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NEWS
BY TIM ROWLAND | March 7, 2002
It's been a big week for science, what with discussions of interstellar space travel and our once-a-decade fusion tease. Fusion, as you may remember if you were paying attention in 1989, is the energy-producing process of joining a couple of simple atoms like hydrogen. It's never been successfully done this side of the sun, but it's a big deal because this is ostensibly the process that would allow us to heat our homes and drive our cars on a tank of ordinary tap water. Of course, if it does get that far, I would hope Exxon Mobil and Dick Cheney will be there with their checkbooks to buy up the technology and put it on the shelf, because there's something about the smell of gasoline I really like.
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NEWS
January 30, 2001
Beware rats that dream In answer to the question that has been gnawing at humanity for centuries, scientists announced last week that, yes, rats do dream. Scientists quoted in the Washington Post last week called the news "really exciting. " You may have noticed, though, that everything is really exciting to scientists. If they discover a new, one-celled plant, it is "really exciting. " If the tectonic plates shift one degree to the east it is "really exciting. " If a radio telescope picks up a soundwave from space that goes ztzzztzzz instead of zzztztzzz it is "really exciting.
NEWS
December 7, 1998
By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town photo: DAVE McMILLION CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - In the first collection of its kind, a local hydrologist has published a book on West Virginia caves, bringing together the latest information on the number of caves in the state and their characteristics. Parts of Bill Jones' book is highly technical, dealing with rock formations and water flow patterns in caves. But it also offers an interesting array of photographs of caves across the state, from giant underground formations in Greenbrier County in the southern part of the state to ones that dot the farmland in the Eastern Panhandle.
NEWS
By CLYDE FORD | June 11, 1998
LEETOWN, W.Va. - Scientists will study ways to produce better farm-raised rainbow trout in a $1 million federal research project at the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture in Leetown. The project was announced Tuesday by U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va. He added the research project to a federal agriculture appropriations bill as part of a $5.8 million package of West Virginia projects. The research is intended to map the entire gene system of the trout so scientists can learn how to breed healthy, better-tasting fish, said John Crew, area administrative officer with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service.
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