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NEWS
October 14, 2000
Fund benefits Cole's sailors In response to the attack of USS Cole (DDG 67) and resulting injury and loss of life, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has established a fund to benefit sailors assigned to the ship and their family members. While plans for how the money will be used are still tentative, it will benefit USS Cole sailors and their families in their time of need. For more information, call NMCRS at 1-703-696-4904, Fax: (703) 696-2644. Those wishing to make donations can send their contribution to: Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society 801 North Randolph Street Suite 1228 Arlington, VA 22203-1978 Please be sure to designate "For USS Cole" on the check.
NEWS
November 11, 2004
Highway workers Terry Jones, Robert Brown, Chuck Triesh Jr., David Beall and Brett Meunier erect a commemorative sign Wednesday on Halfway Boulevard. The bridge over Interstate 81 has been dedicated to Fireman Apprentice Patrick Roy of Keedysville and Seaman Craig Wibberley of Williamsport, who were killed four years ago in the attack on the USS Cole in Yemen.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | December 7, 2003
julieg@herald-mail.com On the outside, it appears to be an ordinary red-brick row house on South Potomac Street. The only sign that it may not be home to a family is the gold stickers with black lettering on the coal blue front door that spell SKIVVY WAVER. The row house is a home, home to the memories and mementos of Bill Kearns, his shipmates on the USS Bon Homme Richard during the end of World War II and those of other soldiers and sailors during the war. "It's a marvel of one man's ingenuity," said Frank Hafele, 76, of Ellicott City, Md. Hafele, Kearns' shipmate, has visited the museum at 2321/2 S. Potomac St. twice, and in doing so revisited his past.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | October 12, 2007
SHARPSBURG Fireman Patrick Roy's white tombstone stands out among the gray, weathered ones of the Civil War dead at Antietam National Cemetery. Killed by terrorists in 2000 while serving aboard the USS Cole, Roy was the first person to be interred in the cemetery since it closed in 1953. A former Keedysville resident, Roy's family was given special permission to bury him there. "I'm always grateful that people take time out of their lives to come and honor Patrick," said his father, Michael Roy, after an annual ceremony Friday at the cemetery to commemorate the seventh anniversary of the attack.
NEWS
September 28, 2006
Nearly 230 people are expected to attend the USS Hector reunion today through Sunday at the Clarion Hotel and Conference Center at Antietam Creek. Approximately 130 of those attending the reunion are former sailors. "We started in 1988 in Sacramento, Calif.," convention co-host and former USS Hector sailor Don Muffle said. "Since then, we've held reunions in Lake Havasu City, Ariz., Harrisburg, Pa., Salt Lake City, Utah, Virginia Beach, Va., Buena Park, Calif., Kissimmee, Fla., Branson, Mo., and Albuquerque, N.M. " The USS Hector was built in California and was commissioned Feb. 7, 1944.
NEWS
By KAREN HANNA | March 21, 2007
BOONSBORO As the USS John F. Kennedy first took to the high seas, 21-year-old U.S. Navy signalman Gary Rohrer was collecting keepsakes - newspaper clippings, badges, photographs, the tattered remains of the first admiral's flag to fly above the aircraft carrier. He sent his parents an envelope stamped on the front with news of the ship's commissioning into service. On the back, he wrote, "Do not open or throw away. " "When you're part of something, when you're part of something that's just so special, like the commissioning of a ship, it stays with you forever," said Rohrer, who recently turned 60. Rohrer, who is Washington County's director of special projects, credits the Navy with instilling in him discipline and direction.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | October 13, 2007
SHARPSBURG - Fireman Patrick Roy's white tombstone stands out among the gray, weathered ones of the Civil War dead at Antietam National Cemetery. Killed by terrorists in 2000 while serving aboard the USS Cole, Roy was the first person to be interred in the cemetery since it closed in 1953. A former Keedysville resident, Roy's family was given special permission to bury him there. "I'm always grateful that people take time out of their lives to come and honor Patrick," said his father, Michael Roy, after an annual ceremony Friday at the cemetery to commemorate the seventh anniversary of the attack.
NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | October 13, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- For Tom Wibberley, the war on terrorism began Oct. 12, 2000, when his son died while serving aboard the USS Cole. Seaman Craig Wibberley of Williamsport and Fireman Patrick Roy of Keedysville were among 17 sailors killed by terrorists who carried out a suicide bombing in the Yemeni port of Aden. Both men were honored Monday afternoon by the United States Navy and Veterans of Foreign Wars in separate services. Tom Wibberley's memory of that day nine years ago is very clear, he said shortly after the service honoring his son at the St. Mark's Episcopal Church cemetery on Lappans Road near Boonsboro.
NEWS
October 18, 2000
Clinton hails fallen patriots By LAURA ERNDE / Staff Writer NORFOLK, Va. - Against a backdrop of somber gray skies and steely gray warships, two Washington County families listened to President Clinton Wednesday morning try to give meaning to their loss. continued "Today we honor our finest young people, the fallen soldiers who rose to freedom's challenge. We mourn their loss," Clinton told the families of the 17 seamen who were killed in Thursday's attack on the USS Cole.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | March 22, 2007
BOONSBORO - As the USS John F. Kennedy first took to the high seas, 21-year-old U.S. Navy signalman Gary Rohrer was collecting keepsakes - newspaper clippings, badges, photographs, the tattered remains of the first admiral's flag to fly above the aircraft carrier. He sent his parents an envelope stamped on the front with news of the ship's commissioning into service. On the back, he wrote, "Do not open or throw away. " "When you're part of something, when you're part of something that's just so special, like the commissioning of a ship, it stays with you forever," said Rohrer, who recently turned 60. Rohrer, who is Washington County's director of special projects, credits the Navy with instilling in him discipline and direction.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 7, 2012
The father of a Williamsport sailor who was killed aboard the USS Cole when terrorists detonated a bomb near the ship's hull in 2000 said he was glad to hear that a U.S. missile strike over the weekend killed one of the architects of the attack. Tom Wibberley, whose 19-year-old son, Seaman Craig Wibberley, died aboard the destroyer, said Monday that the death of al-Qaida operative Fahd al-Quso was long overdue. “The more (terrorists) they kill, the better,” Wibberley said.
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NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | October 12, 2011
Along with the family and friends Wednesday remembering the life and loss 11 years ago of U.S. Navy Seaman Craig Wibberley was someone who was there the day the USS Cole was attacked by al-Qaeda terrorists. Jerry Wright of Frederick, a shipmate of Wibberley's, joined the USS Cole Remembrance  Day ceremony at St. Mark's Episcopal Church, where a wreath was laid at his grave. Wibberley and another Washington County sailor, Fireman Patrick H. Roy, were among the 17 crew members killed in the Oct. 12, 2000, bombing of the ship as it sat at anchor in a Yemeni port.
NEWS
June 11, 2010
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. (AP) -- Rough weather will delay the rescue of a 16-year-old California girl adrift in her damaged yacht in the Indian Ocean, a family spokesman said Friday. A French fishing boat will arrive later than the estimated time of 11 a.m. PDT Saturday, said Jeff Casher, an adviser to Abby Sunderland's solo quest to sail around the world. He was not sure how long the delay would be. Australian search-and-rescue teams spotted Abby drifting in the frigid, rough Indian Ocean, her sailboat damaged by 30-foot waves that prompted her to set off a distress signal.
NEWS
By DON AINES | June 3, 2010
HAGERSTOWN -- Niamh McDonnell paused in mid-cupcake Thursday afternoon, her eyes lighting up and her icing-covered mouth breaking into a smile. "Daddy!" she yelled, getting up from the table and running to the uniformed man at the door of the Busy Bees classroom. Although she is just 3 years old and had not seen Rhyan Tetrault in nearly a year, Niamh had no trouble recognizing her father when he walked into the room at the Children's Learning Center at Hagerstown Community College.
NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | October 13, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- For Tom Wibberley, the war on terrorism began Oct. 12, 2000, when his son died while serving aboard the USS Cole. Seaman Craig Wibberley of Williamsport and Fireman Patrick Roy of Keedysville were among 17 sailors killed by terrorists who carried out a suicide bombing in the Yemeni port of Aden. Both men were honored Monday afternoon by the United States Navy and Veterans of Foreign Wars in separate services. Tom Wibberley's memory of that day nine years ago is very clear, he said shortly after the service honoring his son at the St. Mark's Episcopal Church cemetery on Lappans Road near Boonsboro.
NEWS
October 26, 2007
Don't call a Marine a soldier To the editor: In The Herald-Mail's front-page story, Sept. 24, "Soldier has memories he'd sometimes like to forget," we learn of Cpl. John Myers' return home from his second tour in Iraq. Although being referred to as both a soldier and a Marine throughout the article, Cpl. Myers is a Marine! I challenge the media to select their military adjectives more carefully. Marines are not soldiers and soldiers are not Marines. Nor are airmen sailors any more than sailors are soldiers, Marines or airmen.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | October 13, 2007
SHARPSBURG - Fireman Patrick Roy's white tombstone stands out among the gray, weathered ones of the Civil War dead at Antietam National Cemetery. Killed by terrorists in 2000 while serving aboard the USS Cole, Roy was the first person to be interred in the cemetery since it closed in 1953. A former Keedysville resident, Roy's family was given special permission to bury him there. "I'm always grateful that people take time out of their lives to come and honor Patrick," said his father, Michael Roy, after an annual ceremony Friday at the cemetery to commemorate the seventh anniversary of the attack.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | October 12, 2007
SHARPSBURG Fireman Patrick Roy's white tombstone stands out among the gray, weathered ones of the Civil War dead at Antietam National Cemetery. Killed by terrorists in 2000 while serving aboard the USS Cole, Roy was the first person to be interred in the cemetery since it closed in 1953. A former Keedysville resident, Roy's family was given special permission to bury him there. "I'm always grateful that people take time out of their lives to come and honor Patrick," said his father, Michael Roy, after an annual ceremony Friday at the cemetery to commemorate the seventh anniversary of the attack.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | August 16, 2007
Hagerstown Community College's Red, White & Blue Summer Concert Series of military bands continues Sunday with the U.S. Navy Band's Sea Chanters chorus. The chorus - the "singing sailors," as they are called - will perform at HCC's Alumni Amphitheater. Admission is free. The Sea Chanters ensemble was formed in 1956, when a member of the Navy Band organized a group to sing sea chanteys and patriotic songs for a State of the Nation dinner in Washington, D.C., according to the Navy Band's Web site.
NEWS
May 4, 2007
A patriotic tree planting by the Williamsport Garden Club will be held on Armed Forces Day, May 19, at 2 p.m. at the Springfield Farm Barn Complex. The tree is in memory of two Washington County servicemen, Seaman Craig Wibberley, of Williamsport, and Fireman Apprentice Patrick Roy, of Keedysville. Wibberley and Roy died doing their duty when a terrorist bomb tore through the hull of the destroyer USS Cole during a refueling stop in Yemen in October 2000. Ceremonies will include invited local dignitaries and family members.
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