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Sinkhole

NEWS
by JOSHUA BOWMAN | July 18, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - A section of Maugans Avenue plagued by sinkholes got some long-term relief on Tuesday. The Washington County Commissioners approved a contract to pump grout into an area along Maugans Avenue in front of Maugans Avenue Car Wash, where two sinkholes have appeared in the past year. The grout will stabilize the area and help prevent new sinkholes, said Terry McGee, chief engineer for Washington County. "We think the two sinkholes are related to larger instability issues here," McGee said.
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NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | July 17, 2007
A section of Maugans Avenue plagued by sinkholes got some long-term relief on Tuesday. The Washington County Commissioners approved a contract to pump grout into an area along Maugans Avenue in front of the Maugans Avenue Car Wash, where two sinkholes have been seen in the past year. The grout will stabilize the area and help prevent new sinkholes, said Terry McGee, chief engineer for Washington County. "We think the two sinkholes are related to larger instability issues here," McGee said.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | June 6, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - To stabilize the ground under Maugans Avenue before a sinkhole strikes again, Washington County probably will spend $200,000 to $250,000, Public Works Director Joseph Kroboth III said Tuesday. This will delay an already late road project another 30 to 60 days, he said. After the third sinkhole opened in that area in about a year, a state geologist recommended that the county fill subsurface caverns with pressurized grout, Kroboth said. Kroboth estimated the cost of fixing a large sinkhole on May 14 at $46,000, not including the contractor's cost of labor, which hadn't been submitted yet. He said the sinkhole problems need to be corrected before the $7.4 million road-widening project can continue.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 15, 2007
MAUGANSVILLE - A fist-sized puncture in the shoulder of Maugans Avenue on Sunday night grew overnight into a gaping hole. Beneath the street's surface, where water eroded the limestone, the chasm was greater. Joseph Kroboth III, the county's public works director, said the sinkhole was about 20 feet at a narrow point and about 30 feet at its widest. The depth varied from about 22 feet to more than 30 feet, he said. County officials said they expected to plug both the hole and the underground caverns that jutted out like wings by the end of Monday night.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | April 25, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - How much difference can 6 inches of earth make? Plenty, if it's on a football field where teens in cleats are trying to keep their footing. Early last week, a sinkhole was discovered near the 5-yard line on the left side of the field at the new Mike Callas Stadium at North Hagerstown High School. The depression was about 6 inches deep, according to Rob Rollins, acting director of facilities planning and development for Washington County Public Schools. He said the contractor, Specialty Surfaces of Wayne, Pa., arrived Friday to fill the sinkhole.
NEWS
By TAMELA BAKER | April 24, 2007
HAGERSTOWN How much difference can 6 inches of earth make? Plenty, if it's on a football field where teens in cleats are trying to keep their footing. Early last week, a sinkhole was discovered near the 5-yard line on the left side of the field at the new Mike Callas Stadium at North Hagerstown High School. The depression was about 6 inches deep, according to Rob Rollins, acting director of facilities planning and development for Washington County Public Schools. He said the contractor, Specialty Surfaces of Wayne, Pa., arrived Friday to fill the sinkhole.
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | March 16, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - The Berkeley County Commission is set to close on its purchase of a vacant shopping plaza by early June, but commissioners on Thursday hired an engineering firm to investigate a sinkhole in the parking lot of the property before signing off on the $3.15 million purchase price. The county's building commission is expected to give final approval to a contract to purchase the 5.51-acre property in the 500 block of South Raleigh Street on Monday, County Administrator Deborah Hammond said.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | September 26, 2003
FREDERICK, Md. - A large sinkhole along Interstate 70 in Frederick County, Md., has been stabilized, the Maryland State Highway Administration said Thursday. After Tuesday's heavy rains, the sinkhole formed a crater three stories deep and long enough to fit nearly three school buses end to end near the South Street exit of I-70 and Reichs Ford Road. About 2,500 cubic yards of backfill and crushed stone were dumped into the hole, which measured about 100 feet long, 55 feet wide and 35 feet deep, said State Highway Administration spokesman Charles Gischlar.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | September 24, 2003
martinsburg@herald-mail.com It opened up a couple of weeks ago and has been eating truckload after truckload of gravel since then. Residents nearby are worried about what dangers lie within the 130-foot-deep sinkhole off Hack Wilson Way. Pat Arnold, a substitute teacher who lives in one of the two dozen townhouses around the sinkhole, said he worries about the hole because of all the children in the neighborhood. They skateboard and play basketball in a parking lot adjacent to the hole, which Arnold estimates is no more than 10 or 15 feet across.
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