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Shenandoah River

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LIFESTYLE
January 20, 2012
 The Potomac River Audubon Society will sponsor a birding trip to various Shenandoah River sites in Jefferson County on Wednesday, Feb. 8. The trip is free and no registration is required. Anyone with an interest is welcome to come along, regardless of their birding skills, and children will be welcome. The trip will last about three hours. It will mostly involve driving from place to place by car, with little walking. It will focus on ducks, grebes, gull, terns, and any other birds encountered.
NEWS
August 1, 2011
A woman was found dead in the Shenandoah River near Harpers Ferry, W.Va., Sunday after she apparently committed suicide by jumping from the U.S. 340 bridge over the Shenandoah, Harpers Ferry Police Chief John Brown said. Police received a call at about 9 p.m. to check the woman's welfare after her vehicle was found parked along Shenandoah Street at a river access point near the bridge, Brown said. Police and firefighters from the Independent Fire Co. and Friendship Fire Co. searched for the woman and recovered her body from the river, Brown said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | July 5, 2013
The body of a Winchester, Va., man who drowned Thursday in the Shenandoah River was found Friday afternoon after an extensive search by personnel from four states, police said. Josue Menendez, 30, was found about 120 feet from the river bank at the Shannondale Springs public access area, where friends and family members had gathered Thursday, Jefferson County Sheriff Pete Dougherty said. The cause of death was determined to be accidental drowning, according to Jefferson County Medical Examiner Donald Shirley.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | June 18, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - A man who slipped on a rock after getting out of his inner tube on the Shenandoah River had to be rescued Friday afternoon because he was injured too badly to swim, a rescue official said. Independent Fire Co. Chief Ed Smith said the man was taken to Jefferson Memorial Hospital in Ranson, W.Va., for a possible hip injury. Smith did not know the man's name or hometown, but said he was 34 years old. Rescue officials were called to the river at 11:50 a.m., near the dam and power plant substation in Millville, W.Va.
NEWS
by RIC DUGAN / Staff Photographer | June 27, 2006
A group of rafters paddles through the rapids on the Shenandoah River near Harpers Ferry. W.Va., Monday afternoon.
NEWS
by RIC DUGAN / Staff Photographer | January 3, 2007
A kayaker maneuvers his way through the rapids on the Shenandoah River near Harpers Ferry, W.Va., on Tuesday afternoon.
NEWS
by Kelly Hahn Johnson/Staff Photographer | June 5, 2007
River guide Grant Douglas of River Riders, left, holds the raft for Gilman Middle School students to board as the seventh-grade class from Baltimore begins a rafting trip on the Shenandoah River in Harpers Ferry, W.Va. The group is among 66,000 people who go down the river each year, according to River Riders management.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | November 24, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Despite searches of the Shenandoah River by experienced kayakers over the weekend, no one has been able to find a young man whose kayak overturned in the Shenandoah River on Friday afternoon. About 11 kayakers have plied through the high water on the Shenandoah River looking for the man, West Virginia Department of Natural Resources officer K.E. White said Sunday afternoon. Seven kayakers searched the river Saturday and four searched the river Sunday, White said.
NEWS
January 23, 1998
Maryland Natural Resources Police officials Friday warned against boating and other recreational uses of the Upper Potomac River watershed. Due to recent rainfall, river levels remain hazardous for recreational use along the main stem and the lower main stem Potomac River and at Millville on the Shenandoah River. The advisory will remain in effect at least through Monday. For more information on Potomac River conditions, call the National Weather Service at 1-703-260-0305.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | July 5, 2013
The body of a Winchester, Va., man who drowned Thursday in the Shenandoah River was found Friday afternoon after an extensive search by personnel from four states, police said. Josue Menendez, 30, was found about 120 feet from the river bank at the Shannondale Springs public access area, where friends and family members had gathered Thursday, Jefferson County Sheriff Pete Dougherty said. The cause of death was determined to be accidental drowning, according to Jefferson County Medical Examiner Donald Shirley.
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LIFESTYLE
January 20, 2012
 The Potomac River Audubon Society will sponsor a birding trip to various Shenandoah River sites in Jefferson County on Wednesday, Feb. 8. The trip is free and no registration is required. Anyone with an interest is welcome to come along, regardless of their birding skills, and children will be welcome. The trip will last about three hours. It will mostly involve driving from place to place by car, with little walking. It will focus on ducks, grebes, gull, terns, and any other birds encountered.
NEWS
August 1, 2011
A woman was found dead in the Shenandoah River near Harpers Ferry, W.Va., Sunday after she apparently committed suicide by jumping from the U.S. 340 bridge over the Shenandoah, Harpers Ferry Police Chief John Brown said. Police received a call at about 9 p.m. to check the woman's welfare after her vehicle was found parked along Shenandoah Street at a river access point near the bridge, Brown said. Police and firefighters from the Independent Fire Co. and Friendship Fire Co. searched for the woman and recovered her body from the river, Brown said.
NEWS
July 1, 2011
The Potomac Valley Audubon Society is sponsoring a birding trip to various Shenandoah River sites in Jefferson County on Wednesday, July 13. This trip will offer good opportunities to see great blue herons, great egrets, bald eagles, Baltimore and orchard orioles and several warbler species. The trip will mostly involve driving from place to place by car, with not much walking. The trip is free and open to the public. The trip will begin at 6:30 a.m.; advanced registration is required.
BREAKINGNEWS
May 19, 2011
A search for someone who might have been in danger in the Potomac River was called off Thursday afternoon when a group of kayakers was found to be OK, a Washington County emergency dispatcher said. A report came in at about 3:30 p.m. that someone might have been stranded in a kayak or small raft in the river near Sandy Hook Road. Emergency crews used rescue boats to search the river where it meets the Shenandoah River, near Harpers Ferry, W.Va. However, shortly after 5 p.m., the rescue effort ended when everyone that was part of a group of kayakers was accounted for. A dispatcher said the kayakers had been in the water earlier and someone reported that someone might have been in danger, but the concern turned out to be unfounded.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS and DAVE McMILLION | June 22, 2009
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- A dozen people, most of them children, were rescued by state police helicopters Sunday night after they became stranded in a rocky section of the Shenandoah River near Harpers Ferry during a river rafting and tubing trip, Maryland State Police said Monday in a news release. The stranded victims included 10 children and two adults, ranging in age from 4 to 41 years old, state police said. There were no injuries, but after being stranded in the water after dark in windy conditions, many of the rafters were in the early stages of hypothermia, said Ed Smith, chief of Independent Fire Co. in Jefferson County, W.Va.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | September 19, 2008
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- It wasn't your average Amtrak train arrival. An energized crowd waited Thursday morning, as the "Good Morning America" crew arrived at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. Fans filled the lower town area to see the anchors at work on the daily television show. The visit by the ABC team was part of the show's broadcast of the "50 States in 50 Days" whistle-stop train tour leading to the general election. The "Good Morning America" team was in Ohio on Wednesday and was heading to Washington, D.C., after the Harpers Ferry appearance, according to the show's Web site.
NEWS
June 9, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - A six-year-old Ranson, W.Va., boy who went under water for about four minutes while swimming on the Shenandoah River near Shannondale Sunday died Sunday night, a state Division of Natural Resources official said. The boy died at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., about 11 p.m., Sunday, said DNR officer Ken White. The boy was flown to the hospital from Jefferson Memorial Hospital following the accident, officials said. It appears the boy died from drowning but an autopsy will be conducted by a medical examiner in Washington, D.C., to determine the cause of death, White said.
NEWS
May 3, 2008
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- A teenage boy who wrecked a Sea-Doo watercraft Saturday night in the Shenandoah River in Jefferson County was about 50 yards from being washed over Millville Dam when he was pulled to safety, Independent Fire Co. Chief Ed Smith said. Found clinging to a warning buoy for the dam and the watercraft, the boy was spotted in the river shortly before emergency officials were alerted at 7:23 p.m., Smith said. The boy was taken ashore by members of the department's Swift Water Rescue Team and taken to Jefferson Memorial Hospital in Ranson, W.Va.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | October 5, 2007
HARPERS FERRY, W.VA. - Complaints from motorists about a U.S. 340 road construction project in Jefferson County have prompted the West Virginia Division of Highways to revise the hired contractors' overnight work schedule and projected completion date. Robert "Bob" Amtower, engineer with DOH District 5, said the state has encouraged W-L Construction & Paving Inc. to stop work on the highway near Harpers Ferry about an hour or two earlier than originally planned because of "tremendous" morning congestion caused by the project.
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