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NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | April 7, 2010
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - Shepherd Ogden wants you to know where your food comes from - down to the seeds. On Thursday, that's the message he's hoping to convey at Shepherd University during his public lecture, "A Seedy Business: Tales from the International Seed Trade. " The event is the last in the campus's Food Fight Series, highlighting topics addressed by Barbara Kingsolver's book, "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle" "We have come to understanding the idea that there's a whole chain of production that goes back to the seeds," said Ogden, a nationally recognized gardening expert and author.
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NEWS
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | January 4, 2009
Chambersburg, Pa., resident Greg Paulson's images might look like a yet-to-be-discovered foreign world. What seems to be the valley of the Red Planet is actually the wing of a dragonfly. What looks like an extraterrestrial being is actually a pollen basket. What looks like a scene from "Alien" is really a parasitic wasp jumping out from its host, a psylla. Actually, the Shippensburg (Pa.) University biology chair said, every image comes from Earth. And to Paulson, 53, who is an entomologist, every hair, every curve, every thorn-like object is a piece of art. "I like the abstract beauty of it all," he said.
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | September 5, 2010
Local astronomers and those with an interest in the stars don't have to travel far for an educational fix. The William M. Brish Planetarium, formerly called the Washington County Planetarium, offers programs for the public during the school year. The public programs are held on Tuesdays at 7 p.m., beginning Oct. 5 with "The Universe of Dr. Einstein. " The program runs through Nov. 16. Adult admission costs $3 and $2 for children/students. Senior citizens with a WCPS Gold Card are admitted free.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | June 4, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com Patti Gouss, food service manager at Homewood at Williamsport, had her fill of strawberries May 3 at the retirement community's annual Strawberry Fest. Forty-five flats of strawberries - 12 pints each - were used to make more than 400 strawberry shortcakes and sundaes. A committee of Homewood residents capped and sliced more than 500 pints of the juicy red fruit. That's a lot of strawberries. Chet Covert has been growing them for about 15 years and figures he has about four to five acres of them growing on his Greencastle, Pa., farm.
NEWS
June 17, 2003
Tuesday, June 17 7:30 p.m. on Cinemax "Sunshine State" Filmmaker John Sayles attracted a well-known cast - including Edie Falco, Angela Bassett, Miguel Ferrer and Timothy Hutton - for this offbeat story of Florida residents facing encroachment by developers. 8 p.m. on Animal Planet "Wild Kingdom" Lions in the Okavango Delta region of Botswana surprise scientists with their swimming prowess. It seems that this behavior - highly unusual for cats of any size - is an adaptation to the extreme climate of the region's wet season.
NEWS
August 24, 2004
Opening this week "Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid" (PG-13) - A pharmaceutical company sends an expedition of scientists to Borneo to search for a rare black orchid that they hope can unlock secrets of youth and immortality. They discover that the orchid is being used by a swarm of giant snakes that derives its strength, size and vitality from the flowers. The scientists also discover that large snakes are extremely hungry snakes. Starring Johnny Messner and Morris Chestnut.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | May 27, 2004
waynesboro@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Franklin County is loaded with rare species of plant, bird and animal life, an ecologist with the Nature Conservancy said Wednesday. William "Rocky" Gleason, Frederick Sechler and Trina Morris from the conservancy's Middletown, Pa., office gave a slide presentation on the findings of their two-year study to identify Franklin County's best natural environments. The study was funded by the Wild Resource Conservation fund, the Alexander Stewart M.D. Foundation and Franklin County, Gleason said.
NEWS
April 5, 2005
Tuesday, April 5 8 p.m. on the History Channel "Tsunami 2004: Waves of Death" More than 30 countries were affected by the Dec. 26 tsunami, which is said to have killed more people than all the tsunamis of the previous 150 years. This program combines accounts of survivors, explanations from scientists, and footage of the disaster. 8 p.m. on TCM "The Adventures of Errol Flynn" One of Hollywood's biggest stars of his era, Flynn (1909-59) was famous for an offscreen life that seemed to rival his movie exploits.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | August 25, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - Environmental Protection Agency scientists have extended their search for contaminants expelled from Central Chemical by following a groundwater trail to the northeast and southwest of the former Mitchell Avenue plant in Hagerstown. Central Chemical was a pesticide and fertilizer mixing plant that closed in 1984, leaving pesticides and metals that were dumped in the soil and groundwater. An investigation to determine what hazardous chemicals were expelled from the former plant, which is now a federal Superfund waste site, has turned up levels of pesticides DDT in the soil and BHC in the groundwater surrounding it, said Mitch Cron, EPA remedial project manager.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | April 23, 2010
HAGERSTOWN -- Washington County Public Schools is seeking 100 students from four middle schools to participate in a science program that will be sponsored this summer by Fort Detrick in Frederick, Md. The Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Sciences/Young Engineers and Scientists Program will be held during four, four-day sessions this summer at Washington County Technical High School. Sixth- and seventh-graders from E. Russell Hicks, Northern, Springfield and Western Heights middle schools will have a chance to participate in the program.
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