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NEWS
April 2, 2010
AUG. 28, 1923-APRIL 1, 2010 HANCOCK, Md. - Joseph F. "Joe" Weller Jr., age 86, of Maryland Avenue, died Thursday, April 1, 2010, at NMS in Hagerstown, Md. Born Aug. 28, 1923, in Maryland, he was the son of the late Joseph F. Weller Sr. and Vergie G. Helser Weller and the husband of Lucille A. Douglas Weller, whom he married July 14, 1946, and who died May 7, 2006. He was a veteran of World War II, serving in the U.S. Navy. He retired in 2005 from D.L. Bowman as a truck driver.
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NEWS
September 16, 2004
Air Force Airman Richard J. Saunders, the son of Richard Saunders Jr. of Hagerstown and Deborah Mumaw of Greencastle, Pa., has graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. Saunders is a 2001 graduate of South Hagerstown High School. Air Force Reserve Airman 1st Class Tabita Enciu, daughter of Nicanor and Antonina Enciu of Hagerstown, has graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio. Enciu is a 1999 graduate of James M. Bennett Senior High School, Salisbury, Md. Pfc. Andrew Lynn, son of James and Linda Lynn of Hagerstown, graduated in October 2003 from Infantry School at Fort Benning, Ga. Lynn is stationed at Fort Lewis, Wash.
NEWS
BY DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | March 8, 2002
Hundreds of pages of memos, reports, interviews and diagrams that were part of the government investigation into the October 2000 terrorist attack on the USS Cole can now be found at the Washington County Free Library. Williamsport resident Thomas Wibberley, whose son Craig was one of the 17 sailors killed in the attack, recently donated his copy of the report to the library. "I just figured that with the whole incident, and Craig being from this area, (the library) would be a good place for them instead of me just putting them in the attic," Wibberley said.
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | September 30, 2004
shappell@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - The father of a sailor killed during the bombing of the USS Cole nearly four years ago said he does not believe the two men sentenced to death for their involvement in the attack should be executed. The father of another local man who died in the Cole bombing said he believed that death by firing squad for the men was "absolutely appropriate. " Washington County residents Michael Roy and Tom Wibberley said they were informed Wednesday that two men were sentenced to death during a proceeding in Yemen.
NEWS
May 28, 2010
SAN DIEGO (AP) -- Retired Navy Lt. John Finn -- the first American to receive the nation's highest military award for defending sailors under a torrent of gunfire during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor -- died Thursday. He was 100. Finn was the oldest of 97 Medal of Honor recipients from World War II still living. He died at a nursing home for veterans in Chula Vista, outside San Diego, according to a Navy statement. Despite head wounds and other injuries, Finn, the chief of ordnance for an air squadron, continuously fired a .50-caliber machine gun from an exposed position as bullets and bombs pounded the Naval Air Station at Kaneohe Bay in Oahu.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | October 13, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - It has been four years since U.S. Navy Fireman Patrick Roy, 19, of Keedysville, and Seaman Craig Wibberley, 19, of Williamsport, died in an attack on the USS Cole but Wibberley's father said Tuesday the memories and pain remain fresh. Tom Wibberley made the comment Tuesday on the anniversary of the Cole attacks, following separate ceremonies at the graves of his son and Roy. Both ceremonies were organized by the Veterans of Foreign Wars.
ANTIETAM
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | September 12, 2012
The muster rolls tell a unique story of the Civil War - one that contradicts the stereotype of a struggle between white farmers, North and South. Scan the record books and you'll find Union Shawnee and rebel Choctaws, Confederate rabbis and Arab immigrants. There were units called the Slavonian Rifles and the Irish Brigade and one individual who defied classification - Sgt. Frank Mayne from Pennsylvania, who was discovered to be a woman by the name of Frances Day. There also was a group of people who many believe were onlookers to the war - African-Americans.
NEWS
By DON AINES | October 3, 2007
There are 78,773 soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen still listed as missing in action from World War II, with another 8,100 from the Korean War and 1,773 from the Vietnam War, according to the Web site www.aiipow/mia.com . Work to recover and identify remains continues decades after those wars ended, and families who have members listed as missing in action can assist in the process, said Paul Bethke of the Casualty and Mortuary Affairs Operations Center in Virginia. "We're always looking to expand the data base," Bethke said.
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