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NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | October 8, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com Waynesboro, Pa. - Township Administrator Michael Christopher told the Washington Township Supervisors Monday night that he was becoming concerned that some 200 property owners have yet to have their septic tanks cleaned out. The deadline for the cleaning is Dec. 31. The township has been under orders from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection to ensure that every private septic tank...
NEWS
April 8, 1997
By CLYDE FORD Staff Writer, Charles Town CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County needs a place to put waste pumped from homeowners' septic tanks so it can be partially treated before going to the Charles Town waste treatment plant, county Public Service District officials said Tuesday. Charles Town's waste treatment plant has not been able to accept waste from septic waste haulers for about two months, officials said. The waste from haulers is too toxic for the plant to handle, so the septic tank waste is hauled to a treatment facility in Winchester, Va., officials said.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | April 27, 2006
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - High levels of bacteria have been detected in Shepherdstown's Town Run, and the cause could be from a number of sources, including domestic animals or septic systems, a Shepherd University professor said Wednesday night. Town Run is a prominent feature of Shepherdstown and the surrounding area. It begins near Morgan's Grove Park, then flows through the park, a marsh and then into town, where it runs under buildings and past Shepherd University. People began noticing sediment buildup in Town Run, and last year, samples of water were taken from the stream, said Glenn Kinser, vice president of the Shepherdstown Men's Club.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | November 19, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - As the Eastern Panhandle grows, the changing landscape spreads over underground water supplies. In some cases, the growth pressure can have an impact on the water, which is used for drinking, officials say. On Thursday, more than 160 government officials and other professionals met near Shepherdstown to study ways to protect well water supplies. Development is occurring so fast in the Eastern Panhandle that officials are starting to see problems relating to water management, said Twila Carr, environmental resource specialist for the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
January 19, 2001
Antrim area wells contaminated By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer, Waynesboro GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Nitrates and bacteria are found in much of the groundwater under Antrim Township, water that moves freely and quickly through the porous limestone terrain common to the area, said the man who is responsible for checking the quality of the township's underground drinking water. Jon Piper, the sewage enforcement officer for Antrim and several surrounding townships, said the first line of defense in protecting the area's drinking water is the proper installation and operation of private septic systems.
NEWS
December 27, 2001
Township residents face deadline on tanks By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer, Waynesboro WAYNESBORO, Pa. - It's been more than three years since the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection issued regulations that force homeowners to pump out septic tanks every three years. Washington Township has nearly 1,000 homes, said Zoning Enforcement Officer Jerry Zeigler. The township was divided into three zones - east, west and middle. The supervisors began the pumping schedule in 1998 with the west zone.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE, Waynesboro | September 15, 1998
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Nearly 1,000 Washington Township residents with septic tanks will have to get them pumped out once every three years, under new regulations put in place this year, township officials said. Gerald Zeigler, township zoning code enforcement officer, said the state Department of Environmental Protection ordered the new regulations in March following the upgrade of the township's public sewer system. The township has the job of enforcing the new rules. "From an environmental standpoint the (state)
NEWS
December 10, 1997
Some Holiday Acres residents support sewers By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer Holiday Acres residents told horror stories Tuesday about their failed septic tanks and asked the Washington County Commissioners not to stop plans for public sewer there. "Some people put $7,000 in their yard and it's just gurgling right up above the grass," said Carol Ridenour, who lives on Holiday Drive. The County Commissioners are reviewing a 1993 decision to extend public sewer to 115 homes in the Smithsburg-area neighborhood.
NEWS
March 23, 2004
Editor's note - Please be as brief as possible when calling Mail Call, The Daily Mail's reader call-in line. Mail Call is not staffed on weekends or holidays so it is best to call Mail Call during the week. The Mail Call number is 301-791-6236. You are welcome to leave a recorded message on any subject, but some calls will be screened out. Here are some of the calls we have received lately: "I want to thank The Herald-Mail and anyone in the community who helped us find Snowball our cat. He was reported missing last week and he finally came home.
NEWS
March 3, 2001
Legislation aggravated well problem in Berkeley County By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A Berkeley County lawmaker and environmental officials disagree over whether a state law enacted two years ago may be contributing to well water contamination in the county. A report in December found 60 percent of wells tested in the county are contaminated with bacteria. A bill co-sponsored by Del. Larry Faircloth, R- Berkeley County, eased requirements for testing the ground before installing residential septic systems.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | February 8, 2013
Washington County lawmakers were briefed Wednesday on a plan to lessen nutrient discharges to the Chesapeake Bay. The targeted reductions in nitrogen and phosphorus discharges and sediments is expected to cost the county $1.1 billion through 2025, which is the date suggested by the Maryland Department of Environment for meeting the reduced levels. The nutrient reduction target amounts are set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The Washington County delegation meeting was attended by Robert Summers, secretary of the Maryland Department of Environment, Greg Murray, the county administrator, and Julie Pippel, director of Washington County's Division of Environmental Management.
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OPINION
January 11, 2013
The 2013 General Assembly began its three-month session this week, with local lawmakers preparing to play defense. On issues from the gas tax to septic tanks to gun control, Washington County's delegation says it wants to block what other parts of the state see as progress. We largely agree with these positions, and we count on lawmakers to hold the line in areas that would detrimentally affect people in rural counties. We join them in opposing a hike in the state gasoline tax on two grounds.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | February 13, 2011
There’s a very good argument for raising the tax on gasoline and a very good argument for banning construction of new septic systems. Excuse me for not making either of them. The best I can do is take a pass on the notion that the agenda of state, Baltimorecentric government is a full-blown attack on rural counties and country living. But it is difficult not to feel put upon when the lawmakers seem to treat Western Maryland as one big bed and breakfast, where people go to sip tea and enjoy the flowers — and where no one has to drive a healthy distance to work every day, or has to worry about a trifling little thing like housing costs.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | April 27, 2006
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - High levels of bacteria have been detected in Shepherdstown's Town Run, and the cause could be from a number of sources, including domestic animals or septic systems, a Shepherd University professor said Wednesday night. Town Run is a prominent feature of Shepherdstown and the surrounding area. It begins near Morgan's Grove Park, then flows through the park, a marsh and then into town, where it runs under buildings and past Shepherd University. People began noticing sediment buildup in Town Run, and last year, samples of water were taken from the stream, said Glenn Kinser, vice president of the Shepherdstown Men's Club.
NEWS
September 15, 2005
"My Hagerstown water bill has a flush tax of $7.50 every three months. When it's time to pump these septic tanks, are they going to help us pump them? It costs a good bit to have the septic tank pumped. Are the commissioners going to give us a refund on some of the money we pay to have our septic tanks pumped?" - Williamsport "On the History Channel, it was stated that before 2001, a survey was done on the levees around New Orleans, and it was found that they were in bad shape and would not withstand a Category 5 hurricane.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | November 19, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - As the Eastern Panhandle grows, the changing landscape spreads over underground water supplies. In some cases, the growth pressure can have an impact on the water, which is used for drinking, officials say. On Thursday, more than 160 government officials and other professionals met near Shepherdstown to study ways to protect well water supplies. Development is occurring so fast in the Eastern Panhandle that officials are starting to see problems relating to water management, said Twila Carr, environmental resource specialist for the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
by DON AINES | June 30, 2004
chambersburg@herald-mail.com Bowing to the wishes of property owners along South Main Street and Mill Road, the Chambersburg Borough Council voted Monday night to go ahead with a $705,000 sewer line extension, rather than a larger, more expensive project that could have also served an undeveloped portion of town. In December, Congressman Bill Shuster, R-9th, announced a $530,000 federal grant for the project, which would extend sewer service to 33 properties along South Main and Mill Road that have on-lot septic systems.
NEWS
April 8, 2004
laurae@herald-mail.com ANNAPOLIS - An attempt to exempt septic tank users from a $30-a-year sewer fee to help pay for Chesapeake Bay restoration failed in the Maryland Senate on Wednesday. Senate Republicans argued that septic users don't represent a large part of the pollution problem. They also said state officials don't know how they would collect the fee for septic users beginning July 1, 2005. Public sewer customers would see the fee on their bills as soon as July.
NEWS
March 30, 2004
Politics as usual To the editor: I am so disappointed with Del. Chris Shank. He was such a nice, sincere young man when he first ran for public office, campaigning door-to-door, explaining his philosophy. It appears that now he has been co-opted to vote along party lines rather than thinking of his constituents. In the March 20 Herald-Mail, in justifying his vote for the vehicle registration "fee" (tax?), he said "former Gov. Parris Glendening raided and looted the (transportation trust)
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