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NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | January 6, 2005
I had just popped a couple of Vioxx to ease the pain in my Celebrex when the telephone rang. It was the Answering Service in High Heels telling me to call the Cat Lady. Like most average Americans of my age and gender, I had no idea what that meant. "Julie - the woman you wrote about who cloned the cat," Andrea said. "I just talked to her and she wants you to give her a call. " "Oh, OK, good one. Ha ha. Now what do you want?" "No, seriously, I have her cell phone number right here.
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NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | January 2, 2005
andrear@herald-mail.com A universal longing to solve two of life's enduring mysteries - Where did we come from? Are we alone? - drives scientists to continue to searching the sky for answers. Increasingly sophisticated technology aids astrobiologists - scientists from a variety of disciplines who study the origins, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe - in their quest to unlock the secrets of space. Since the first scientific search for extraterrestrial intelligence 40 years ago, scientists, including Dr. Jill Tarter of the SETI Institute, have searched our more than 10-billion-year-old galaxy with optical and radio telescopes - looking and listening for signals that nature alone could not produce.
NEWS
June 15, 2004
So Hagerstown is a Top 5 city in America, according to Money magazine. Maybe as high as No. 2, although that's a little unclear, among 149 ranked towns with populations of less than 250,000.Take that, Annapolis. Hagerstown a Top 5 city. Who knew? Aside from Bill Breichner, that is. He's probably already penning his letter to Money magazine as we speak, arguing that, due to our fine municipal sewer and water plants, we should have been No. 1. In the June edition article called "What Makes a Place Hot," Hagerstown was listed as one of 18 "cities to watch" over the next 10 years.
NEWS
by Chris Copley | June 1, 2004
chrisc@herald-mail.com If there is a science of the future, it is genetics. Nanotechnology still is taking baby steps; computers already have affected nearly every aspect of modern society; lasers have limited applications; space science is sexy but horribly expensive. But genetics, with its new tools and mountains of data is a gold mine waiting to happen. A tool for many purposes You want to find cures for disease? Genetics is your field. You want to develop crops that produce larger yields or grow in harsh conditions?
NEWS
by Chris Copley | April 27, 2004
chrisc@herald-mail.com Oceans are bizarre, almost like alien planets. There are animals with eight or 10 arms, worms and crabs that live in boiling hot water, animals that talk across hundreds of miles using high-pitched squeaks, volcanos taller than Mount Everest. Oceanography is the study of the oceans and things related to them - from animals to kelp to tides to global warming and lots more. Steve Webster knows a lot about the vast range of questions scientists and students ask about oceans.
NEWS
February 3, 2004
The Conococheague Audubon Society will assist in the seventh annual "Great Backyard Bird Count" from Friday, Feb. 13, to Monday, Feb. 16. Participants of all ages and skill levels are welcome to help scientists investigate the status of winter birds by observing and counting birds in backyards. Individuals and families from Nome, Alaska, to Key West, Fla., will be taking part. The "Great Backyard Bird Count" is cosponsored by the Audubon Society and Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, N.Y. To find out more and to participate, go to www.birdsource.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | October 14, 2003
Editor's note: Tim Rowland has been on vacation. In his absence, The Morning Herald is reprinting some of his previous columns. This column first appeared Feb. 26, 1997. By now you know her: Mona-Lisa smile, nice eyes. Rather big ears, though. She's been on the front page of most every major newspaper in the country and answers to the name of Dolly. To be honest, I was late to work and only got quick glances of the three most popular papers. And I thought "What in creation could a sheep have done to get its picture splashed all over the front page?"
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | June 4, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com Patti Gouss, food service manager at Homewood at Williamsport, had her fill of strawberries May 3 at the retirement community's annual Strawberry Fest. Forty-five flats of strawberries - 12 pints each - were used to make more than 400 strawberry shortcakes and sundaes. A committee of Homewood residents capped and sliced more than 500 pints of the juicy red fruit. That's a lot of strawberries. Chet Covert has been growing them for about 15 years and figures he has about four to five acres of them growing on his Greencastle, Pa., farm.
NEWS
by KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | August 24, 2002
kimy@herald-mail.com The former son-in-law of Daniel and Wilda Davis said that he did not conspire to kill his in-laws for inheritance money during the start of testimony for the defense Friday in the first-degree murder trial of Russell Wayne Wagner. Prior to testimony, prosecutors and the defense entered a stipulation into evidence that there was a mixture of blood on the pants worn by Daniel Davis when he was murdered. Scientists from four labs agreed that the pants had blood from Daniel and Wilda Davis but not Wagner.
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