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Sauerkraut

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LIFESTYLE
September 11, 2012
Julia Brugh of Hagers-town has canned with her mother and sister for many years. "I refer to our endeavors as the Wildcat Growers Cooperative, after a fictional island called Wildcat Island our father used to tell us stories about when he was alive," Brugh said. This is an old recipe the Wildcat Growers Cooperative used this year that my mother, Peggy Stinson, learned from her father. Her grandfather grew up in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., and lived there before it became a national historical park.
NEWS
March 12, 2008
Start to finish: 3 hours; 5 minutes active 3 pounds sauerkraut, drained 3 1/2 cups chicken broth 1 medium yellow onion, chopped 1 teaspoon juniper berries (optional) 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper In a medium saucepan with a lid, combine the sauerkraut, chicken broth, onion, juniper berries and pepper. Bring to a boil, then reduce to low. Cover and simmer 2 to 3 hours. Serve with roasted fresh ham. Serves 12.
NEWS
July 7, 2009
The Herald-Mail would like to publish penny-pinching, tasty recipes by thrifty cooks in the Tri-State area on the Food page every week. Contact staff writer Julie Greene at 301-733-5131 or 800-626-6397, ext. 2320, or
NEWS
November 3, 2009
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- First Lutheran Church in Chambersburg hosted its 12th annual pork and sauerkraut dinner Monday night. Money raised at the event goes to Lutheran Social Services programs. Twelve area congregations were involved and more than 160 pounds of the main dish were prepared for the dinner.
NEWS
December 30, 2009
Calvary Temple, 147 S. Conococheague St. in Williamsport, will hold a pork and sauerkraut dinner on New Year's Day from 4 to 7 p.m. Tickets cost $6 for adults and $3 for those ages 3 to 12. The menu includes pork, sauerkraut, mashed potatoes, green beans and corn, dessert and drinks.
NEWS
By ASHLEY HARTMAN | January 1, 2008
WILLIAMSON, Pa. - Fellowship and the Pennsylvania Dutch tradition of eating pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Eve brought many senior citizens out on a slightly wet afternoon to Camp Joy El. The little bit of snow on the side of the road did not keep about 200 people from coming to the meal. "I grew up eating sauerkraut," said Aaron Ziebarth, executive director of Joy El Ministries. "Supposedly (eating pork and sauerkraut) either brings good luck or good fortune in the new year.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | January 1, 2007
GREENCASTLE, PA. - Some of the senior citizens seated at tables in the Joy El Ministries Dining Hall on Sunday said they had never heard of the Pennsylvania Dutch belief that eating pork and sauerkraut on New Year's brings good luck throughout the coming 12 months. Others had been raised with that notion, so traditions became a prominent conversation among the more than 225 people gathered for the free meal - a Joy El tradition since the 1970s. "I'm at the point where if we don't have pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day, it doesn't seem right," Georgia Hoffeditz of Chambersburg, Pa., said.
NEWS
September 6, 2006
1 head cabbage (about 3 pounds) Large pot of boiling water 1 large can sauerkraut 2 pounds ground chuck 1/2 cup warm water 1 beaten egg 1/2 medium onion, finely diced 1 cup uncooked rice Salt and pepper, to taste 1 cup tomato sauce 1 cup ketchup Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cut cabbage deeply around core to loosen leaves. Remove core. Boil cabbage for about five minutes. Take leaves apart and set aside to cool. Remove about 1 inch of rib from the cabbage leaves.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | January 1, 2011
Slow-cooked pork and sauerkraut, a New Year’s Day traditional meal in Stephanie Baker’s family, quickly has become a successful fundraising draw for the youth group at Calvary Temple in Williamsport. “We’re always looking for good fundraisers and this was a really good one last year,” youth group leader Stephanie Baker said as a steady stream of people arrived Saturday at the church for the second year of the fundraising dinner. The inaugural event last year attracted close to 150 people, according to worship leader Lisa Harrell, who collected money as people arrived for the dinner.
NEWS
March 14, 1999
March 17 - March 23 The Washington County Commission on Aging offers noon lunches to anyone over 60 years old at seven locations - Hancock, Smithsburg, Keedysville, Williamsport and three in Hagerstown. A two-day reservation notice is required and a donation is asked per meal. For information, call 301-790-0275. Weekly menu Wednesday - Roast turkey and gravy, mashed potatoes, sauerkraut, St. Patrick cookie, Irish applesauce and milk. Thursday - Baked macaroni and ham carbonero, broccoli, sweet potato biscuit, cherries and milk.
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NEWS
July 14, 2013
The Washington County Commission on Aging offers noon lunches to anyone 60 years and older at six locations - Smithsburg, Keedysville, Williamsport and three in Hagerstown. Smithsburg, Keedysville and Williamsport are open Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Potomac Towers, Walnut Towers and Francis Murphy are open Monday through Friday. The hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the days they are open. The agency requires that you call by 11:30 a.m. to give them a two-working-days reservation notice.
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NEWS
Linda Murray | Around West Hagerstown | March 27, 2013
Washington Square United Methodist Church will hold its pork and sauerkraut dinner Saturday, April 13, from 3 to 6 p.m. The menu also includes mashed potatoes, green beans, applesauce, bread, dessert and drinks. Tickets cost $8 for adults, $3.50 for those ages 6 to 10 and $2 for those ages 3 to 5. It will be eat in or carry out. The church is at 538 Washington Ave. and has parking off the alley near the back entrance. For tickets, call Mike Martin at 301-739-2653.   Mission Auxiliary to hold bake sale The Hagerstown Rescue Mission Ladies Auxiliary will hold an Easter bake sale at the thrift store Saturday, March 30, from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The items for sale include cakes, cookies, pies, pickled eggs and other items.
LIFESTYLE
September 11, 2012
Julia Brugh of Hagers-town has canned with her mother and sister for many years. "I refer to our endeavors as the Wildcat Growers Cooperative, after a fictional island called Wildcat Island our father used to tell us stories about when he was alive," Brugh said. This is an old recipe the Wildcat Growers Cooperative used this year that my mother, Peggy Stinson, learned from her father. Her grandfather grew up in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., and lived there before it became a national historical park.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@hrald-mail.com | January 1, 2012
Legends are hard to break. People in the deep South believe eating black-eyed peas, rice and greens on New Year's Day brings luck and money. Pennsylvanians of German heritage say eating pork and sauerkraut on the first day of the year means luck for the rest of the year. On Sunday afternoon, about 250 people, not all of German descent, were not only hoping for a good year, they were also enjoying a fine dinner of pork and sauerkraut, mashed potatoes and applesauce prepared by the members of Pond Bank Mennonite Church, a 120-member congregation on the community's main street.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | December 31, 2011
Take 60 pounds of sauerkraut and 80 pounds of pork, toss into the mix 60 pounds of chicken and some corn and mashed potatoes, and you have the recipe for Camp Joy El's New Year's Eve pork and sauerkraut dinner. Camp Joy El's traditional pork and sauerkraut dinner has been a popular mainstay for almost 40 years. But Saturday's crowd was so large that camp staffers donned reflective vests and helped direct cars into designated spaces in order to accommodate more than 220 people who attended the annual event sponsored by Joy El Ministries.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | December 28, 2011
For many, pork and sauerkraut is not only tasty, but a must on New Year's Day. German legend promises that eating pork and sauerkraut on the first day of the year brings good luck all year. But Fayetteville (Pa.) Fire Co. President Mark Bumbaugh thinks it just tastes delicious. "I love it. It's a tradition (on New Year's Day)," Bumbaugh said. Six years ago, the fire company began ringing in the New Year with the traditional meal, which has an unmistakable smell. Proceeds from the all-you-can-eat pork and sauerkraut meal will benefit the fire company, he said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | January 1, 2011
Slow-cooked pork and sauerkraut, a New Year’s Day traditional meal in Stephanie Baker’s family, quickly has become a successful fundraising draw for the youth group at Calvary Temple in Williamsport. “We’re always looking for good fundraisers and this was a really good one last year,” youth group leader Stephanie Baker said as a steady stream of people arrived Saturday at the church for the second year of the fundraising dinner. The inaugural event last year attracted close to 150 people, according to worship leader Lisa Harrell, who collected money as people arrived for the dinner.
NEWS
December 21, 2009
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Camp Joy El will host its traditional pork and sauerkraut dinner on Thursday, Dec. 31. People ages 55 and older are invited to the dinner, which starts at noon. The event is free, although attendees are asked to bring a dessert to share. Entertainment will be provided by the Joy Chorale. Reservations are required. To make a reservation, call Camp Joy El at 717-369-4539.
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