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Sales Tax

NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | January 11, 2012
Word of a possible state sales-tax increase added a dose of reality Wednesday to the fanfare of the opening day of the Maryland General Assembly's 2012 session. Gov. Martin O'Malley said that he's considering proposing another penny on the state's sales tax, increasing it from 6 percent to 7 percent. O'Malley, a Democrat, said the state has to figure out how to fill gaps in the state's operating budget, its Transportation Trust Fund, and water and wastewater infrastructure. Many legislators are expecting the governor to propose increases in the state's gasoline tax and the tax on sewer and septic use this year.
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OPINION
November 18, 2011
“Hey, make sure you don't miss the best new comedy series on TV this fall: the Republican debates.” - Hagerstown “Congratulations, Hagerstown and Washington County. You criticize our few unions. This area is mostly nonunion. You should be proud that half of Washington County students are below poverty level.” - Keedysville “I'd like to thank the two ladies who found my wallet at the Davis Funeral Home in Smithsburg, Md. ... I appreciate that, and may the good Lord always look over you two angels.
OPINION
October 25, 2011
Two tax plans that hurt the working poor To the editor: What do a Maryland transportation-funding commission and presidential candidate Herman Cain have in common? Both are proposing plans to raise revenue that will devastate the working poor. Cain's 9-9-9 plan will decrease his own personal taxes while dramatically increasing taxes on the working poor. The sales tax, in particular, will hurt. There are many families of four living below the poverty line despite having one or more family members working one or more jobs.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | August 14, 2011
When Mike Osborne heard about Maryland's decision to drop its sales tax for a week to coincide with back-to-school shopping, he knew he would be visiting some stores. “(It's) one of the few breaks I'll get on taxes in my lifetime, that's for sure,” Osborne said as he shopped for clothes for his 17-year-old son in the crowded Aeropostale store at Valley Mall Sunday afternoon. Shop Maryland, which began Sunday and continues through Saturday, allows shoppers to avoid the state's 6 percent sales tax on apparel and footwear priced at $100 and less.
NEWS
August 13, 2011
Maryland's sales tax holiday week begins today and runs through Saturday. Most clothing and footwear priced up to $100 is free of Maryland's sales tax during the one-week period. "The tax-free week was a great success last year," said Patrick Donoho, president of the Maryland Retailers Association. "It got consumers out shopping again after suffering hard economic times. This year, we hope more consumers will take advantage of the substantial savings offered by local retailers during this week.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | August 1, 2011
Christopher B. Shank said his strongest feeling about the debt-ceiling battle in Washington, D.C., is as an American citizen, not as a Maryland state senator. “I am deeply frustrated at both sides at their inability to get the job done,” Shank, R-Washington, said Monday. He said elected officials - Republicans and Democrats - go to Annapolis to work on state issues. One party might challenge the other party during the legislative process, but in the end, the General Assembly fulfills its responsibilities, he said.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | August 1, 2011
Maryland is dropping its sales tax on certain products for a week, an effort timed to coincide with back-to-school shopping. Shop Maryland Week will be Aug. 14 to 20. Qualifying apparel and footwear will be exempt from the state's 6 percent sales tax. The state held similar tax holidays for a week in 2001, five days in 2006 and a week in 2010. Maryland Comptroller Peter V.R. Franchot, a Democrat, said Monday at Premium Outlets at Hagerstown that the tax-free week is a temporary reprieve for state residents.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | July 1, 2011
Local proprietors bracing for Maryland’s 3-percentage-point hike in alcohol sales tax that takes effect Friday said the impact of the legislature’s decision is still months away. “It’s too early to tell how much this will affect businesses in Washington County,” said Lou Thomas, president of the Washington County Restaurant and Beverage Association and owner of The Yellow House in Boonsboro. “Sure, it’s going to hurt,” he said. “Let’s face it, this is a 50 percent increase in the tax rate.” Maryland sales and use tax on alcohol is increasing from 6 percent to 9 percent.
OPINION
April 20, 2011
Strapped for cash, as always, the Maryland General Assembly increased the sales tax on alcoholic beverages from 6 percent to 9 percent this session. We have less problem with the tax itself, than we do with the fact that, as always, what should be a matter of statewide benefit has been twisted into a none-too-subtle money grab by the metropolitan areas without consideration of the tax’s effect on more rural areas. The alcohol tax hadn’t been raised in decades, and while we doubt proponents’ claims that it will reduce alcohol abuse and underage drinking, this tax hike was probably preferable to some other revenue streams the state might have tapped into.
OPINION
January 30, 2011
After reading Allan Powell's "Kentucky Edutainment" op-ed piece, we found it remarkable that a professor (albeit retired) simply did not do his homework. He appeared to write  knowledgeably about our future full-size Noah's Ark in northern Kentucky, but his starting point was wrong. We hope he was more careful when imparting knowledge to his students. Powell evidently based his column on second-hand information (i.e., using other newspaper columnists, bloggers, etc.) rather than confirming with original sources.
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