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NEWS
By ARNOLD PLATOU | December 18, 2008
Fusheng Guo held up a test tube and pointed to the clear liquid about the size of a child's marble in the bottom. "Sometimes," Guo said, "you can get $3,000 to $5,000 a gram" for this. "More valuable than gold," added Chris Marschner, manager of the Technical Innovation Center where Protein RST - Guo's life science company - and four others do their work. Guo (pronounced Gew-ah), who works by himself, said he produces "very pure" batches of concentrated protein for other biotech labs doing basic biological research for medical advances.
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NEWS
By ARNOLD PLATOU | December 18, 2008
She is a scientific sleuth in pursuit of a killer. Specifically, Meena Chandok is hunting the earliest signals that human blood cells give one another when they begin mutating into what she calls cancer "culprits. " "What we're trying to detect is when the earliest communications occur, at the point of conception of the disease," Chandok said. "Achieving that could dramatically increase a person's chance of survival," she said. Since May, the 42-year-old Chandok has done her research in a 17-foot-by-18-foot lab she rents at the Technical Innovation Center at Hagerstown Community College.
NEWS
May 27, 2010
COVINGTON, La. (AP) -- The Gulf oil spill has surpassed the Exxon Valdez as the worst in U.S. history, according to new estimates released Thursday, but the Coast Guard and BP said an untested procedure to stop it seemed to be working. A team of scientists trying to determine how much oil has been flowing since the offshore rig Deepwater Horizon exploded April 20 and sank two days later found the rate was more than twice and possibly up to five times as high as previously thought.
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | September 30, 2011
Richard Dawkins might properly be ranked as the most prolific, gifted and colorful writer in explaining the workings of science to the reading public. In “Unweaving The Rainbow,” Dawkins is at his best educating the public about the nature of science with emphasis on evolutionary biology and a deliberate attempt to awaken each reader to the poetic wonder of the awesome universe. Science is not, according to Dawkins, a pessimistic, fatalistic unraveling of nature by soulless investigators.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | August 4, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Forensic scientists from Marshall University and the West Virginia State Police crime lab are expected to testify at the Sept. 2 trial of a Hedgesville, W.Va., man charged in the death of a Martinsburg woman whose decomposed body was found last year in northeastern Berkeley County. Fred Dwayne Douty II of Martinsburg and Anthony Charles Juntilla of Hedgesville each were indicted on charges of first-degree murder. Tina Marie Starcher, 40, allegedly was picked up by two men May 27 and taken to a home in Hedgesville where she was forced to have sex with them and was killed, according to authorities.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | March 20, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- Three bank employees each pointed to the same blond, goatee-clad face in the photo lineup, but something seemed wrong. The man they identified was 6-foot-4, but the bank robber shown in surveillance footage was barely taller than the teller window. In fact, when investigators brought the suspect in to stand at the counter, images from the same camera showed his face nearly a head above the robber's. "In this case, we got someone unarrested based on the evidence," said Jeffrey Kercheval, a forensic scientist for the Hagerstown Police Department.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | January 2, 2005
andrear@herald-mail.com A universal longing to solve two of life's enduring mysteries - Where did we come from? Are we alone? - drives scientists to continue to searching the sky for answers. Increasingly sophisticated technology aids astrobiologists - scientists from a variety of disciplines who study the origins, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe - in their quest to unlock the secrets of space. Since the first scientific search for extraterrestrial intelligence 40 years ago, scientists, including Dr. Jill Tarter of the SETI Institute, have searched our more than 10-billion-year-old galaxy with optical and radio telescopes - looking and listening for signals that nature alone could not produce.
NEWS
by Chris Copley | April 27, 2004
chrisc@herald-mail.com Oceans are bizarre, almost like alien planets. There are animals with eight or 10 arms, worms and crabs that live in boiling hot water, animals that talk across hundreds of miles using high-pitched squeaks, volcanos taller than Mount Everest. Oceanography is the study of the oceans and things related to them - from animals to kelp to tides to global warming and lots more. Steve Webster knows a lot about the vast range of questions scientists and students ask about oceans.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | January 21, 2007
Two years ago when Sharpsburg resident Dave Lemarie learned that male fish containing eggs had been discovered in the Potomac River basin, he and his wife stopped drinking tap water. Lemarie, a biologist who is not studying the river - reasoned that if the water did that to the fish, it could not be good for people. Since 2002 there have been several fish kills and a high percentage of tested smallmouth bass found to be intersex - exhibiting characteristics of the opposite sex, said Vicki Blazer, a fish pathologist with the U.S. Geological Survey at the Leetown Science Center in Kearneysville, W.Va.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | March 21, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - Three bank employees each pointed to the same blond, goatee-clad face in the photo lineup, but something seemed wrong. The man they identified was 6-foot-4, but the bank robber shown in surveillance footage was barely taller than the teller window. In fact, when investigators brought the suspect in to stand at the counter, images from the same camera showed his face nearly a head above the robber's. "In this case, we got someone unarrested based on the evidence," said Jeffrey Kercheval, a forensic scientist for the Hagerstown Police Department.
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