and command keys.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|