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NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | January 13, 2003
laurae@herald-mail.com Maryland Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich set the stage for the battle over slot machines last week in a friendly but firm message to his counterparts in the Republican Caucus. Ehrlich sat before the group and acknowledged there will be times when they disagree with his administration's positions. "If it's moral or religious, there's no discussion. It's understood and that's the end of the discussion," he said. But if it's anything else, he said he wants a chance to talk to them privately.
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NEWS
By LARRY YANOS | November 9, 2008
When he started the Cracked Claw Off-Track Betting Parlor and restaurant in 1994, proprietor John Poole was excited about the prospect of Maryland getting slot machines. The chance to wager on thoroughbred and harness racing paired with slot machines would attract many gamblers to the Frederick County facility. Back then, discussions were under way by Gov. Parris Glendening and lawmakers to place slots at the state racetracks as well as some designated off-track betting parlors in the Free State.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | March 16, 1999
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Lucky gamblers soon will hear the clink of coins at Charles Town Races. The local thoroughbred track, which won the right to install video lottery machines in 1996, is preparing to outfit its gaming parlor with slot machines, thanks to a bill passed by the West Virginia Legislature. Although plans for the new games are in the early stages, the track will install an estimated 800 to 850 slot machines by the end of the year, said Bill Bork Jr., director of marketing at Charles Town Races.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND and CANDICE BOSELY | January 13, 2003
andrear@herald-mail.com martinsburg@herald-mail.com As the debate about legalizing slot machines at Maryland racetracks heats up in Annapolis, state residents were asked whether they support a referendum on the issue. Most people interviewed from Frederick, Md., to Hagerstown on Saturday said they wanted their voices to be heard at the state capitol. "We're a democracy," said Dan West, 18, of Hagerstown. "The people should have a voice. " Joe Twigg, 46, of Cumberland, Md., agreed that voters should be able to decide the issue.
NEWS
July 6, 2004
Maryland's elected officials, who've been fighting for two years over whether or not to legalize slot machines, on Monday got what state Senate President Thomas V. "Mike" Miller called a "wake-up call. " Miller's alarm clark rang, so to speak, when Pennsylvania's legislature passed a bill to place 61,000 slot machines in 14 locations around the state. Miller predicted a special session would be held in August - and that it would pass a slots bill. But that idea doesn't sit well with House Speaker Michael Busch, who'd rather have a referendum on slots this coming November.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | January 2, 1999
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Operators of the local thoroughbred racetrack say they want their video lottery machines to pay out winnings in coins rather than the current paper validation slips. Players want coin payouts so they can move freely from machine to machine, said Bill Bork Jr., director of marketing at PNGI Charles Town Races. Currently, players who win money on video lottery machines receive a slip of paper from the machines that reveal their winnings. Players then have to take the slips to a validation window to be cashed.
NEWS
March 28, 2003
When Maryland's horse track owners took the position that the proposed bill to legalize slot machines would give them barely enough revenue to make a profit, we were skeptical. Now a University of Maryland economics professor has done an analysis that backs our view. And so once again we say: If the tracks aren't ready to accept less, the state should seek proposals from other would-be operators. The study comes from Robert Carpenter, economics professor at the university's Baltimore County campus.
NEWS
October 17, 2008
Will you vote in favor of legalizing slot machines in Maryland? Yes, Charles Town is too far to drive 26 votes (11 percent) Yes, they'll help education funding 69 votes (29 percent) Yes, for other reasons 63 votes (26 percent) No, they're a budget gimmick 18 votes (7 percent) No, they'll cut into tip-jar sales 2 votes (1 percent) No, for other reasons 64 votes (26 percent) o Votes received as of 10:30 a.m. Thursday on www.herald-mail.
NEWS
July 15, 1997
By DON AINES Staff Writer A proposal by Bally's Maryland Inc. to locate an off-track betting parlor near Hagerstown was prompted in part by the legislature's decision not to legalize slot machines at Maryland race tracks, an attorney for the company said. "They expected that there would be a change in the gaming laws to allow slots at race tracks," Dennis McCoy, an Annapolis attorney representing Bally's Maryland, which has an interest in two Maryland tracks, said Monday.
NEWS
May 20, 2002
When Republican Congressman Robert Ehrlich Jr. and Democratic Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend - both running for governor - came to Washington County on consecutive days last weekend, staff writer Andrew Schotz asked each a series of questions about these issues: - Funding for a University System of Maryland Hagerstown Education Center, and its planned location at the Baldwin House complex in downtown Hagerstown. - Parole for offenders sentenced to life in prison. - Maryland's death penalty moratorium.
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