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NEWS
By KRISTIN WILSON | September 9, 2005
kristinw@herald-mail.com Eww! It's the scream heard when a cockroach scurries across the kitchen floor or when antennaed beetles bombard the family picnic. But that's not quite what you'd hear among the Smithsonian Institution's team of entomologists at the National Museum of Natural History. If they had anything to say about such specimens, it might be: Oooh! Ahh! Bugs and insects can be fascinating subjects. On Saturday, Sept. 17, the top insect scientists at the Smithsonian will be sharing their expertise with visitors to the museum.
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OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | April 27, 2012
Richard Dawkins must surely be one of the most prolific writers of modern times. While his forte is evolutionary biology, he comfortably ventures into other fields of science. His newest publication, “The Magic of Reality: How We Know What's Really True,” is another gem for one's library. It is, without a doubt, one of the best illustrated science books to be written. Dawkins deals in a masterful way with a very slippery word, “reality.” Dawkins, at the same time, might surprise those who are certain they know “reality.” The pattern followed throughout this book is to tell the mythological origins of each topic and then to show what scientists have found using the tools and methods of science.
NEWS
June 27, 2008
Science has come a long way since '70s To the editor: I would like to respond to the letter on June 17, 2008, entitled "Environmentalism is License to Intrude" by Edgar Foltz. I, too, read the commentary by George Will on May 28, and I remember from the 1970s seeing the comments in the news that Will referred to stating the climate was getting colder. I differ, however, with the conclusions reached by Will and Foltz that the statements made in 1975 are evidence that the current conclusions on global warming are wrong and that climatologists are confused.
NEWS
By CLYDE FORD | June 11, 1998
LEETOWN, W.Va. - Scientists will study ways to produce better farm-raised rainbow trout in a $1 million federal research project at the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture in Leetown. The project was announced Tuesday by U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va. He added the research project to a federal agriculture appropriations bill as part of a $5.8 million package of West Virginia projects. The research is intended to map the entire gene system of the trout so scientists can learn how to breed healthy, better-tasting fish, said John Crew, area administrative officer with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | October 14, 2003
Editor's note: Tim Rowland has been on vacation. In his absence, The Morning Herald is reprinting some of his previous columns. This column first appeared Feb. 26, 1997. By now you know her: Mona-Lisa smile, nice eyes. Rather big ears, though. She's been on the front page of most every major newspaper in the country and answers to the name of Dolly. To be honest, I was late to work and only got quick glances of the three most popular papers. And I thought "What in creation could a sheep have done to get its picture splashed all over the front page?"
NEWS
By ALLAN POWELL | July 10, 2009
Kathleen Parker ("In God and Darwin We Trust," Tuesday, May 12, page A4) probably imagines she has helped to resolve the apparent incompatibility of belief in God and an acceptance of Darwinian biology. She does this by her praise for Dr. Francis Collins, a geneticist and professed fundamentalist Christian who writes and lectures about his conviction he can make a case for the mutual compatibility between the world of science and the domain of faith. Their claims of success are premature.
NEWS
June 15, 2004
So Hagerstown is a Top 5 city in America, according to Money magazine. Maybe as high as No. 2, although that's a little unclear, among 149 ranked towns with populations of less than 250,000.Take that, Annapolis. Hagerstown a Top 5 city. Who knew? Aside from Bill Breichner, that is. He's probably already penning his letter to Money magazine as we speak, arguing that, due to our fine municipal sewer and water plants, we should have been No. 1. In the June edition article called "What Makes a Place Hot," Hagerstown was listed as one of 18 "cities to watch" over the next 10 years.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | July 6, 2006
Now that even known environmentalist President Bush has acknowledged the realities of global warming, the debate has moved into its next, and most comical, phase. This would be, how to FIX the problem of global warming. Some scientists are saying that the best option is to reduce the noxious gases that are emitted by automobiles, factories, power plants and Harry Reid. But if that doesn't happen, and with any luck it won't, we need to be prepared, scientists say. To that end, they are considering some radical solutions, including -no kidding - an unimaginably huge, circular sunscreen to shield the earth from the sun; tricking the oceans into growing more algae, which would soak up carbon dioxide before dying and falling into the depths of the sea; trillions of tiny mirrors to reflect sunlight; and simulated volcanos to act as atmospheric insulation.
NEWS
July 12, 2008
To the editor: I am relieved to learn that there is only one tribe left in "Judah" (Mr. Miller's letter of June 28) because, judging by the accomplishments of the descendants of the ancient Hebrews, it would be too time-consuming to add the other nine tribes' achievements. Though being the 100th smallest state with less that 1/1000 of the world's population, Israel-Judah can claim an astounding number of society's advances in almost every direction. Intel's new multi-core processor was completely developed at facilities in Israel.
NEWS
By MARTHA MENDOZA | May 5, 2010
IRAPUATO, Mexico (AP) - Now it is established scientific fact: Smut is GOOD for you. Corn smut, that is. For years, scientists have assumed that huitlacoche, a gnarly, gray-black corn fungus long savored in Mexico, has nutritional values similar to those of the corn on which it grows. But test results just published in the journal Food Chemistry reveal that an infection that U.S. farmers and crop scientists have spent millions trying to eradicate, is packed with unique proteins, minerals and other nutritional goodies.
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