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NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | October 8, 1999
Janet and Charles Hesler showed up at an informational meeting Friday morning opposing a proposal to put sludge on a neighbor's farm, but their objections quickly dissipated. "Information tends to kill a lot of dragons," Janet Hesler said after the meeting. Charles Hesler said he came away from the meeting satisfied with the information he was given. Donald Beard applied for a Maryland Department of the Environment permit to use sludge as fertilizer on 25 acres of a 40-acre farm his family has owned for several generations.
NEWS
October 6, 1999
Informational meeting for a sludge permit 10:30 a.m. Friday, Oct. 8 Washington County Health Department Second Floor Auditorium 1302 Pennsylvania Ave., Hagerstown By SCOTT BUTKI / Staff Writer A Washington County father and son have applied for a permit to use sludge as fertilizer on 25 acres of a 40-acre farm that has been in their family for several generations. An informational meeting on the request is scheduled for 10:30 a.m. Friday at the Washington County Health Department, said Roderick A. MacRae, director of environmental health for the Washington County Health Department.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | September 5, 2006
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - A southern West Virginia man who is worried about an elementary school that sits below a 385-foot-tall sludge dam in his community on Monday brought his campaign for a new school to Shepherdstown. Marsh Fork Elementary School is 400 yards downstream from the sludge dam that is part of a large coal mining operation near the community of Sundial, W.Va. The sludge dam holds about 2 billion gallons of sludge, according to the Pennies of Promise campaign.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | April 10, 2003
scottb@herald-mail.com The Hagerstown Planning Commission wants the city to consider finding money to dredge the Hagerstown City Park lake because of an increasing problem with what one commission member called "muck and sludge. " At the city's request, the Planning Commission reviewed the proposed $15.8 million city Capital Improvement Program budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1. The proposed budget includes $250,000 for the final phase of work to replace the stone wall that surrounds the lake, which has deteriorated over time.
NEWS
August 8, 2000
County approves hauling contract By SCOTT BUTKI / Staff Writer The Washington County Commissioners will pay Waste Management of Shenandoah Valley about $240,600 to haul away local sludge for about four months until the county's new landfill opens. The Forty West Landfill is scheduled to open around December 2000. It will replace the Resh Sanitary Landfill, which county officials have said they expect to close around November because it will be full. Waste Management will haul sludge from the Conococheague Wastewater Treatment Plant to the Mountain View Reclamation Landfill in Greencastle, Pa. The commissioners approved the contract during their meeting Tuesday.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | January 30, 2003
Pretreated sewage overflowed from the Conococheague Waste Water Treatment Plant Wednesday morning and spilled into a tributary of Conococheague Creek, said Laurie Bucher, director of environmental health for the Washington County Health Department. Bucher said the overflow was minor and that fewer than 1,000 gallons of foamy sludge worked its way into an unnamed stream behind the plant. The overflow happened from 5:30 to 7:30 a.m. She said crews posted signs along the streams and notified nearby residents of the overflow, but that the spill wasn't expected to cause any problems.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | May 15, 2006
Jonathan Kays' office features the usual family photos, two computers and a chair that glides back and forth between the two. But there also is a plaque honoring him as 2004 Extension Forester of the Year, a box of T-shirts and hats emblazoned with "Biosolids and Forests Research and Extension Team" and a book on his shelf titled "Tree Nuts" - not everyone can say that. Kays, 51, is an extension specialist in natural resources at the Western Maryland Research and Education Center south of Hagerstown.
NEWS
December 2, 1997
State hits Clean Rock with soil-handling complaint By BRENDAN KIRBY Staff Writer A state agency has filed an administrative complaint against Clean Rock Industries Inc., alleging the company has improperly processed oil-contaminated soil in violation of its permit. The Maryland Department of Environment is seeking a $7,500 civil judgment against Clean Rock, said Quentin Banks, a spokesman for the department. He said the agency brought the action on Nov. 17 against Clean Rock, a company that converts petroleum-contaminated soil into asphalt.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | February 11, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Many Eastern Panhandle residents are expected to be charged more for garbage collection by this summer, but the amount of the increase appears to have been somewhat tempered by the West Virginia Public Service Commission. Garbage haulers who dispose of trash at the North Mountain landfill near Hedgesville, W.Va., are expected to pass a pending rate increase wanted by dump site operator LCS Services Inc., onto their customers, officials said Tuesday. Exactly how much of an increase residents ultimately will be charged could vary between haulers, but officials have estimated a 20 percent hike is possible.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | March 26, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The Maryland Occupational Safety and Health agency is investigating the explosion that tore a hole in the roof of a building at a City of Hagerstown wastewater treatment plant. Since the explosion March 13, city officials say some operations have resumed at the building where a private company turned sewage into fertilizer. Donald Barton, wastewater operations manager for the City of Hagerstown, said Sunday that Synagro, which works under contract with the city, now presses sludge before sending it on to the landfill.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | February 11, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Many Eastern Panhandle residents are expected to be charged more for garbage collection by this summer, but the amount of the increase appears to have been somewhat tempered by the West Virginia Public Service Commission. Garbage haulers who dispose of trash at the North Mountain landfill near Hedgesville, W.Va., are expected to pass a pending rate increase wanted by dump site operator LCS Services Inc., onto their customers, officials said Tuesday. Exactly how much of an increase residents ultimately will be charged could vary between haulers, but officials have estimated a 20 percent hike is possible.
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NEWS
April 19, 2008
Thumbs up to The Herald-Mail's Advertising Department, for the hard work and imagination it took to win 13 awards in the 2007 Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association ad contest. Highlights include a "best of category" for Robin Straley and Kathy Gelwicks for a Martins Furniture ad. The two won an additional first place for a Spicher's Appliances ad, while Angie Sease and Cherish Harvey won for Blazin' Auto. Sease, Heather Guessford and Michele Wills took first place in community service.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | March 26, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The Maryland Occupational Safety and Health agency is investigating the explosion that tore a hole in the roof of a building at a City of Hagerstown wastewater treatment plant. Since the explosion March 13, city officials say some operations have resumed at the building where a private company turned sewage into fertilizer. Donald Barton, wastewater operations manager for the City of Hagerstown, said Sunday that Synagro, which works under contract with the city, now presses sludge before sending it on to the landfill.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | March 14, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - An explosion Tuesday tore a hole in the roof of a building where a company turns sludge into fertilizer for the City of Hagerstown at a water-treatment facility on Frederick Street. One man sustained minor injuries but declined treatment after the early-evening explosion, according to Mike Spiker, director of utilities for the City of Hagerstown. Soot covered the edges of a jagged hole in the roof of a beige building near the back of the city's treatment plant.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | September 5, 2006
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - A southern West Virginia man who is worried about an elementary school that sits below a 385-foot-tall sludge dam in his community on Monday brought his campaign for a new school to Shepherdstown. Marsh Fork Elementary School is 400 yards downstream from the sludge dam that is part of a large coal mining operation near the community of Sundial, W.Va. The sludge dam holds about 2 billion gallons of sludge, according to the Pennies of Promise campaign.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | May 15, 2006
Jonathan Kays' office features the usual family photos, two computers and a chair that glides back and forth between the two. But there also is a plaque honoring him as 2004 Extension Forester of the Year, a box of T-shirts and hats emblazoned with "Biosolids and Forests Research and Extension Team" and a book on his shelf titled "Tree Nuts" - not everyone can say that. Kays, 51, is an extension specialist in natural resources at the Western Maryland Research and Education Center south of Hagerstown.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | March 24, 2006
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. Jefferson County Commission members said Thursday they have heard about a proposal to dispose of Washington, D.C.'s sewage sludge in Jefferson County and said they are concerned how the operation could affect the county's environment. Commission President Greg Corliss said he heard the proposal involves bringing the sewage sludge to the county and putting it on a field. Corliss said he does not know any additional details about the proposal. Commission members talked about trying to get more information from state officials.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | April 10, 2003
scottb@herald-mail.com The Hagerstown Planning Commission wants the city to consider finding money to dredge the Hagerstown City Park lake because of an increasing problem with what one commission member called "muck and sludge. " At the city's request, the Planning Commission reviewed the proposed $15.8 million city Capital Improvement Program budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1. The proposed budget includes $250,000 for the final phase of work to replace the stone wall that surrounds the lake, which has deteriorated over time.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | March 4, 2003
waynesboro@herald-mail.com Paul Martin, a lifelong Mercersburg-area farmer, said Monday he doesn't know why so many residents are up in arms because he spreads sewage sludge over his fields instead of chemical fertilizers. It saves him money, he said. "I don't think I could stay in business if I didn't have it," said Martin, 66, who has been working his family farm along Pa. 75 in Montgomery Township since he was 16. His father farmed it before him. The biosolids - what's left after treatment of raw sewage in treatment plants - don't cost Martin anything.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | January 30, 2003
Pretreated sewage overflowed from the Conococheague Waste Water Treatment Plant Wednesday morning and spilled into a tributary of Conococheague Creek, said Laurie Bucher, director of environmental health for the Washington County Health Department. Bucher said the overflow was minor and that fewer than 1,000 gallons of foamy sludge worked its way into an unnamed stream behind the plant. The overflow happened from 5:30 to 7:30 a.m. She said crews posted signs along the streams and notified nearby residents of the overflow, but that the spill wasn't expected to cause any problems.
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