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NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | May 1, 2012
Meal prices in Washington County Public Schools will rise by 5 cents next school year - the second straight year of increases - but still will be among the state's lowest, according to a school system official. The Washington County Board of Education on Tuesday approved a $10.35 million Food and Nutrition Services budget for fiscal 2013. The budget includes the increase in meal prices. With the increase, lunch will cost $1.95 for elementary school students, $2.20 for secondary school students and $3.35 for staff members.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | March 15, 2006
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Meals in the Waynesboro Area School District might cost more next year if the proposed food services budget is adopted by the school board. The board will likely adopt the final food services budget in June, according to Caroline Dean, business manager. Preliminary information indicates the cost of lunch for students could increase 15 cents at both the elementary and secondary levels, bringing the total to $1.70 for elementary students and $1.85 for secondary students.
NEWS
July 7, 2003
The Maryland State Department of Education announced revised Income Eligibility Guidelines for free and reduced-price school meals and for free milk. The guidelines are set by the federal government and adopted by the Maryland State Department of Education for school students across the state. They are effective from July 1 through June 30, 2004. Household size and income determine eligibility. For example, a child from a family of four will be entitled to a free lunch and, where available, free breakfast and/or free milk if the household's current annual income is below $23,920.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | February 6, 2011
The federal government is getting ready to require public schools to begin offering more healthful school meals in the future, but the government can’t force kids to eat them. “I think some of the greatest challenge(s), from a nutritional perspective” are getting young people to eat the more healthful food, Washington County Public Schools’ Supervisor of Food and Nutrition Services Jeff Proulx told school board members Tuesday. “Without change in the community as a whole, the nutritional change here may be deemed (by some students)
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | July 5, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - The eligibility guidelines to qualify for free and reduced-price meals in Washington County Public Schools have changed. The income requirements increased slightly, as they do each year, according to Gary Dodds, supervisor of food and nutrition services for the school system. The increase is to accommodate inflation, and Dodds said it should not affect the number of students who qualify for meal assistance. Dodds said about 36 percent of students qualify for free or reduced-price meals.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | November 28, 2011
Washington County Public School lunches are already coming with healthier grains and milks this school year. And other healthy changes were expected to affect school lunches starting with the 2012-13 school year, but Congress has already altered a U.S. Department of Agriculture's proposal and might make more changes, Jeff Proulx, county schools' supervisor of food and nutrition services, said Monday. The menu changes stem from recommendations from the Institute of Medicine, which is the health arm of the National Academy of Sciences, and are proposed in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010.
NEWS
August 20, 2007
FREDERICK, Md. - Frederick County Public Schools will have interpreters available at a Back-to-School Fair and West End Community Fiesta Saturday from noon to 4 p.m. at Frederick Towne Mall, according to a school system press release. The fair will include more than 40 exhibits with information about school registration and services, school meals, child care, health care, adult classes and community activities. The event also will feature a balloon artist, magician, clown, and jazz and mariachi bands, according to the release.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | June 13, 2012
Using their fingers or plastic forks, dozens of people invited to South Hagerstown High School on Wednesday tasted a variety of potential new menu items as the county school system moves toward offering students healthier foods that use fresher ingredients. Most of the items were new, such as a curried chicken wrap and Asian vegetable noodle lettuce wraps, and others were an attempt at a healthier version of existing dishes offered at schools, said Jeff Proulx, supervisor of Food and Nutrition Services for Washington County Public Schools.
NEWS
by DON AINES | June 5, 2007
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Eating healthier comes at a cost and that will be reflected in higher lunch prices next year in the Chambersburg Area School District. Last week, the school board approved a 10-cent increase in lunches and a 5-cent increase in milk, Business Manager Rick Vensel said. The cost of an elementary school lunch will be $1.80, a secondary lunch will be $1.95 and milk will be 35 cents, Food Service Director Ann Ziobrowski said Monday. Inflation and higher salaries and benefits account for part of the increase, but Vensel said better nutrition also figures into the equation.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | September 1, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com You no longer can find cakes, whole milk and some chips on sale at cafeterias in Washington County Public Schools: Those and other food items have been replaced with more nutritional, less fatty products, school system officials say. When students returned to school Aug. 25, the menu of items on sale in the cafeteria had changed, said Gary Dodds, supervisor of food and nutrition services. The changes were made in response to state government mandates that ordered all school systems to develop, by January, a master plan for how they are going to ensure that all food items on sale in cafeterias meet certain health requirements, Dodds said Rather than changing the menu during the school year, he decided to make the changes before school started, he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | August 9, 2013
The Washington County Community Action Council has received a $45,000 grant to expand its summer and after-school meal programs. The grant money, which came from the Walmart Foundation, was funneled through the National League of Cities. Under the program, meals in the summer have been provided every weekday in the parking lot between Cortland Apartments and Cortland Mansion from 11 a.m. to 11:35 a.m. and at Otterbein United Methodist Church from 12 to 12:35 p.m.  “We're very fortunate we've been able to receive the grant to allow us to finish out this program year and also expand the program during the winter with after-school meals, and then looking at expanding with a vehicle for a summer program next year,” said Dave Jordan, executive director of the action council.
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EDUCATION
July 24, 2013
Clayton Wilcox, superintendent For questions regarding school system policies, academics, procedures or programs. Phone number: 301-766-2816 wilcocla@wcps.k12.md.us Chris South, chief financial officer For questions or concerns about the Washington County Board of Education's budgets, accounting, payroll or purchasing. Phone number: 301-766-2827 southchr@wcps.k12.md.us Boyd Michael, deputy superintendent For questions about school maintenance projects, or anything else related to school system operations.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | April 3, 2013
Meal prices for Washington County Public Schools' students and staff will increase for the third consecutive year, due mainly to cost increases such as food and paper supplies, Food and Nutrition Services Supervisor Jeff Proulx said. The Board of Education voted unanimously Tuesday to approve the $10.7 million Food and Nutrition Services operating budget, which includes a 10-cent increase for school breakfasts and lunches for the new school year. Meal prices increased 5 cents for this school year, and went up 10 cents for the 2011-12 school year.
NEWS
Lynn Little | August 21, 2012
As a new school year begins, it is important to remember the role nutrition plays in assuring kids a successful school year. Proper nutrition is crucial for social, emotional and psychological development. Nutrition and learning go hand in hand. Kids who are nutritionally fit are more likely to have the energy, stamina and self-esteem that enhance their ability to learn. Parents can help ensure that their child is well nourished and ready-to-learn by considering the following: Start with a healthful breakfast.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | June 13, 2012
Using their fingers or plastic forks, dozens of people invited to South Hagerstown High School on Wednesday tasted a variety of potential new menu items as the county school system moves toward offering students healthier foods that use fresher ingredients. Most of the items were new, such as a curried chicken wrap and Asian vegetable noodle lettuce wraps, and others were an attempt at a healthier version of existing dishes offered at schools, said Jeff Proulx, supervisor of Food and Nutrition Services for Washington County Public Schools.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | November 28, 2011
Washington County Public School lunches are already coming with healthier grains and milks this school year. And other healthy changes were expected to affect school lunches starting with the 2012-13 school year, but Congress has already altered a U.S. Department of Agriculture's proposal and might make more changes, Jeff Proulx, county schools' supervisor of food and nutrition services, said Monday. The menu changes stem from recommendations from the Institute of Medicine, which is the health arm of the National Academy of Sciences, and are proposed in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010.
OPINION
July 19, 2011
No Child Left Behind is a failure To the editor: As citizens who are footing the bill for Washington County Public Schools we deserve better than what we are getting for our money. If the article in The Herald-Mail is correct, No Child Left Behind is really a dismal failure. Did I read it correctly that there are seventh-graders that are reading at third- or fourth-grade level? This is a sad statement about our school system. How can a child reading at the fourth-grade level even participate at a seventh-grade level?
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | February 6, 2011
The federal government is getting ready to require public schools to begin offering more healthful school meals in the future, but the government can’t force kids to eat them. “I think some of the greatest challenge(s), from a nutritional perspective” are getting young people to eat the more healthful food, Washington County Public Schools’ Supervisor of Food and Nutrition Services Jeff Proulx told school board members Tuesday. “Without change in the community as a whole, the nutritional change here may be deemed (by some students)
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | February 6, 2011
Washington County Public Schools students could pay up to a dime more for a school lunch beginning in the fall, and cafeteria meals will limit calories and salt to get a head start on federal proposals aimed at serving more healthful food to the nation’s youth. Washington County Board of Education officials on Tuesday questioned whether students would go for the more healthful meals, or whether they would instead pack their lunches or buy a la carte items. The meal changes are federal proposals designed to fight obesity and improve health among the nation’s young people.
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