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Social Skills

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NEWS
by LISA TEDRICK PREJEAN | September 26, 2003
A child gets hurt on the playground. What do the other children do? Stand there and stare? Seek a grown-up's help? Try to comfort the fallen comrade? The ability to show empathy - a sincere, personal understanding of how another person feels - may not come easily to some children. "It's one of the toughest skills to develop," said Cheri J. Meiners, author of "Understand and Care. " The book is part of a "Learning to Get Along" series produced by Free Spirit Publishing.
NEWS
by AL WUNDERLICH | October 31, 2006
Rant "What do you do about social skills?" As a home-schooler, I have been faced with this question many times. It seems to be a common stereotype for a home-schooled teenager. The average thought is, "Well, don't they just shelter themselves from the world and stay inside all day?" People tend to think of home-schoolers as hermit-like kids who spend all day online or reading the dictionary so they can win the National Spelling Bee. Actually, home-schoolers can be just as social or nonsocial as public and private school kids.
NEWS
October 17, 2007
INWOOD, W.Va. - RESA VIII conducted a training for the WVDE Life Skills Program for teachers in grades six, seven and eight. Berkeley and Jefferson county teachers participated in the training program at Musselman High School. The program serves students in grades six, seven and eight throughout West Virginia. Local middle schools represented were: Spring Mills Middle, Chris Godfree; Martinsburg North Middle, Perry McKay; Shepherdstown Middle, Ashley Mussewhite; and Charles Town Middle, Julie Terhoar.
NEWS
September 14, 2000
Preparing to date again see also: The social scene If middle age has brought with it the opportunity to date again, get ready. There's a culture shock waiting. "The social skills have changed, particularly for the women," said Wendee Mason, a personal coach in San Diego. Many women 45 and older have been programmed not to make the first move, Mason said, but now it's considered OK for them to do so. It's acceptable to extend their hand first to introduce themselves, call first or initiate communication through e-mail.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | August 27, 2004
Clinical psychologist Debbie Glasser's tips for easing the transition into preschool or kindergarten include: · Be specific when talking to kids about what they can expect at school, Glasser said. For example, tell them they'll be singing songs and playing on the playground rather than just saying, "You'll have fun. " · Establish night-before-school routines, such as choosing clothes and lunch options - and invite children to help make simple decisions. For example, ask them whether they'd like to wear the blue shirt or the red shirt to school.
NEWS
March 28, 2008
Conference for helping children with special needs Partners for Success Family Support Center and Washington County Public Schools' annual conference entitled "Effective Approaches to Dealing with Challenging Behavior and Social Skills. " The conference is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, March 29, and is open to parents, family members, educators and other professionals interested in helping children with special needs. The conference costs $7 per person and includes workshop materials, refreshments and a bag lunch.
NEWS
By Ruth Anne Callaham | October 8, 2007
Editor's note: Once a month, Washington County Board of Education members and school staff use this space to write about school system issues. This month's column is written by School Board member Ruth Anne Callaham. Old wives have so many tales. One of which is that if you hear it three times it's true. Not particularly an old tale is the concept of children that begin school ready to learn have a higher level of success. You heard or read it three times in less than a week in The Herald-Mail.
NEWS
July 13, 2007
A Maryland report that showed that 35 percent of the Washington County students who entered kindergarten last year did not meet "readiness standards" is cause for concern. Not only do such children need extra attention from teachers, but because of the multitude of things experts say they should know at that age, some might never catch up. Pre-school programs can help, but it's really up to parents to make sure that their children have the skills they need to succeed. The report that the Washington County school system released recently was the Maryland Model for School Readiness Assessment.
NEWS
Lisa Prejean | July 14, 2011
What have your children learned so far this summer? Have they been playing outside? Wonderful. Before we know it, the fall sports season will begin. They'll already be in shape. Have they been reading? Fantastic. Experts tell us that reading is one of the best ways kids can keep their minds active over the summer. Have they practiced a musical instrument? Terrific. Playing musical instruments helps their brains make connections. Have they created something with their hands?
NEWS
By CHAD SMITH / Special to The Herald-Mail | October 12, 2009
October is National Children's Health Month. Being a parent to three kids -- 14 and 11 years old and 11 months old -- this is a subject I have a passion for. With health care in the news 24 hours a day now, we need to really consider the importance of making this generation the healthiest in history for the sake of America's future. What we invest in now pays dividends down the road. Our kids deserve to have the best chance to grow into strong healthy adults so they can enjoy life without restriction.
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NEWS
Lisa Prejean | July 14, 2011
What have your children learned so far this summer? Have they been playing outside? Wonderful. Before we know it, the fall sports season will begin. They'll already be in shape. Have they been reading? Fantastic. Experts tell us that reading is one of the best ways kids can keep their minds active over the summer. Have they practiced a musical instrument? Terrific. Playing musical instruments helps their brains make connections. Have they created something with their hands?
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NEWS
By CHAD SMITH / Special to The Herald-Mail | October 12, 2009
October is National Children's Health Month. Being a parent to three kids -- 14 and 11 years old and 11 months old -- this is a subject I have a passion for. With health care in the news 24 hours a day now, we need to really consider the importance of making this generation the healthiest in history for the sake of America's future. What we invest in now pays dividends down the road. Our kids deserve to have the best chance to grow into strong healthy adults so they can enjoy life without restriction.
NEWS
May 31, 2008
It's who you know that counts To the editor: I graduated from a West Virginia college in 1971. While attending the school (now a university) I had some classes with a student who was always identified as being an ambassador's son. Reportedly his father was from a country where some of my classmates from high school gave up life and limb in its defense. His command of the English language was almost nonexistent. I can only guess at his writing skills. Somehow he managed to get his bachelor's degree and almost immediately his master's degree from a West Virginia university before returning home.
NEWS
March 28, 2008
Conference for helping children with special needs Partners for Success Family Support Center and Washington County Public Schools' annual conference entitled "Effective Approaches to Dealing with Challenging Behavior and Social Skills. " The conference is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, March 29, and is open to parents, family members, educators and other professionals interested in helping children with special needs. The conference costs $7 per person and includes workshop materials, refreshments and a bag lunch.
NEWS
October 17, 2007
INWOOD, W.Va. - RESA VIII conducted a training for the WVDE Life Skills Program for teachers in grades six, seven and eight. Berkeley and Jefferson county teachers participated in the training program at Musselman High School. The program serves students in grades six, seven and eight throughout West Virginia. Local middle schools represented were: Spring Mills Middle, Chris Godfree; Martinsburg North Middle, Perry McKay; Shepherdstown Middle, Ashley Mussewhite; and Charles Town Middle, Julie Terhoar.
NEWS
By Ruth Anne Callaham | October 8, 2007
Editor's note: Once a month, Washington County Board of Education members and school staff use this space to write about school system issues. This month's column is written by School Board member Ruth Anne Callaham. Old wives have so many tales. One of which is that if you hear it three times it's true. Not particularly an old tale is the concept of children that begin school ready to learn have a higher level of success. You heard or read it three times in less than a week in The Herald-Mail.
NEWS
July 13, 2007
A Maryland report that showed that 35 percent of the Washington County students who entered kindergarten last year did not meet "readiness standards" is cause for concern. Not only do such children need extra attention from teachers, but because of the multitude of things experts say they should know at that age, some might never catch up. Pre-school programs can help, but it's really up to parents to make sure that their children have the skills they need to succeed. The report that the Washington County school system released recently was the Maryland Model for School Readiness Assessment.
NEWS
by AL WUNDERLICH | October 31, 2006
Rant "What do you do about social skills?" As a home-schooler, I have been faced with this question many times. It seems to be a common stereotype for a home-schooled teenager. The average thought is, "Well, don't they just shelter themselves from the world and stay inside all day?" People tend to think of home-schoolers as hermit-like kids who spend all day online or reading the dictionary so they can win the National Spelling Bee. Actually, home-schoolers can be just as social or nonsocial as public and private school kids.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | August 27, 2004
Clinical psychologist Debbie Glasser's tips for easing the transition into preschool or kindergarten include: · Be specific when talking to kids about what they can expect at school, Glasser said. For example, tell them they'll be singing songs and playing on the playground rather than just saying, "You'll have fun. " · Establish night-before-school routines, such as choosing clothes and lunch options - and invite children to help make simple decisions. For example, ask them whether they'd like to wear the blue shirt or the red shirt to school.
NEWS
by LISA TEDRICK PREJEAN | September 26, 2003
A child gets hurt on the playground. What do the other children do? Stand there and stare? Seek a grown-up's help? Try to comfort the fallen comrade? The ability to show empathy - a sincere, personal understanding of how another person feels - may not come easily to some children. "It's one of the toughest skills to develop," said Cheri J. Meiners, author of "Understand and Care. " The book is part of a "Learning to Get Along" series produced by Free Spirit Publishing.
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