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Skin Cancer

NEWS
June 9, 2008
Cancer prevention program series CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -Chambersburg YMCA will host the following programs Pennsylvania Cancer Education Network programs: · Thursday, June 12 - Prostate and ovarian cancer · Thursday, June 19 -Colorectal cancer · Thursday, June 26 - Skin cancer Sessions will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the convocation room at the Chambersburg YMCA, 570 E. McKinley St. For more information or...
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NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | June 21, 2004
andrear@herald-mail.com "As skin doctors, we want to foster the idea that you don't have to have a tan to look healthy," Hagerstown-based dermatologist James A. Schiro said. Yet individuals who crave that bronze glow can get it safely from a bottle or an airbrush - rather than from harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays produced by the sun and such artificial sources as tanning beds and sunlamps. The vast majority of skin cancers are due to unprotected UV exposure, according to information from the American Cancer Society at www.cancer.
NEWS
September 7, 2000
Middle-age tests: Cancer screenings Breast cancer American Cancer Society estimates there will be 182,800 new cases and 40,800 deaths from breast cancer in 2000. Mammograms have been credited with early detection of more breast cancer and reducing the number of deaths from the disease. There is debate and some controversy about when women should begin having mammograms. American Cancer Society recommends women begin annual mammograms at 40. American Medical Association recommends the screening for women ages 40 to 49 every one to two years and once a year after age 50. U.S. Clinical Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual mammograms at age 50. Talk to your doctor about screenings earlier if your family history warrants it. There is little disagreement, however, that all women - American Cancer Society sets the starting line at age 20 - should do monthly self-examination of their breasts and have their breasts examined every three years by a health-care provider.
NEWS
March 8, 2009
B. Sassy Inc. B. Sassy Inc. recently donated $100 to the Humane Society of Washington County from the sale of its Cuddly Companion products. Business owners Barbara Tritle and Carolyn Bishop will continue to donate $5 from the sale of every such product to the Humane Society. Items in the Cuddly Companion line include fleece dog coats, fleece-lined dog slickers, fleece people scarves and custom-designed handbags. All of the items are handmade and one of a kind. The items are available at the B. Sassy kiosk at the Saturday Farmer's Market in Hagerstown and at Bikle's Ski Shop at 7 N. Potomac St. in Hagerstown.
NEWS
May 8, 2007
Southeastern Senior Site Martha Drennen, manager Mount Vernon Road Keedysville 301-432-5624 Open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Today - Crafts with Amy Turner, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday - Bingo, 10:15 a.m. Thursday - Beanbag toss, 10:15 a.m. Friday - Horseshoes, 10:15 a.m. May 14 - "Sun Protection and Skin Cancer" with Ita Kavanagh, 10 a.m.; cards, 1 p.m. May 15 - "Take a Vacation in your own Backyard" and...
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | September 30, 2002
Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in women. Breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in women and second leading cause of death due to cancer. This year, an estimated 205,000 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed, and there will be 40,000 deaths. But more than twice as many women die from heart disease and stroke than from all forms of cancer including breast cancer.
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | March 4, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - When Charles Robert "Bob" Hornbecker graduated in 1972 from Towson State College, the North Hagerstown High graduate thought it would be great to teach at his alma mater. There were no openings there, but he was chosen from six applicants to fill a midyear opening at South Hagerstown High. That was 36 years ago, and Hornbecker said he hasn't looked back. He has the longest tenure of any teacher at South High. "I guess it's a bragging point, I don't know. I guess it means you're old," Hornbecker said with a laugh.
NEWS
By DR. TANIA CRUSSIAH / Special to The Herald-Mail | June 7, 2010
With the summer fast approaching, many people are already making plans for fun in the sun. While outings to the beach or the park are certainly enjoyable, it is important that people are aware of the danger the sun can cause to the skin. The ultraviolet rays emitted by the sun can cause a number of serious health problems ranging from mild sunburn to skin cancer. Here are several simple steps you can take to maintain your skin's health this summer. Know your skin. It is important that you are well aware of your own risk factors for skin health.
NEWS
September 21, 2006
Clear Spring Girls Soccer Senior How difficult is it for you to balance athletics with youracademic requirements? "Not hard, you just have to study and stick with your academics. " Who has had the biggest influence on your life? "My mom. I try to take after her. Both my parents have taught me to have a hard work ethic. I look up to my mother because she does a lot for my brother and I, and really holds us together. " Where is your favorite place to hang out?
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | May 30, 2011
You don't die from skin cancer. That's what Robert Harsh thought when he was diagnosed with the disease about four years ago. You go to a doctor, have the lesion removed and life goes on. But there was more to the small spot on Harsh's cheek than met the eye. It was melanoma. For several months, Harsh would look in the mirror and see something resembling a pimple. It wasn't dark, it didn't change shapes. But it wouldn't heal. Harsh is a flight paramedic with the Maryland State Police and volunteered for years with the Williamsport Ambulance Co. But even with his medical training, "I didn't have a clue what it was," he said.
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