Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsSewage
IN THE NEWS

Sewage

NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | August 28, 2004
Water quality warnings on Antietam Creek were lifted Friday, two weeks after the City of Hagerstown's sewage treatment plant spilled water that had not been completely treated. City Water and Sewer Department Manager David Shindle said he received clearance from the Washington County Health Department Friday morning to lift the three dozen posted signs, which were placed along the creek between Potomac River and the Frederick Street plant. Wastewater treated at the plant goes into the creek.
Advertisement
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | August 15, 2004
julieg@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - The day after the City of Hagerstown's latest spill of partially treated sewage into Antietam Creek, Mayor William M. Breichner and three City Council members said fixing the situation is their top priority. Councilman Lewis Metzner wants citizens to know: "Money is not an issue. Overflows into Antietam Creek are not acceptable. " Up to 4 million gallons of wastewater that had not been disinfected were dumped into Antietam Creek on Friday after electrical equipment failed, city officials said.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | August 5, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Efforts to notify the public after a local waterway becomes polluted by man-made problems can take hours to reach the intended audience, and sometimes longer. "There's just simply a time lag that's inherent in the process," said Rod MacRae, spokesman for the Washington County Health Department. On Sunday, the City of Hagerstown's Waste Water Treatment Plant released into Antietam Creek 2.7 million gallons of water that had not been disinfected during the sewage treatment process.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | August 3, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - Health officials said they would continue to prohibit swimming in Antietam Creek today and would discourage other creek uses, two days after partially treated sewage was released into the creek. The City of Hagerstown Waste Water Treatment Plant off Frederick Street suffered a power outage Sunday between 6:20 a.m. and 11:40 a.m., releasing approximately 2.7 million gallons of water that had not been treated to kill bacteria, said City Water and Sewer Department Manager David Shindle.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | June 16, 2004
People should avoid recreational use of parts of Antietam Creek after some partially treated waste water was released from the Hagerstown Waste Water Treatment Plant this week, according to a press release from the Washington County Health Department. A storm-related power outage caused about 1.2 million gallons of diluted, partially treated waste water to be released into the creek early Tuesday, officials said. That followed the release of 18,600 gallons Monday afternoon due to heavy rains.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | June 2, 2004
Utility work starting on Eastern Boulevard Utility installation along Eastern Boulevard at Opal Court in Hagerstown will begin tonight, causing some traffic inconveniences, according to a news release from the Hagerstown Engineering Department. The work will include street digging and installation of sewage pipes, officials said. Work will be done daily between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. until it is complete. Officials said the contractor is expected to finish Saturday, but the work could continue through next week if problems arise.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | May 13, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com If state environmental officials adopt a formula proposed by Hagerstown to determine its sewage treatment capacity, a potential state-imposed moratorium on new sewage connections and building permits in the city next spring could be averted. A moratorium could delay new home building, City Water and Sewer Department Manager David Shindle said last week. The City Council last week authorized Shindle to pursue the new formula with the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | July 23, 2003
An employee of the Washington County Department of Water Quality was treated at Washington County Hospital and released Tuesday after he fell about 3 feet into a channel of treated sewage, the department's director said. The man was cleaning the ultraviolet tubes from the Conococheague Wastewater Treatment Plant at 16232 Elliott Parkway when he slipped into the effluent channel, which empties into the Conococheague Creek, Director Greg Murray said. The employee, who Murray refused to identify because of an employee privacy policy, scraped his shin and side as he fell into the concrete channel, Murray said.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | January 30, 2003
Pretreated sewage overflowed from the Conococheague Waste Water Treatment Plant Wednesday morning and spilled into a tributary of Conococheague Creek, said Laurie Bucher, director of environmental health for the Washington County Health Department. Bucher said the overflow was minor and that fewer than 1,000 gallons of foamy sludge worked its way into an unnamed stream behind the plant. The overflow happened from 5:30 to 7:30 a.m. She said crews posted signs along the streams and notified nearby residents of the overflow, but that the spill wasn't expected to cause any problems.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | October 10, 2002
CLEAR SPRING - A small sewage spill discovered Monday in Tom's Run, a stream that runs through Clear Spring, posed no danger to residents downstream, Washington County Health Department officials said Wednesday. "The stream was checked a distance from the spill and we saw minnows swimming in the water," said Laurie Bucher, health department director of environmental health. She estimated fewer than three gallons of sewage made it into the stream. She said no public warning was necessary in this case.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|