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NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | March 14, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- Picture a group of teens sitting around after school waiting to see the latest "scare" film about the effects of tobacco use on some old geezers. Suddenly, the face of a young person flashes across the screen. The young person has a name -- Brandon. What he doesn't have is a big toe, then a foot, then a leg below the calf and finally, the second leg is gone. What Brandon has is Buerger's Disease, which is almost exclusively triggered by the use of tobacco, said James Crowley, who has spent more than 25 years training teachers to help teenagers quit the habit.
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NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | March 15, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - Picture a group of teens sitting around after school waiting to see the latest "scare" film about the effects of tobacco use on some old geezers. Suddenly, the face of a young person flashes across the screen. The young person has a name - Brandon. What he doesn't have is a big toe, then a foot, then a leg below the calf and finally, the second leg is gone. What Brandon has is Buerger's Disease, which is almost exclusively triggered by the use of tobacco, said James Crowley, who has spent more than 25 years training teachers to help teenagers quit the habit.
NEWS
October 14, 1999
By JULIE E. GREENE / Staff Writer photo: RICHARD T. MEAGHER / staff photographer INWOOD, W.Va. - Lora Chetel is tired of watching people, including other teenagers, subject themselves to the hazards of smoking. The Musselman High School junior said she's had plenty of opportunities to smoke a cigarette, but she never has. "It's gross," said Chetel, a member of Musselman's Peers Against Tobacco. "At the old high school, the bathrooms just reeked," said Chetel, 15, of Bunker Hill.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | May 21, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - The first time Brian Kelly quit smoking, in the 1990s, he had nicotine cravings like crazy even though he was using a nicotine patch and nicotine gum. This year when Kelly decided again to try to kick the habit he returned to the patch and gum, until he read on the Internet about Chantix, a prescription anti-smoking pill approved a year ago by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. "It's like a wonder drug as far as I'm concerned," said Kelly, 63, of Martinsburg.
NEWS
April 22, 1999
Should Pennsylvania's share of a $246 billion tobacco settlement be used only for anti-smoking and other health-related causes, or can some of it be spent for other purposes? That's the debate facing Pennsylvania state lawmakers now. Considering some of the oddball proposals now surfacing, citizens ought to pay close attention. For example, one proposal would use $1 million of the cash to clean grime off the ornate marble of the 93-year-old state capital building, on the premise that decades of heavy smoking deposited at least some of the dirt there.
NEWS
February 2, 1999
By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer, Waynesboro photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Willa Mayhugh isn't about to give up smoking without a fight. The 67-year-old Waynesboro grandmother wanted so much to smoke while a cancer patient that she would walk out of the hospital toting her mobile IV unit to the bus stop across the street to have a cigarette. "There I was with my IV pole, a chemotherapy bag on my stomach and a catheter in my heart, standing on the street smoking," she said.
NEWS
By LEIGH HAMRICK, Special to The Herald-Mail | October 9, 2009
I'm disgusted by how acceptable it is for a pregnant woman to smoke. For me, there isn't any gray area when it comes to smoking during pregnancy. It's wrong, period. Any argument made to the contrary is designed merely to excuse a smoker's habit, regardless of its consequences to others. Study after study has proven that smoking is carcinogenic, both to the smoker and to anyone else forced to inhale the smoke. Not only that, but smoking is linked to a host of problems, including low birth weight, premature birth, placenta abruption, miscarriage, stillbirth and retarded fetal development.
NEWS
By TARA REILLY | June 19, 2004
HAGERSTOWN While you may already know some of the effects of smoking and secondhand smoke, here's something that may surprise you. Kindergartners and first-grade students are packing their mouths with chewing tobacco, and the number of young children doing it appears to be on the rise, Keisha Hanson, community health educator for the Washington County Health Department, said Friday. She said health officials noticed the trend while visiting schools to spread the word on the effects of smoking and tobacco use. "It seems as if their fathers give it to them, just as sort of a right of initiation," said Kimberly Rasch, Health Department project manager for the Cigarette Restitution Fund Program.
NEWS
Madge Miles | Around Jonathan Street | May 26, 2011
Movie night The movie "Beverly Hills Chihuahua 2" will be shown Saturday at 7 p.m. at Bridge of Life Church, 14 S. Potomac St. The movie is free. Free popcorn and drinks will be available while supplies last. Summer camp Although all of the classes are full, you can put your child's name on a waiting list for summer camp, which will begin June 13 at Memorial Recreation Center, 131 W. North St. in Hagerstown. The camp is for those in grades one to six. For more information, call 301-790-0203.
NEWS
BY BOB MAGINNIS | March 5, 2002
Compared to the battles over video poker and the restructuring of the family court system, West Virginia Gov. Bob Wise's proposal to take an advance payment on the state's share of the national tobacco tax settlement hasn't drawn much attention. It should, because a wrong move on this issue could affect the state for decades to come. Wise's proposal would have the state take $600 million now, instead of waiting 25 years for payments that could eventually total $1.9 billion. If the state waits for the money, it has to assume that the tobacco companies will still be in business years from now. Is that a valid assumption?
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