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By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | January 12, 2012
The mild weather the area has experienced so far this winter has resulted in an accumulation of a different sort in Washington County. Hagerstown and county officials say their salt bins are full following only one light snowfall this calendar year. “I would say we're definitely ahead of the game at this point,” Hagerstown Public Works Manager Eric Deike said. “But most of our snow comes in January and February. We're definitely not out of the woods.” Deike said the city has spent $13,700 on salt since this fiscal year began July 1. During that time, the city salted when a premature snow storm struck on Halloween and after a light dusting on Jan. 3. He said the city is typically well above that cost around this time of year.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | January 18, 2011
State and local transportation officials said Tuesday that road crews are prepared with enough salt to attack the next winter storm that moves through Washington County. Washington County Highway Director Ed Plank said he was expecting a 500-ton shipment of salt to arrive today in case another storm blankets the roadways with ice and snow. "We'll be in pretty good shape," Plank said. "We're holding our own on salt. " Plank said Washington County road crews began salting roads at about 9 p.m. Monday to prepare for a storm that dropped roughly 1 1/2 inches of snow and ice. Crews were expected to stay out into this morning to finish clearing roads of snow from Monday's storm and anything that might follow.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | November 30, 1999
TRI-STATE This winter's weather has been so mild that crews treated roads with salt remaining from last year's supply when the first significant snowfall of the season hit earlier this month. Eric Deike, the City of Hagerstown's director of public works, said the city's salt reserve was in excellent shape when the first snow fell Jan. 21. Hagerstown used about 180 tons of salt left over from last winter on the snow- and ice-slickened streets, Deike said. The city has about $80,000 in its budget to buy salt for roads and some sidewalks, he said.
NEWS
September 28, 1999
If you add a potato to soup will it soak up the excess salt? Lyn Dunham, a reader from Falling Waters, W.Va., asked us if there's any truth to an old tip she's heard for getting rid of excess salt in food. [cont. from lifestyle ] She heard that if a raw potato is sliced and put into the food, such as soup, it will absorb the unwanted salt. "It's more of a wives' tale," says Michael Toth, culinary arts instructor at Washington County Technical High School in Hagerstown.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | December 7, 2006
The City of Hagerstown plans its snow plowing and/or removal based on five storm scenarios, City Public Works Manager Eric B. Deike said. · In the first, the temperature is hovering around 30 degrees and the road surface is wet. The precipitation can be snow, sleet or freezing rain. The city, for snow or sleet, would apply salt at 500 pounds per mile. Salt would be applied at 200 pounds per mile in freezing rain. Plowing and salting would occur simultaneously if accumulations occur.
NEWS
January 3, 2002
It's cold enough, but snow's on hold By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town If you hate snow like the kind Buffalo, N.Y., is getting, rejoice. If you love it, you will just have to wait. Apart from some possible snow flurries today, there is no chance of precipitation in sight for the Tri-State area, and the roughest winter weather local residents will have to deal with in coming days is cold temperatures, meteorologist John Margraf said. From now until at least Tuesday, high temperatures will hover in the upper 30s, Margraf said.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | September 20, 2006
This year's ingredients contest consists of foods found in my kitchen. Here are a few hints to help you in your quest to win $50 in The Herald-Mail's third annual ingredients contest. Please include brand names in your answers. 1. I grew up on the Eastern Shore. No respectable Shoreman or Shorewoman would be caught without one of these items in particular in their kitchen. I have two of these. One for the kitchen and one for travel. 2. I like to try new things so a couple of these items are not stocked in the typical pantry.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | February 1, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com Benita Hawkins has become very familiar with Hagerstown's snow-clearing policy in the past two months. The sidewalks in front of her West Side Avenue home have been cleared twice by a city contractor, for total charges of $514. The charges included $200 in city administrative fees, $90 for two salt applications and $224 in labor costs. "I can understand keeping the city clean - it's safe - but do it fair," Hawkins said Friday. Hawkins, 46, said she has lived in the city for eight years.
NEWS
April 27, 2005
Do you know what's in the food you eat? The Herald-Mail Co. will award $50 to the person who can correctly name the food product that matches each of the following 10 ingredient lists. Ingredients are listed just about how they appear on specific products - minus information in parentheses - so be specific with your answers. Here are some other rules: Herald-Mail employees and their relatives are not eligible to participate. The individual who correctly names the most products will win. If there's a tie, one winner will be drawn randomly from those who qualify.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | March 4, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - The City of Hagerstown has spent about $252,132 to clear the streets of ice and snow during seven storms since Dec. 5, the city public works director said. Labor, overtime, salt and equipment expenses accounted for the costs, said Eric Deike, public works director. About $97,868 - roughly 28 percent - of the city's annual snow-removal budget remains. City officials budget about $350,000 a year for snow and ice removal, he said. That figure is based on a 10-year average.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | June 27, 2013
I enjoy fresh salmon, and some of the most flavorful grilled salmon I tasted was offered in Texas.  After a trip to the San Antonio Culinary Institute of America, I thought of no better way to offer tribute to this wonderful fish than creating a delicious grilled recipe. The secret to the recipe and a way to offer less sodium is to add in some vinegar or fruity acid from either lemon or lime.  The acid tricks your tastebuds into thinking there is more salt in the dish than was actually used.
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NEWS
Lisa Prejean | July 5, 2012
After two fainting episodes this summer, my doctor supplied a simple solution: Sodium chloride. Apparently, I need more salt in my diet. Most people would love to have that diagnosis, rather than the opposite one: Limit your salt intake. I've heard mature women say they hide the salt shaker from their husbands. People with high blood pressure are told to avoid salt, but when low blood pressure is a problem, salt could provide a remedy. Salt, after all, provides a balance.
LIFESTYLE
June 22, 2012
Sarah Baker, 26, of Sharpsburg, is a self-taught cook, though she did have some role models. "I learned just by going into the kitchen and through trial and error. I've just always had a love of baking," she said. "I will say my grandfather is a very avid baker. He is known for his apple pies. " Now married, Baker often cooks for her husband and parents. "I garden, so I do a lot of fresh cooking. We eat suppers at home a lot," she said. "It's nice to go out to eat, but you can make something to your own liking at home.
OPINION
June 8, 2012
Two of my favorite food groups, salt and sugar, were in the news this week. Grease and chocolate, meanwhile, managed to fly under the national radar, at least for the time being. For salt, the news was good, although bad for anyone who has deprived himself of dry-roasted peanuts for the last four decades, and might now be tempted to go after the Department of Agriculture with a machete. Writing an op-ed in the New York Times, health-policy researcher Gary Taubes rather effectively destroys the conventional wisdom that salt is bad for you. In fact, some studies show that the greater danger is getting too little salt.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | January 12, 2012
The mild weather the area has experienced so far this winter has resulted in an accumulation of a different sort in Washington County. Hagerstown and county officials say their salt bins are full following only one light snowfall this calendar year. “I would say we're definitely ahead of the game at this point,” Hagerstown Public Works Manager Eric Deike said. “But most of our snow comes in January and February. We're definitely not out of the woods.” Deike said the city has spent $13,700 on salt since this fiscal year began July 1. During that time, the city salted when a premature snow storm struck on Halloween and after a light dusting on Jan. 3. He said the city is typically well above that cost around this time of year.
LIFESTYLE
December 13, 2011
Salted caramel hot chocolate cookies   1 cup butter, softened 1 1/4 cups white sugar 3/4 cup brown sugar 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 cup cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 cups flour 36 chocolate-covered soft caramel candies (see cook's note) 1 cup finely chopped pecans (see cook's note) 1 tablespoon coarse sea salt Cream together butter, and white and brown sugars in a large bowl until fluffy.
NEWS
February 8, 2011
Funkstown Mayor Paul N. Crampton Jr. Tuesday night praised town employee Jeffrey Smith for the job he's done this winter plowing and salting the town's streets. "I've never had to call him about anything this year. He just comes in and does what needs to be done," Crampton said during a mayor and Town Council workshop meeting at Town Hall. Smith was not present at the meeting. — Julie E. Greene
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | February 1, 2011
If it starts with an "S," local hardware stores are selling it. Salt, sleds and snow shovels are the hottest selling commodities when winter storms hit, several local hardware store owners said. "We're running out of salt in a hurry," said Theodore Hovermale, owner of Clear Spring Hardware on Cumberland Street. "The problem is we can't get more. The suppliers are running out, too. " But despite being low on salt, Hovermale said the biggest shortage is customers. January and February are typically the slowest months for hardware stores, which get more customers in the spring when people start to garden.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | January 31, 2011
With some residential streets still snow-covered and a likely ice storm on the way, Washington County officials urged caution and patience as county road crews attempt to stretch a dwindling salt supply. As the storm approached Monday evening, Washington County Director of Public Works Joseph Kroboth III said the county had enough salt to treat roads for 12 to 18 hours once icy conditions begin, but crews would not be pretreating roads. Because they were conserving salt for the approaching storm, county crews also have not had enough salt to melt the hard-packed snow and ice that still covers some residential streets from last week’s snow, Kroboth said.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | January 18, 2011
State and local transportation officials said Tuesday that road crews are prepared with enough salt to attack the next winter storm that moves through Washington County. Washington County Highway Director Ed Plank said he was expecting a 500-ton shipment of salt to arrive today in case another storm blankets the roadways with ice and snow. "We'll be in pretty good shape," Plank said. "We're holding our own on salt. " Plank said Washington County road crews began salting roads at about 9 p.m. Monday to prepare for a storm that dropped roughly 1 1/2 inches of snow and ice. Crews were expected to stay out into this morning to finish clearing roads of snow from Monday's storm and anything that might follow.
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