Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsSlot Machines
IN THE NEWS

Slot Machines

NEWS
By DON AINES | September 6, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- When Penn National Gaming acquired the Charles Town Racetrack in 1997, it employed 238 people and nightly purses for the ponies totaled about $20,000, said Roger Ramey, vice president for public affairs at what has grown to become Charles Town Races & Slots. Eleven years and more than $300 million later, Charles Town Races & Slots employs more than 1,300 people and purses have grown to exceed $180,000 per night, General Manager Al Britton said. That investment includes $21 million for The Inn at Charles Town, where West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin cut the ribbon Saturday morning.
Advertisement
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | August 31, 2008
HANCOCK - Since leaving Hancock more than 30 years ago, Stanley Fulton Jr. has founded gaming equipment companies, opened casinos, acquired a racetrack and built a gaming empire that he sold for $340 million, but through it all, he hasn't forgotten the small town where he grew up. Hancock Town Manager David Smith said that when he called Fulton in June to ask for funding to repair the town's swimming pool, the wealthy former resident asked what...
NEWS
August 18, 2008
Upcoming Hagerstown-Washington County Chamber of Commerce events will focus on electricity supply, slot machines, politics, and the races for Congress and Washington County Board of Education. Sept. 10 at 7:30 a.m. at Duffy's on Potomac in Hagerstown: As part of the Chamber's Eggs & Issues speakers' series, Russell Frisby, former chairman of the Maryland Public Service Commission, will talk about the placement of a power line in southern Washington County. Frisby is a spokesman for Marylanders for Reliable Power, a coalition that favors improving electricity infrastructure.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | August 6, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot used an appearance at a Hagerstown business breakfast Tuesday to lobby further against this fall's slots referendum. Franchot called the legalization of slots a "virus" that consumes lawmakers' thoughts in Annapolis and prevents them from creating fiscal solutions. "It mesmerizes people," he said. Voters in Maryland will decide in November whether to amend the state constitution and allow 15,000 slot machines in five counties.
NEWS
June 19, 2008
Slots will cause, not solve, our problems To the editor: As a veteran of the slot machine wars of the 1960s, I appeal to voters to consider thoughtfully your vote on the November referendum to legalize slot-machine gambling in Maryland. Many people argue that they enjoy playing slot machines and that they should not be denied that right. Their pleasure is paid for by some of our poorest citizens, who hope that gambling will offer them their only chance to escape poverty.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 16, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- Two of Maryland's top Democrats exchanged public pleasantries during Thursday's annual Washington County Democratic Central Committee dinner. But Sen. Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., the Senate president, wasn't pleased when Comptroller Peter V.R. Franchot denounced slot machines during his keynote address. Miller sat expressionless as Franchot called an effort to legalize slot-machine gambling "a race to the bottom" for Maryland. Franchot predicted the state would start with 15,000 slot machines, as a November constitutional amendment proposes, then expand to 30,000 slots a year later, then "full-blown casinos.
NEWS
May 11, 2008
Editor's note: Each week, The Herald-Mail invites readers to answer poll questions on its Web site, www.herald-mail.com. Readers also may submit comments about the poll question when voting. Each Sunday, a sampling of edited reader comments will run in The Herald-Mail. Last week there were three poll questions. The first question was: Would receiving a break on your property taxes make it worthwhile to have slot machines in your state? "It's like taking a bucket of water from the deep end of a pool and dumping it into the shallow end. Funny thing - the water in the shallow end doesn't get any deeper.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | March 16, 2008
ANNAPOLIS - The possibility that Washington County would be caught up in a statewide crackdown on electronic gaming appears to have been eliminated, the county's gaming director said Friday. An emergency bill to phase out slots-style electronic gambling machines has moved quickly through the Maryland Senate, which gave preliminary approval Friday. An early, broadly written draft also would have prohibited certain tip-jar dispensing machines in Washington County, but an amendment changed that.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | March 15, 2008
ANNAPOLIS -- The possibility that Washington County would be caught up in a statewide crackdown on electronic gaming appears to have been eliminated, the county's gaming director said Friday. An emergency bill to phase out slots-style electronic gambling machines has moved quickly through the Maryland Senate, which gave preliminary approval Friday. An early, broadly written draft also would have prohibited certain tip-jar dispensing machines in Washington County, but an amendment changed that.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | February 28, 2008
ANNAPOLIS - Top lawmakers on Wednesday said they're pushing for a statewide legislative crackdown of electronic gaming, an effort that might affect a small percentage of tip-jar machines in Washington County. The emergency bill is aimed at a proliferation of unregulated slot-style gambling machines, particularly in St. Mary's and Charles counties, said Sen. Thomas M. Middleton, D-Charles, a sponsor. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., D-Calvert/Prince George's, and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, D-Anne Arundel, also spoke strongly in favor of the effort.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|