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Shelf Life

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NEWS
July 20, 1999
Q. Does beer lose its flavor when it gets warm? Seems like cold beer allowed to warm, even if it's cooled again, tastes funny. This seems especially true of better quality beers. Is there an explanation? A. "Beer flavor is very much a temperature thing," says Tim Keck, head brewer at Frederick Brewing Company in Frederick, Md. When beer is very cold, the bitterness of the hops is accentuated, but as it gets closer to room temperature, the sweetness of the malt is more dominant, Keck says.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | September 15, 2004
andrear@herald-mail.com Food that is properly handled and stored at zero degrees or colder will remain safe during a lengthy time in the freezer - but its quality will deteriorate as time passes. "People think you can freeze indefinitely. That's a fallacy," said Judy Stains, culinary arts instructor at the James Rumsey Technical Institute in Martinsburg, W.Va. Exceeding recommended guidelines for frozen food shelf life can affect tenderness, flavor, smell, juiciness and color, according to information from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition at www.csfan.
OPINION
February 13, 2013
I thought maybe, just maybe, I would make it through my entire journalistic career without having to spell the word “Fastnacht.” But apparently this is not to be the case, and I blame social media. Anyone who tells you that nothing good ever happens in an alley late at night has never been to Hagerstown. Along with thousands of others, I've spent the odd late-night hours out in back of Krumpe's Do-Nut shop waiting for a fresh-fried dozen. At least I did prior to age 40, at which point staying up past 11 p.m. would wipe me out for three consecutive days.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | July 16, 2008
The price per gallon for gasoline makes the headlines daily. Food costs at the grocery store are getting attention as well, with reporters talking about the parallel rise in the cost of gas and milk in the same sentence. The Department of Agriculture is predicting a 4- to 5-percent rise in food prices this year. Now consumers are searching out bargains at the grocery store, an about-face from the previous norm of relying on convenience foods. Despite rising prices, you can trim food costs and still eat well.
NEWS
July 7, 1999
By MEG H. PARTINGTON / Staff Writer photo: JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer Playwright Wendy MacLeod strives to change the way people think. [cont. from lifestyle ] The author of "The Water Children," one of four plays being produced at the 1999 Contemporary American Theater Festival in Shepherdstown, W.Va., she says her goal is to "invert the expected thinking of things" and challenge presumptions. "I'm trying to get people to stop thinking in sort of black-and-white ways," says MacLeod in a phone interview from Los Angeles.
NEWS
By SUE STOCK | July 22, 2007
RALEIGH, N.C. - Milk is $4 a gallon. Cereal is $4 a box. An orange for your lunchbox can run $1.50 or more. Food prices are rising faster than they have in 17 years, and there's no relief in sight. Economists had expected a 4 percent increase this year - we reached that in May. No one is predicting prices that will make you hit the panic button. But when you add the higher grocery bill to everything else that costs more - gas, utilities and medical care - it's an unwelcome change for most families.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | April 10, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com About 300,000 members of the U.S. military are far from home - and home cooking - in Operation Iraqi Freedom. They have to eat safe food. Feeding so many people, under less-than-convenient circumstances, is a daunting prospect. "It's a very fluid situation," says Frank Johnson, director of Public Affairs, Defense Supply Center in Philadelphia. Johnson's agency is responsible for contracting for the food needed by troops. The center also takes care of getting clothes - from underwear to chemical protective suits - and medical supplies from aspirin to camouflage bandages.
NEWS
April 19, 2000
Last week Fox Television interrupted "The Simpsons" three times for a "Special Report" to show a helicopter shot of Janet Reno's black sport utility vehicle driving down the highway. My first thought was oh no, A.C. Cowlings is behind the wheel and the attorney general must have slit somebody's throat and now has a gun to her head. But no. She was just on her way to somebody's house to speak to somebody about the little Elian Gonzalez. This was news? I'd managed to escape Elianmania up until that point, but when they cut into the "Who Shot Mr. Burns" episode, Part I, that makes it personal.
NEWS
April 17, 2008
Why arrest people for removing food from a dumpster? To the editor: What ever happened to "waste not, want not," or the adage "Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without" that we grew up with during the 1940s and '50s? Everything in our society involving human beings, from our politics, health care, food distribution, relation to our life support environment, cabin of space ship earth if you will, has become so broken I wonder how long it will take to get the message through to the people making our country's legal, economic and business decisions.
SPORTS
By BOB PARASILITI | January 13, 2013
Reality is all the rage these days. It seems that most everyone wants to “keep it real,” … maybe that's how we arrived at the concept of reality TV. Be it a creation of society's lack of creativity or a “you can't make this stuff up” attitude, just plopping a camera in a room full of people is all the entertainment most people seem to need these days. Outside of television, we have one other place where you can find drama, comedy, challenge, anxiety, trepidation, amazing real-life characters and the “man vs. whatever” situations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 13, 2013
I thought maybe, just maybe, I would make it through my entire journalistic career without having to spell the word “Fastnacht.” But apparently this is not to be the case, and I blame social media. Anyone who tells you that nothing good ever happens in an alley late at night has never been to Hagerstown. Along with thousands of others, I've spent the odd late-night hours out in back of Krumpe's Do-Nut shop waiting for a fresh-fried dozen. At least I did prior to age 40, at which point staying up past 11 p.m. would wipe me out for three consecutive days.
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SPORTS
By BOB PARASILITI | January 13, 2013
Reality is all the rage these days. It seems that most everyone wants to “keep it real,” … maybe that's how we arrived at the concept of reality TV. Be it a creation of society's lack of creativity or a “you can't make this stuff up” attitude, just plopping a camera in a room full of people is all the entertainment most people seem to need these days. Outside of television, we have one other place where you can find drama, comedy, challenge, anxiety, trepidation, amazing real-life characters and the “man vs. whatever” situations.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | July 16, 2008
The price per gallon for gasoline makes the headlines daily. Food costs at the grocery store are getting attention as well, with reporters talking about the parallel rise in the cost of gas and milk in the same sentence. The Department of Agriculture is predicting a 4- to 5-percent rise in food prices this year. Now consumers are searching out bargains at the grocery store, an about-face from the previous norm of relying on convenience foods. Despite rising prices, you can trim food costs and still eat well.
NEWS
April 17, 2008
Why arrest people for removing food from a dumpster? To the editor: What ever happened to "waste not, want not," or the adage "Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without" that we grew up with during the 1940s and '50s? Everything in our society involving human beings, from our politics, health care, food distribution, relation to our life support environment, cabin of space ship earth if you will, has become so broken I wonder how long it will take to get the message through to the people making our country's legal, economic and business decisions.
NEWS
By SUE STOCK | July 22, 2007
RALEIGH, N.C. - Milk is $4 a gallon. Cereal is $4 a box. An orange for your lunchbox can run $1.50 or more. Food prices are rising faster than they have in 17 years, and there's no relief in sight. Economists had expected a 4 percent increase this year - we reached that in May. No one is predicting prices that will make you hit the panic button. But when you add the higher grocery bill to everything else that costs more - gas, utilities and medical care - it's an unwelcome change for most families.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | September 15, 2004
andrear@herald-mail.com Food that is properly handled and stored at zero degrees or colder will remain safe during a lengthy time in the freezer - but its quality will deteriorate as time passes. "People think you can freeze indefinitely. That's a fallacy," said Judy Stains, culinary arts instructor at the James Rumsey Technical Institute in Martinsburg, W.Va. Exceeding recommended guidelines for frozen food shelf life can affect tenderness, flavor, smell, juiciness and color, according to information from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition at www.csfan.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | April 10, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com About 300,000 members of the U.S. military are far from home - and home cooking - in Operation Iraqi Freedom. They have to eat safe food. Feeding so many people, under less-than-convenient circumstances, is a daunting prospect. "It's a very fluid situation," says Frank Johnson, director of Public Affairs, Defense Supply Center in Philadelphia. Johnson's agency is responsible for contracting for the food needed by troops. The center also takes care of getting clothes - from underwear to chemical protective suits - and medical supplies from aspirin to camouflage bandages.
NEWS
April 19, 2000
Last week Fox Television interrupted "The Simpsons" three times for a "Special Report" to show a helicopter shot of Janet Reno's black sport utility vehicle driving down the highway. My first thought was oh no, A.C. Cowlings is behind the wheel and the attorney general must have slit somebody's throat and now has a gun to her head. But no. She was just on her way to somebody's house to speak to somebody about the little Elian Gonzalez. This was news? I'd managed to escape Elianmania up until that point, but when they cut into the "Who Shot Mr. Burns" episode, Part I, that makes it personal.
NEWS
July 20, 1999
Q. Does beer lose its flavor when it gets warm? Seems like cold beer allowed to warm, even if it's cooled again, tastes funny. This seems especially true of better quality beers. Is there an explanation? A. "Beer flavor is very much a temperature thing," says Tim Keck, head brewer at Frederick Brewing Company in Frederick, Md. When beer is very cold, the bitterness of the hops is accentuated, but as it gets closer to room temperature, the sweetness of the malt is more dominant, Keck says.
NEWS
July 7, 1999
By MEG H. PARTINGTON / Staff Writer photo: JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer Playwright Wendy MacLeod strives to change the way people think. [cont. from lifestyle ] The author of "The Water Children," one of four plays being produced at the 1999 Contemporary American Theater Festival in Shepherdstown, W.Va., she says her goal is to "invert the expected thinking of things" and challenge presumptions. "I'm trying to get people to stop thinking in sort of black-and-white ways," says MacLeod in a phone interview from Los Angeles.
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