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Scripps National Spelling Bee

NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | May 28, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - As a sixth-grader, he was sick the day his class held a spelling bee. He didn't get to compete in seventh grade, either. But this year, as an eighth-grader, Damien Clipp participated in his first spelling bee and made it all the way to the national competition. He was confident competing against his classmates and students countywide. But the 14-year-old Hagerstown resident says he doesn't know how he'll fare Wednesday against the best spellers in the country.
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NEWS
by LISA PREJEAN | March 30, 2007
The first round of the Scripps National Spelling Bee has two parts: written and oral. The written part is described as "savage," by James Maguire in his book "American Bee: The National Spelling Bee and the Culture of Word Nerds. " (Perhaps the only thing nerdier than a word nerd is someone who likes to read about word nerds. I admit it. I'm reading the book.) In the written round, contestants are given a spelling test consisting of 25 words picked from anywhere in a specified unabridged dictionary.
NEWS
By TARA REILLY | March 25, 2007
Damien Clipp's "cachet" on Saturday was leaving Western Heights Middle School as Washington County's top eighth-grade speller. Damien, an E. Russell Hicks Middle School student, correctly spelled cachet in the eighth-grade competition of the 28th annual Washington County Spelling Bee on Saturday after going 10 rounds. By winning, he earned a trip to the 2007 Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C., on May 30 and 31. The Herald-Mail Co. sponsored the county spelling bee and is sending Damien and a parent to the national competition.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | March 25, 2007
HAGERSTOWN-Damien Clipp's "cachet" on Saturday was leaving Western Heights Middle School as Washington County's top eighth-grade speller. Damien, an E. Russell Hicks Middle School student, correctly spelled cachet in the eighth-grade competition of the 28th annual Washington County Spelling Bee on Saturday after going 10 rounds. By winning, he earned a trip to the 2007 Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C., on May 30 and 31. The Herald-Mail Co. sponsored the county spelling bee and is sending Damien and a parent to the national competition.
NEWS
June 15, 2006
Spelling bee was an experience I'll always remember To the editor: I would like to express my sincere thanks to Ms. Dee Stevenson and The Herald-Mail for sponsoring my trip to the 2006 Scripps National Spelling Bee. The bee greatly enhanced my knowledge and appreciation of the English language, and I thoroughly enjoyed meeting other spellers from across the United States and even other countries, as well as participating in the...
NEWS
May 31, 2006
Did you know that the word "agonal" means "of, relating to, or associated with agony and especially the death agony?" That's the definition on the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary. And, when confronted with such an unfamiliar word, most people would be able to look it up. Not the participants in the Scripps National Spelling Bee. They must spell each word from memory, or use their knowledge of language to puzzle out whatever odd word they've been assigned to spell. Anna Baldasarre, a 14-year-old Smithsburg Middle School student, won her trip to the national event, which begins today, by winning the Washington County bee in March.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | May 30, 2006
SMITHSBURG From aardvark to zyzzogeton, the words of Scripps National Spelling Bee's official dictionary could stump even the most-practiced participant. With 2,662 pages of words and definitions, Webster's Third New International Dictionary towered above several less-intimidating study guides spread before local speller Anna Baldasarre. More than a week before the bee - which begins Wednesday - Anna, 14, and her mother and sister, Laura, 15, said they have enjoyed preparing together.
NEWS
June 3, 2005
Today we applaud Steven Wolfe, a Grace Academy eighth grader, for making it through two rounds of the Scripps National Spelling Bee this week. To get that far by correctly spelling words that many people have never heard of is a great achievement indeed. Wolfe, 14, won the 26th Annual Washington County Spelling bee in March by spelling "synapse. " According to the judge's list, that word means "the locus at which the nervous impulse passes from the axon of one neuron to the dendrites of another.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | June 2, 2005
karenh@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON, D.C. - Five letters. Two syllables. For Grace Academy eighth-grader Steven Wolfe, the task of spelling the word meaning a nine-instrument or nine-performer composition might have been just a little too easy. "I don't remember studying it. I thought it would be a little harder than that," Steven, 14, said Wednesday after he misspelled "nonet" in the first oral round of the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C. Steven spelled the word "nonette.
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