Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsScientists
IN THE NEWS

Scientists

NEWS
June 27, 2008
Science has come a long way since '70s To the editor: I would like to respond to the letter on June 17, 2008, entitled "Environmentalism is License to Intrude" by Edgar Foltz. I, too, read the commentary by George Will on May 28, and I remember from the 1970s seeing the comments in the news that Will referred to stating the climate was getting colder. I differ, however, with the conclusions reached by Will and Foltz that the statements made in 1975 are evidence that the current conclusions on global warming are wrong and that climatologists are confused.
Advertisement
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | March 21, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - Three bank employees each pointed to the same blond, goatee-clad face in the photo lineup, but something seemed wrong. The man they identified was 6-foot-4, but the bank robber shown in surveillance footage was barely taller than the teller window. In fact, when investigators brought the suspect in to stand at the counter, images from the same camera showed his face nearly a head above the robber's. "In this case, we got someone unarrested based on the evidence," said Jeffrey Kercheval, a forensic scientist for the Hagerstown Police Department.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | March 20, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- Three bank employees each pointed to the same blond, goatee-clad face in the photo lineup, but something seemed wrong. The man they identified was 6-foot-4, but the bank robber shown in surveillance footage was barely taller than the teller window. In fact, when investigators brought the suspect in to stand at the counter, images from the same camera showed his face nearly a head above the robber's. "In this case, we got someone unarrested based on the evidence," said Jeffrey Kercheval, a forensic scientist for the Hagerstown Police Department.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | January 21, 2007
Two years ago when Sharpsburg resident Dave Lemarie learned that male fish containing eggs had been discovered in the Potomac River basin, he and his wife stopped drinking tap water. Lemarie, a biologist who is not studying the river - reasoned that if the water did that to the fish, it could not be good for people. Since 2002 there have been several fish kills and a high percentage of tested smallmouth bass found to be intersex - exhibiting characteristics of the opposite sex, said Vicki Blazer, a fish pathologist with the U.S. Geological Survey at the Leetown Science Center in Kearneysville, W.Va.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | October 4, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - For about three hours Tuesday, a forensic scientist told jurors about blood spatter, strange rocks and one usable fingerprint found in the investigation of Shirley P. Finfrock's bludgeoning death. During the second day of testimony in Jack L. Hammersla Jr.'s second trial on charges that he killed Finfrock, Western Maryland Regional Crime Lab Supervisory Forensic Scientist Jeffrey C. Kercheval told jurors the woman was lying on the left side of her bed when the perpetrator - who swung a weapon consistent with a bloodied 2-by-6 found in her living room - stood at her bedside.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | July 6, 2006
Now that even known environmentalist President Bush has acknowledged the realities of global warming, the debate has moved into its next, and most comical, phase. This would be, how to FIX the problem of global warming. Some scientists are saying that the best option is to reduce the noxious gases that are emitted by automobiles, factories, power plants and Harry Reid. But if that doesn't happen, and with any luck it won't, we need to be prepared, scientists say. To that end, they are considering some radical solutions, including -no kidding - an unimaginably huge, circular sunscreen to shield the earth from the sun; tricking the oceans into growing more algae, which would soak up carbon dioxide before dying and falling into the depths of the sea; trillions of tiny mirrors to reflect sunlight; and simulated volcanos to act as atmospheric insulation.
NEWS
By Chad A. Gross | December 31, 2005
To the editor: In response to Doug Martin's "Science deals another blow to design": Mr. Martin, you have great faith in your evolutionary doctrine and those who misconstrue science in order to fit their preconceived naturalistic ideas. I have a few questions that I would like you to ponder for a moment: 1. Where has macroevolution (Example: dog to cat) ever been observed? What's the mechanism for getting new complexity such as new vital organs? How, for example, could a caterpillar evolve into a butterfly?
NEWS
By KRISTIN WILSON | September 9, 2005
kristinw@herald-mail.com Eww! It's the scream heard when a cockroach scurries across the kitchen floor or when antennaed beetles bombard the family picnic. But that's not quite what you'd hear among the Smithsonian Institution's team of entomologists at the National Museum of Natural History. If they had anything to say about such specimens, it might be: Oooh! Ahh! Bugs and insects can be fascinating subjects. On Saturday, Sept. 17, the top insect scientists at the Smithsonian will be sharing their expertise with visitors to the museum.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | January 14, 2005
gregs@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Scientists charged with determining the level of pollutant contamination at the former Central Chemical plant on Mitchell Avenue in Hagerstown did not find any surprises in data released Thursday night, but how much cleanup is needed has yet to be determined. The site that held the former fertilizer and pesticide plant was listed as a federal Superfund site in 1997, warranting federal and local oversight of cleanup efforts. Thursday's discussion at Haven Lutheran Church was the latest in a series of public meetings that have been held to update the community on the project.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|