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Slot Machines

NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | February 7, 2008
ANNAPOLIS - By a split vote, Washington County's General Assembly delegation on Wednesday killed an effort to add a state level of regulation to the county's ban on electronic tip jars. The bill was prompted by concern from Washington County Gaming Director James B. Hovis that gaming interests would try to bring in slot-machine-style tip jars, whose legality have been questioned. "It's our desire to protect the integrity of Washington County gaming," Hovis told the delegation.
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NEWS
January 3, 2008
An Associated Press summary of Maryland taxes on page A3 of Wednesday's Herald-Mail mentioned a new tax on the proceeds of bingo games and tip jars. Actually, the tax only applies to electronic bingo games and electronic tip jars ? the ones similar to slot machines, but not the ones that simply dispense tickets, said Daniel Riley, assistant director of the state comptroller's compliance division. Washington County has electronic machines that dispense tip-jar tickets and are not subject to the tax, but none that are slot machine-style, said James B. Hovis, director of the county's gaming office.
NEWS
December 2, 2007
We asked members of The Herald-Mail's Opinion Club the following question: Gov. Martin O'Malley signed into law a $1.3 billion tax package and a measure that will put slot machines to a statewide vote. Sen. Brian Frosh, D-Montgomery, posed the question, "Will people recognize it as hard choices that had to be made or as government run amok?" What's your answer? (The Herald-Mail Opinion club responds to random questions on random issues. If you would like to be included in the Opinion Club mailing list, e-mail opinionclub@herald-mail.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | November 25, 2007
If Maryland wants to legalize slot machines, fine. If some of those machines are installed at the Rocky Gap resort near Cumberland, so much the better - that might be what it takes to turn the tide at the monetary sinkhole. But if those two proposals come to pass, local lawmakers should be forceful in delivering this message to the rest of the state: Our Interstate highways, and our roads in general, can barely handle the traffic they have now, much less what they will have if a thousand people or so are driving through each day on their way to Rocky Gap. No one around here needs a Thanksgiving weekend to be reminded of the fact that Interstates 70 and 81 routinely become mollassified on Friday and Sunday evenings.
NEWS
November 1, 2007
"What do you think about a flat tax like Canada? Something like 15 percent across the board for everyone, then do away with the IRS and filing of income tax returns. How much money would the U.S. save getting rid of the IRS? We could probably balance the budget rather quickly. " - Smithsburg "Congressman John Murtha falsely accused Lance Cpl. Sharrat of murder. 'No fire fight, killed in cold blood.' Sharrat's father hired a lawyer. This Marine was exonerated, had a witness of the incident.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | October 24, 2007
Electronic tip jar machines that do not use pre-printed tickets were outlawed Tuesday by the Washington County Commissioners. Gaming Commission Director James B. Hovis asked the county commissioners to revise the county's tip jar regulations to prevent establishments from using the machines, which he said look and operate like slot machines. "We want to ensure that the traditional method of tip jars will continue," Hovis said. "With these changes, it will be clear for everyone what is allowed and what is prohibited.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | October 23, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY ? Electronic tip jar machines that do not use pre-printed tickets were outlawed Tuesday by the Washington County Commissioners. Gaming Commission Director James B. Hovis asked the county commissioners to revise the county's tip jar regulations to prevent establishments from using the machines, which he said look and operate like slot machines. "We want to ensure that the traditional method of tip jars will continue," Hovis said. "With these changes, it will be clear for everyone what is allowed and what is prohibited.
NEWS
September 27, 2007
When it comes to Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to close the state's budget gap, the only good news is that there is a plan. How that plan will affect Washington County is something that's not yet certain. In last week's announcement of the package that he hopes to take to a special session of the General Assembly in November, O'Malley began by saying that the gap between state spending and expected revenues was not $1.5 billion, but $1.7 billion. To close it, the governor proposes to do the following: ยท Increase the state's sales tax from 5 percent to 6 percent.
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