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NEWS
July 20, 2010
Selected students from Washington County middle and high schools are taking in a paid one-week internship at Washington County Technical High School through the Gains in the Education of Mathemetics and Science/Young Engineers and Scientist program. The GEMS/YES program is funded through the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command and U.S. Army Garrison Fort Detrick. For this year, 170 students were accepted as interns. The student interns are being taught by nine paid Near-Peer Mentors.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | December 6, 2004
Editor's note: This is the third in a monthly series highlighting excellent educators in Washington County high schools. Next month: Hancock Middle-Senior High School. scottb@herald-mail.com CLEAR SPRING - Aline Novak, a Clear Spring High School biology teacher since 1978, clearly has the respect of her peers as she seeks to help her students find science as fascinating as she does. School staff took a vote on which teacher at the school should be profiled for this series.
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | August 9, 2012
On July 4, a large assembly of scientists in Geneva, Switzerland announced that, after spending $10 billion, employing 6,000 researchers and directing tiny subatomic particles on a collision course of 17 miles, they had found what they were looking for. What they found was another tiny particle to be called the Higgs boson, the existence of which they had long suspected. The idea that still another subatomic particle might exist was proposed in 1964 by physicist Peter Higgs. It is an understatement to say that this achievement was remarkable.
NEWS
By LAUREN KIRKWOOD | lauren.kirkwood@herald-mail.com | July 21, 2012
While much of the action at the Washington County Ag Expo & Fair centers around the livestock and agricultural events, kids also got a chance to experiment with hands-on science activities at a 4-H STEM table Saturday. Jamie Kenton, the University of Maryland Extension's faculty extension assistant for 4-H youth development, said activities geared toward encouraging interest in the science, technology, engineering and math fields are an important part of the 4-H program, and are a popular part of the fair.
NEWS
November 5, 2000
Teacher makes science happen before their eyes Editor's Note : The Herald-Mail is featuring one middle school teacher each month through May. The eight-part series highlights excellent educators on the first Monday of each month. Coming in December: E. Russell Hicks Middle School. By TARA REILLY / Staff Writer Eighth grade science teacher John Geist has his own approach to teaching. He doesn't focus on lecturing or overloading kids with homework. Rather, the 53-year-old Clear Spring Middle School teacher prefers assigning science labs and adorning his classroom with rockets, planets and pictures of constellations to keep the students interested.
NEWS
July 20, 2009
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- Wilson College has been awarded a $20,000 grant from the Josiah W. and Bessie H. Kline Foundation of Harrisburg, Pa. The grant will be used to help pay for renovations to Wilson's newly renovated science education building, the Harry R. Brooks Complex for Science, Mathematics and Technology. The Kline Foundation Board of Directors approved the grant in May. The $20,000, which is to be distributed later this year, will be matched by a challenge grant provided by philanthropists Marguerite and H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | July 15, 2005
bonnieb@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - If you look at the stack of handouts on a table in the Wilson College science lab, you'd assume that they were intended for a class of graduate students. With headings such as "Denaturation and Hydrolysis" and "Separation of Proteins and Determination of the Molecular Weight of Hemoglobin Using Gel Filtration Chromatography," the papers are not light summer reading. But the 14 students sitting on the high lab stools performing experiments, discussing the results and punching numbers into calculators are young teens.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | January 6, 2003
pepperb@herald-mail.com Editor's note: This is the fourth in a monthly series highlighting excellent educators in Washington County high schools. Next month: North Hagerstown High School. HANCOCK - Science itself makes class fun, not the teacher, Hancock Middle-Senior High School earth science, physics and chemistry teacher Ray Johnston said. "If it's done right, it can interest a lot of people," he said. "You're working with neat things. " Johnston, 25, said he teaches a variety of students, but said most of the children he teaches are not in upper-level courses and do not always go to college, which presents certain challenges.
NEWS
June 22, 2003
CROSS LANES, W.Va. - What do a New Mexico chili pepper and a 450 million-year-old rock from Connecticut have in common? Tyler Alternative Middle School students have collected these items and more during a special project. Students at the Tyler Mountain area school sent e-mail messages to government officials in all 50 states requesting science treasures. So far, the classes have received packages from 23 states. Science teacher Marcia Anderson said she came up with the idea after visiting another school.
NEWS
By Rev. Gerald A. Barr | September 10, 2005
To the editor: Allan Powell's letter about "faith, science and the difference" in the Saturday Herald Mail merits reconsideration, because Dr. Powell has made some errors that skew his arguments and compromise his conclusions. Dr. Powell states that the most obvious reason intelligent design (ID) is not appropriate for study is that it is not a theory "in any accepted meaning of that term. " The Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary defines a theory as "the analysis of a set of facts in their relation to one another; a hypothesis assumed for the sake of argument or investigation; an unproven assumption.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | September 2, 2013
In her 22 years of teaching, Annie Anders has had many great experiences, but the veteran teacher recently returned from what she described as “one of the best things I've done in my career.” “It was a unique experience. I don't think anything could top it,” said Anders, 43. Anders attended the Mickelson ExxonMobil Teachers Academy, a one-week, all-expenses-paid, intensive professional development program for third- through fifth-grade teachers. The goal of the program is to provide teachers with the knowledge and skills necessary to motivate students to pursue careers in science and math, according to the academy's website, www.sendmyteacher.com.
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NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | August 10, 2013
Studying everything from flight to sound and vision to chemistry, five young girls have been learning about a wide range of topics during Amazing Science Week camp at the Discovery Station in Hagerstown. As they studied the environment on Friday, the girls took turns shaking two bottles taped together that contained liquid to simulate a tornado. “I've loved how we get to experiment on things,” said Kylee McKenrick, 10, of Hagerstown. Kylee, who is entering the fifth grade later this month, said she has learned a lot about how the eye and the ear work, including that cones allow humans to see color, and what can happen when water gets into the ear.  Sydney Lee, 10, of Rockville, Md., who spent the week in the area with her grandmother, also attended the camp, noting that what she learned about chemistry got her attention.
NEWS
Staci Clipp | Around South Hagerstown | July 22, 2013
Discovery Station will hold its Amazing Science Week for girls from Aug. 5 to 9. It is a hands-on, educational learning experience to introduce girls to engineering and science disciplines. It is geared for those entering fourth, fifth and sixth grades. There will be two sessions with five themes: • Kitchen chemistry - acids/bases • Flight • Storms and environments • Sound and music • Vision - “The Wonder of Sight” This is the first program where parents/grandparents will not attend with the girls.  There will be 15 girls in each session.
EDUCATION
July 21, 2013
Twenty-four science teachers from across Maryland converged on Frostburg State University this summer for the Improving Teaching Quality Through Training Opportunities in Physics and Physical Science workshop. The workshop is a residential program designed to enliven the teaching of physics and physical science at teachers' home schools. Attending from Washington County was Paula Bright of North Hagerstown High School. Middle and high school teachers participate in the program to upgrade their content knowledge, integrate technology into their lessons and develop their teaching strategies and practices.
OPINION
July 14, 2013
Memories of Sam Rock, fisher of men To the editor: Sam Rock's love of fishing goes way back. It was a hobby that brought him great enjoyment. When he could get some time away from his other love - barbering - he would get up early and slip off to one of his favorite fishing spots around the county. He thought nothing of spending hours in the quiet solitude of the natural beauty away from the busyness of work in the city. Catch and release was his custom because, while he loved the sport of catching, he preferred to let the beautiful creatures live to be caught another day. In May 1972, at the age of 34, Sam would become the “caught one” by the master fisherman.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | July 14, 2013
Thomas Wayland was having a great time Friday morning pulling in a stubborn rainbow trout that was tugging on his line. “Come on in, fish. It's supper time,” urged the World War II veteran as he leaned out of his wheelchair to reel the trout close to shore and the waiting net. Of the eight fish he landed Friday morning, that 14-inch rainbow wasn't the biggest, “but it's still a very good fish,” he said. The quarter-acre pond is owned and managed by the U.S. Geological Survey's Leetown Science Center.
NEWS
By ALLAN POWELL | July 5, 2013
For those who would like to get a “nuts and bolts” look at what scientists do, what kind of ideas they think about and their attitudes about the world, there is a compact source available. Author and science columnist Natalie Angier, in “The Canon: A Whirligig Tour of the Beautiful Basics of Science,” gives her perception of the insights about the “hard” sciences: Physics, chemistry, biology, geology and astronomy are the subjects. Angier should be congratulated for her competence and range in the production of this publication.
EDUCATION
June 22, 2013
The following area students have recently been accepted into the Frostburg State University Upward Bound Regional Math/Science Center: Laila Abdul Rahman of Frederick, Md., a ninth-grader at Frederick High School Hannah Adeoye of Frederick, a 10th-grader at Gov. Thomas Johnson High School in Frederick Brandon Baber of Hagerstown, a ninth-grader at South Hagerstown High School Peyton Bell of Brunswick, Md., a ninth-grader at...
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | April 30, 2013
Brian Ansel and Kris Pearl thought they were going to spend Tuesday morning observing and helping another teacher work with her students at Bester Elementary School, but the pair was surprised when a group of people walked into the classroom with balloons. Schools Superintendent Clayton Wilcox and officials from the Washington County Public Schools Education Foundation then presented Ansel and Pearl with a large ceremonial check for $1,000. “I was amazed. I was astonished. I was overwhelmed.
EDUCATION
April 14, 2013
A teacher at Highland View Academy in Hagerstown is among 27 science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, educators who were selected for the 2013-14 Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program, according to the Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education. Ophelia Barizo will serve at the National Science Foundation's Directorate for Engineering, Emerging Frontiers in Research Innovation Division, under the guidance of Rosemarie Wesson. Selected educators will serve in Washington, D.C., for 11 months, beginning Sept.
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