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NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | February 8, 2004
Editor's note: This is the third part of a four-part series on the Underground Railroad in the Tri-State area: Sunday, Jan. 25: An overview of the Underground Railroad Sunday, Feb. 1: Slavery and the path to freedom in West Virginia. Today: A look at the history of Washington County and other parts of Maryland as slaves sought freedom. Sunday, Feb. 15: Fugitive slaves reached free soil when they crossed into Pennsylvania, but that did not mean they were safe from slave catchers.
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NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | February 15, 2004
Editor's note: This is the fourth and final part of a series on the Underground Railroad in the Tri-State area: Sunday, Jan. 25: An overview of the Underground Railroad Sunday, Feb. 1: Slavery and the path to freedom in West Virginia. Sunday, Feb. 8: A look at the history of Washington County and other parts of Maryland as slaves sought freedom. Today: Fugitive slaves reached free soil when they crossed into Pennsylvania, but that did not mean they were safe from slave catchers.
NEWS
By DON AINES | February 29, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Documenting the path and history of the Underground Railroad through Franklin County is a daunting task, precisely because those who used and operated it were acting in secret. Much of what is known about the system of routes and safe houses used by fleeing slaves is anecdotal - stories passed from generation to generation, rumors and old newspaper stories written decades after the Civil War ended the need for the Underground Railroad. In 2007, the Franklin County Underground Railroad Coalition was formed by the county's Visitors Bureau, which identified 20 sites with potential connections to the Underground Railroad, said Janet Pollard, director of the bureau.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | December 26, 2012
The American Civil War has been very good for a Charles Town author who, in the last six years, has been researching the area's history for material for historical novels based on real people and real situations connected with that conflict. Bob O'Connor has just finished his fifth novel, “The Return of Catesby,” the story of a slave who was born in Jefferson County. The latest is a sequel to “Catesby: Eyewitness to the Civil War,” which O'Connor published in 2008. The new book comes out in January.
NEWS
by DARCY SHULL | March 6, 2007
Review Picture this: You are in church. As everyone stands for the next hymn, you recognize the song in just a few notes from the organ, and you all begin to sing "Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound. " Sure, you've known that song practically your whole life. But do you know who wrote it? Or what it means? I bet not. The song is now the theme of the movie "Amazing Grace," which tells a story of one man's life and his fight for the abolition of the British slave trade in the late 1700s and early 1800s.
LIFESTYLE
June 24, 2011
Author Christopher Webber is the guest of honor at the Washington County Free Library's fundraiser from 7 to 8 p.m. Thursday, July 14, at Washington County Fine Arts Museum, City Park, Hagerstown. The fundraiser benefits the Western Maryland Room and the Museum's Children's Educational Programs. Webber is the author of the newly released book "American to the Backbone: The Life of James W.C. Pennington. The Fugitive Slave Who Became One of the First Black Abolitionists. " A light reception and book signing will follow the presentation.
NEWS
Lesley Mason | Kids Ink | February 17, 2011
February is Black History Month. Take this time to read books about lesser-known individuals that made an impact on our history. "Bad Boy: A Memoir," by Walter Dean Myers (Ages 12 and older) Although born in Martinsburg, W.Va., Myers acturally grew up in Harlem in the 1940s. The title follows his life as he drops out of high school and joins the Army. Though never a great student, Myers never gives up on his writing and goes on to win the Coretta Scott King Award for African American authors five times and was the first winner of the Michael L. Printz Award.
NEWS
June 2, 2005
Thursday, June 2 9 p.m. on NBC "Hit Me Baby One More Time" Its fitting that this show is part of NBC's summer season (everyone's at the beach) lineup. The program mines the dustbins of pop stardom for a worthy has-been who then performs his or her old hit and something currently on the airwaves. Viewers are the judge, jury and hopefully executioner. 11 p.m. on Bravo "Dan Finnerty & the Dan Band: I am Woman" For something completely different, check out L.A.'s Dan band as it performs its comedy song and dance routine to some of pop music's classics.
NEWS
March 2, 2008
In commemoration of Black History Month, Candace Bryd, activities director from San Mar Children's Home, coordinated a field trip through Washington County providing students the opportunity to visit historic significant sites of the African-American community. Their tour started in Funkstown at the Chaney House and led students through historic downtown Hagerstown to Asbury United Methodist Church, the oldest African-American church in Hagerstown and Municipal Stadium where Willie Mays played his first professional baseball game in 1950.
NEWS
June 20, 2011
Washington County Free Library will welcome author Christopher Webber to the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts on Thursday, July 14, at 7 p.m. as part of a fundraising event benefiting the library’s Western Maryland Room and the museum’s children’s educational programs. Webber is the author of the newly released book “American to the Backbone: The Life of James W.C. Pennington. The Fugitive Slave Who Became One of the First Black Abolitionists.” Tickets cost $25. Tickets can be purchased through the link on the library website at www.washcolibrary.org or by calling 301-739-3250, ext. 128. Tickets can also be purchased at the door.
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