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NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | March 24, 2007
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA.-Seven people were taken to the hospital on Friday after an attempt to clean up an overflow of sewage at the Wal-Mart Supercenter near Charles Town went awry, prompting the store to be evacuated and closed for about two hours, officials said. Firefighters and EMS personnel responded to the store at 96 Patrick Henry Way at 1:50 p.m. after they received a report of a store employee with respiratory problems, Independent Fire Co. Chief Ed Smith said. Following protocol, the store was evacuated after emergency officials arrived, Smith said.
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NEWS
by DON AINES | July 26, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Quincy Township is applying to the state for $400,000 to reduce the nitrate and sediments in the effluent from its Nunnery Road sewage treatment plant. The Franklin County Board of Commissioners Tuesday approved an application to the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development for funding through the competitive Community Development Block Grant program. The total project cost for the redesign and reconfiguration of the plant is approximately $650,000, said Supervisor Bob Gunder.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | April 19, 2006
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Officials with a sewage treatment facility in Washington, D.C., have considered disposing some of the plant's waste on a field in Jefferson County, but a contractor working on the project backed off the idea after deciding West Virginia's regulations were too restrictive, an official with the facility said Tuesday. Officials with the contractor are "collecting their thoughts" about the proposal and it still might be considered, said Chris Peot, an engineer with the Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant in Washington, D.C. After Jefferson County Commission members heard about the proposal, they were concerned how the operation could affect the county's environment, particularly the county's groundwater.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | April 13, 2006
HANCOCK- The odor in the alley brought back memories for Jim True, but not in a good way. "I could smell the sewage," True said to town officials during Hancock's town council meeting Wednesday. "Then I saw flies buzzin' all around there. " True told council members that there was a manhole that repeatedly leaked raw sewage in the alley behind the four buildings he owns along Blue Hill Road, near Hancock Elementary School. After describing the most recent leak in February, True, 69, asked the town to fix the manhole.
NEWS
January 10, 2006
Flush tax won't solve bigger problems To the editor: Several Hagerstown officials have told me to keep quiet because I am not a city resident and don't pay city taxes. To them I say, stick it in your ear. I do pay city taxes in a round-about way. I am served by city water service that I pay a premium price for, due to where I live. I also am charged for sewage use which I don't have - I have a well-maintained septic system ... there is no way in the world that my septic system can have any affect on the sewage treatment facility, but I still must pay if I want water service.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | January 21, 2005
gregs@herald-mail.com Anthony "Tony" T. Campello, a Republican running for mayor of the City of Hagerstown, said a twist of fate three years ago helped bring him to the point of being a candidate. Campello, 35, was driving an 18-wheeler full time until he had a loading accident in 2002. In late 2003 - two knee surgeries later - he was told he would have to find another career. In 2004, Campello began taking computer classes at Hagerstown Community College. He also tutors there, works part time and is the honors society president.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | January 13, 2005
gregs@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - The Hagerstown City Council agreed Wednesday to pay $85,750 in fines, to set limits on development in and near the city and to speed up improvements to the city's sewer treatment system. The steps are the result of failures by the city sewage treatment plant's operation dating back five years, according to a legally binding document between the city and the Maryland Department of the Environment. Those failures last year drew the attention of state environment officials and a threat of a lawsuit by a Rockville, Md.-based environmental activist group.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | January 13, 2005
gregs@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - There is a new wrinkle to whether Washington County Hospital will be able to move to the site where hospital officials plan, city and county officials said Wednesday. Hagerstown city officials said Wednesday that under rules adopted Wednesday, the hospital would not be allowed to move to its proposed site near Robinwood Medical Center this year, but some decisions remain to be made that could allow the plans to move forward. The Hagerstown City Council on Wednesday voted to adopt a consent judgment - a legally binding document - that holds the city responsible for improving the city's Waste Water Treatment Plant on Frederick Street in an effort to reduce pollutants that have been spilled into Antietam Creek over the past five years.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | December 17, 2004
An agreement between the City of Hagerstown and the Maryland Department of the Environment over punishment and corrective measures for the city's sewer system problems has been delayed by a recent lawsuit threat, the mayor said. Mayor William M. Breichner said this week that a mid-November letter from Rockville, Md.-based environmental activist group Potomac Riverkeeper spurred the delay. According to the letter, the group said it would sue the city under the U.S. Clean Water Act if it did not correct within 60 days problems that led to several spills of raw sewage and partially treated wastewater over the past few years.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | November 24, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - A Rockville, Md., environmental activist group has begun the official process to sue the City of Hagerstown under federal laws governing water cleanliness. Lawyers for Rockville-based Potomac Riverkeeper said in a letter sent to the city Friday that the complaint stems from problems with the city's Waste Water Treatment Plant on Frederick Street. The group said it will sue the city within 60 days if several problems are not corrected by that time.
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