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NEWS
June 21, 2008
You can't believe what Al Gore says To the editor: I find it most distressing that Mr. Jansen, in his letter on global warming, actually based his opinion on Al Gore's propaganda film. He would be hard-pressed to find any scientist (not living off a government grant) who would be able to support Gore or the IPCC report from the UN without blushing. Let's just look at a few facts. 1. The IPCC report was a summary for politicians made by politicians, not scientists.
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NEWS
By ALLAN POWELL | July 3, 2009
Almost to a person, we would not hesitate to support the proposition that we are dramatically improved in character and personality by exposure to higher levels of education. Yet, we are reminded of the limits of this expectation daily when we witness reports of seriously unacceptable behavior by those who ought to do better. In an earlier study, I have made mention of an especially egregious instance of rank prejudice and discrimination regularly perpetrated upon a brilliant young physicist in Germany before Adolf Hitler came to power and accelerated thereafter.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | March 11, 2011
Last summer wasn't a day at the beach for Yunji Seol. It was weeks in a lab. While other teens might have been working on their tans, Yunji, surrounded by microscopes and test tubes, was working on advancing a career in science. The 17-year-old Williamsport High School student was one of a select group of young people who participated in Hagerstown Community College's Biotechnology Summer Institute. Through the competitive program, Yunji gained valuable hands-on laboratory experience, had opportunities to work with professionals and earned college science credits.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | October 4, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - For about three hours Tuesday, a forensic scientist told jurors about blood spatter, strange rocks and one usable fingerprint found in the investigation of Shirley P. Finfrock's bludgeoning death. During the second day of testimony in Jack L. Hammersla Jr.'s second trial on charges that he killed Finfrock, Western Maryland Regional Crime Lab Supervisory Forensic Scientist Jeffrey C. Kercheval told jurors the woman was lying on the left side of her bed when the perpetrator - who swung a weapon consistent with a bloodied 2-by-6 found in her living room - stood at her bedside.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | July 30, 2009
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. -- Students from across West Virginia got up to their knees in the fun of science during the past week to test the waters of possibility at the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA). Open to qualifying students entering ninth grade, the academy engages select West Virginia teenagers in scientific disciplines. In exchange, their college tuition is waived. Shepherd University was one of five institutions across the state to host the 2009 summer camp, said Darlene Stradwick, HSTA field site coordinator.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | January 14, 2005
gregs@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Scientists charged with determining the level of pollutant contamination at the former Central Chemical plant on Mitchell Avenue in Hagerstown did not find any surprises in data released Thursday night, but how much cleanup is needed has yet to be determined. The site that held the former fertilizer and pesticide plant was listed as a federal Superfund site in 1997, warranting federal and local oversight of cleanup efforts. Thursday's discussion at Haven Lutheran Church was the latest in a series of public meetings that have been held to update the community on the project.
NEWS
December 7, 1998
By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town photo: DAVE McMILLION CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - In the first collection of its kind, a local hydrologist has published a book on West Virginia caves, bringing together the latest information on the number of caves in the state and their characteristics. Parts of Bill Jones' book is highly technical, dealing with rock formations and water flow patterns in caves. But it also offers an interesting array of photographs of caves across the state, from giant underground formations in Greenbrier County in the southern part of the state to ones that dot the farmland in the Eastern Panhandle.
NEWS
by KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | August 24, 2002
kimy@herald-mail.com The former son-in-law of Daniel and Wilda Davis said that he did not conspire to kill his in-laws for inheritance money during the start of testimony for the defense Friday in the first-degree murder trial of Russell Wayne Wagner. Prior to testimony, prosecutors and the defense entered a stipulation into evidence that there was a mixture of blood on the pants worn by Daniel Davis when he was murdered. Scientists from four labs agreed that the pants had blood from Daniel and Wilda Davis but not Wagner.
NEWS
By Chad A. Gross | December 31, 2005
To the editor: In response to Doug Martin's "Science deals another blow to design": Mr. Martin, you have great faith in your evolutionary doctrine and those who misconstrue science in order to fit their preconceived naturalistic ideas. I have a few questions that I would like you to ponder for a moment: 1. Where has macroevolution (Example: dog to cat) ever been observed? What's the mechanism for getting new complexity such as new vital organs? How, for example, could a caterpillar evolve into a butterfly?
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | January 6, 2005
I had just popped a couple of Vioxx to ease the pain in my Celebrex when the telephone rang. It was the Answering Service in High Heels telling me to call the Cat Lady. Like most average Americans of my age and gender, I had no idea what that meant. "Julie - the woman you wrote about who cloned the cat," Andrea said. "I just talked to her and she wants you to give her a call. " "Oh, OK, good one. Ha ha. Now what do you want?" "No, seriously, I have her cell phone number right here.
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