Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsSewage
IN THE NEWS

Sewage

NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | January 11, 2011
A Washington County pilot study of a wastewater treatment additive called BioMag has confirmed the magnetic mineral could save the county millions of dollars and inspired other jurisdictions to consider it as well, a county official reported Tuesday. The pilot study, which ran from July 2009 through June 2010, was conducted at the suggestion of the Maryland Department of the Environment, said Julie A. Pippel, director of the county Division of Environmental Management.  MDE officials had recently been introduced to the new technology and asked Washington County to study whether it could reduce the costs of upgrading wastewater treatment plants to comply with the state's new Enhanced Nutrient Removal standards, she said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | September 21, 2010
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- The Berkeley County Public Service Sewer District has been sued by property owners who say their home has been flooded with raw sewage four times since February 2008. Sewer district general counsel William F. Rohrbaugh said he was aware of the complaint filed in Berkeley County Circuit Clerk Virginia M. Sine's office on behalf of Dolly and Rex Fergus of 46 Larkspur Lane, but declined to comment other than to acknowledge the substance of the complaint. Rohrbaugh did say that the sewer district retained legal counsel to file a response to the suit.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | August 22, 2010
SMITHSBURG --State officials want towns to better plan how annexations are carried out and to more effectively plan for drinking water and sewage treatment needs. The initiatives stem from Gov. Martin O'Malley's "Smart, Green & Growing" efforts and are related to Chesapeake Bay pollution issues, said Jill Baker, a town planner for the town of Smithsburg. But in Smithsburg, town officials are complaining about the money that has to be spent to comply with the requirements and they question why they have to be dealt with now as they wrestle with other issues in the community.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | April 28, 2010
BOONSBORO -- Three Boonsboro residents who live along North Main Street have experienced raw sewage backing up into their homes, and town officials said an engineer's report traced a March 7 backup in two of the houses to a nearby Weis Markets store. Kevin Chambers, chairman of the Boonsboro Municipal Utilities Commission, said Tuesday that one of the residents experienced sewage backups four times, another resident experienced backups twice and a third resident experienced at least one backup.
NEWS
September 9, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- A worker was injured Wednesday afternoon when he fell about 17 feet into an empty tank under construction at the City of Hagerstown's wastewater treatment plant off Frederick Street, Hagerstown Fire Department Battalion 2 Chief Randy Myers said. The worker was helping build the concrete tank that will be used to treat sewage when he apparently fell off a ledge on the inside of the tank at about 3:30 p.m., Myers said. The worker appeared to have arm and shoulder injuries and was taken to Washington County Hospital, Myers said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | August 22, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- Substantially higher sewer bills might be on the horizon for many Eastern Panhandle residents because of mandated waste treatment standards aimed at cleaning up Chesapeake Bay. With no guarantee of federal or state money for facility upgrades in sight, at least two customer-supported sewage treatment systems in Berkeley and Jefferson counties are eyeing potentially large sewage rate increases. The tougher pollution standards, which include reduction of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients released into the bay's watershed, were set into motion by former West Virginia Gov. Bob Wise in June 2002.
NEWS
July 14, 2009
WILLIAMSPORT -- Williamsport Town Council members Monday night agreed to increase the town's sewer rates by 7 percent. Mayor James G. McCleaf II said previously that the town decided to go forward with the rate hike after Washington County, which processes the town's sewage, increased its processing charge to the town by 5 percent. The rate increase will raise the monthly sewer bill for a family of three to four people by about $5.50 a month, McCleaf has said.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | June 9, 2009
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- Chambersburg borough officials are looking into a proposal that might help the environment and save them more than $9 million. The borough council this week agreed to spend $15,000 on a study that will detail how nutrients can be removed from cow or swine manure. That study will be submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to find out whether a participating farm's efforts can earn "credits" for protecting the Chesapeake Bay. Council President William McLaughlin hopes the amount of those credits will be enough to keep the borough from having to expand its Hollywell Avenue sewage treatment plant as planned.
NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | January 8, 2009
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. -- The Warm Springs Public Service District's insurance company will pay for a Vernon Street family whose home was damaged by sewage to be housed at the Best Western through Jan. 16, homeowner Deborah Harris said. The family was helped initially by the American Red Cross. When the sewer department responded to a call Tuesday from Harris that raw sewage was gushing outside a blocked sewage pipe, department workers used 200 pounds of pressure to unclog it - a force that "flooded the home with sewage," Harris said.
NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | January 7, 2009
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - When a clogged sewage line was unclogged by pressure Tuesday, raw sewage was forced into the lines of a home at 17 Vernon St. When the Warm Springs Public Service District responded to a call Tuesday from homeowner Deborah Harris, who said raw sewage was gushing outside a blocked sewage pipe, department workers used 200 pounds of pressure to unclog it - a force that "flooded the home with sewage," Harris said. The sewage was forced into the bathroom toilet, sink and bathtub, and into the kitchen sink, which overflowed onto the floors, Harris said.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|