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Slavery

NEWS
March 24, 2007
Those in the profile have a right to back President Bush To the editor: Gene Weingarten's column (Feb. 18) reports that a mere 17 percent in this country strongly supports President Bush's work. He then embellishes his comments by profiling a typical member of this group as closely resembling Foxworthy's "You may be a redneck if... " To his credit he portrays at least one member accurately. I was raised in the hills 70 miles west of Hagerstown. I had read the Bible cover to cover by the age of 12. I own four guns and was well-versed in the use of outhouses.
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NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | March 4, 2007
ANNAPOLIS - Maryland's Senate has been asked to make a soul-baring statement of remorse about the state's slave-holding past. "It is time for the State of Maryland to acknowledge the role the State played in maintaining the institution of slavery and its attendant evils," a proposed resolution reads. An expression of "profound regret" is overdue, said state Sen. Nathaniel Exum, D-Prince George's, who sponsored the resolution. A symbolic measure, its weight is in its remorse.
NEWS
March 4, 2007
FOR the purpose of expressing regret for the role that Maryland played in instituting and maintaining slavery and for the discrimination that was slavery's legacy. WHEREAS, The State of Maryland relied on slavery for 200 years; and WHEREAS, To meet the needs of its economy, Maryland prior to 1808 imported men, women, and children, torn from their homes in Africa and subjected to the brutality of the Middle Passage; and WHEREAS, Maryland citizens trafficked in human flesh until the adoption of the Constitution of 1864; and WHEREAS, Slavery subjected its victims to unspeakable cruelties, including beatings, rape, and the forcible separation of family members from one another; and WHEREAS, A native of Maryland, nurtured by the slave culture of our State, wrote the Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision declaring African Americans incapable of citizenship because they had "no rights which the white man was bound to respect"; and WHEREAS, Slavery fostered a climate of oppression not only for slaves and their descendants but also for people of color who moved to Maryland subsequent to slavery's abolition; and WHEREAS, Slavery's legacy has afflicted the citizens of our State down to the present; and WHEREAS, Slavery and discrimination are utterly contrary to the principles that this Nation and this State profess; and WHEREAS, It is time for the State of Maryland to acknowledge the role the State played in maintaining the institution...
NEWS
February 9, 2005
Wednesday, Feb. 9 9 p.m. on PBS "Slavery and the Making of America" This new four-part documentary focuses on how slavery was an important element in making the United States a rich and powerful nation. "Slavery was no sideshow in American history," says historian James Horton. "It was the main event. " Morgan Freeman narrates. Concludes at the same time next week. 10 p.m. on ABC "Wife Swap" In an episode that may bring unwelcome echoes of that long political season, the women changing places tonight are an anti-gay Texan and a lesbian mother from Arizona.
NEWS
by Thomas G. Clemens | October 24, 2004
The recent flurry of letters from neo-Confederates asserting that slavery had no role in the Civil War is troubling, as they seem doggedly determined to force counterfactual information on the public. The trend towards "true Southern history," minimizing the slavery issue by insisting that all of America was racist, and that slaves fought for the Confederacy is a spurious and disingenuous argument. Using half-truths and outright misinformation, they try to avoid what any serious historian of the Civil War recognizes as a major issue of the war. Having studied the Civil War since my early teens and teaching it on a college level here in Hagerstown and at George Mason University, I feel qualified to point out a few holes in their argument.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | February 1, 2004
A series on the Underground Railroad in the Tri-State area; Sunday, Jan. 25: An overview of the Underground Railroad Today: Slavery and the path to freedom in West Virginia. Sunday, Feb. 8: A look at the history of Washington County and other parts of Maryland as slaves sought freedom. Sunday, Feb. 15: Fugitive slaves reached free soil when they crossed into Pennsylvania, but that did not mean they were safe from slave catchers. andrear@herald-mail.
NEWS
by DON AINES | October 6, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the grave, but the former boarding house where he planned the Harpers Ferry, W.Va., raid is in good repair, thanks to the Kittochtinny Historical Society and the Boonsboro man who provided it with the money to purchase the property. The society on Sunday honored Wilbur R. McElroy and family as benefactors of the John Brown House at a reception attended by about 80 people at King Street United Brethren Church.
NEWS
by BONNIE HELLUM BRECHBILL | February 3, 2003
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Dr. James Oliver Horton said that when he moved to Virginia 27 years ago, he was surprised to find that the Civil War was still very much alive there. "People would talk about it as if it was still going on," he said. Virginians often referred to the Civil War as "the late unpleasantness. " Horton, a panelist on The History Channel's weekly program "The History Center," addressed attendees of the "Lincoln and His Era: Myths and Realities" seminar at the Four Points Sheraton in Chambersburg on Saturday.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | February 3, 2003
andrear@herald-mail.com Blacks in Washington County share a local history rooted along a less-than-one-quarter-mile stretch in downtown Hagerstown. Jonathan Street has housed, fed, entertained - and sometimes frightened - many of its black residents for more than two centuries. Jonathan Street is so named only through the black district. The street is mostly white on each end, where it's known as Summit Avenue to the south and Forest Drive to the north. That is a point of contention among those who believe this makes it easy for the city to profile a Jonathan Street address as a black address.
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